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Taken Out of Context

Taken Out of Context

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Published by Pascal Van Hecke
The PHD dissertation of Danah Boyd. It describes how social networks has changed the social behavior of teens.
Abstract:
As social network sites like MySpace and Facebook emerged, American teenagers began adopting them as spaces to mark identity and socialize with peers. Teens leveraged these sites for a wide array of everyday social practices - gossiping, flirting, joking around, sharing information, and simply hanging out. While social network sites were predominantly used by teens as a peer-based social outlet, the unchartered nature of these sites generated fear among adults. This dissertation documents my 2.5-year ethnographic study of American teens' engagement with social network sites and the ways in which their participation supported and complicated three practices - self-presentation, peer sociality, and negotiating adult society.

My analysis centers on how social network sites can be understood as networked publics which are simultaneously (1) the space constructed through networked technologies and (2) the imagined community that emerges as a result of the intersection of people, technology, and practice. Networked publics support many of the same practices as unmediated publics, but their structural differences often inflect practices in unique ways. Four properties - persistence, searchability, replicability, and scalability - and three dynamics - invisible audiences, collapsed contexts, and the blurring of public and private - are examined and woven throughout the discussion.

While teenagers primarily leverage social network sites to engage in common practices, the properties of these sites configured their practices and teens were forced to contend with the resultant dynamics. Often, in doing so, they reworked the technology for their purposes. As teenagers learned to navigate social network sites, they developed potent strategies for managing the complexities of and social awkwardness incurred by these sites. Their strategies reveal how new forms of social media are incorporated into everyday life, complicating some practices and reinforcing others. New technologies reshape public life, but teens' engagement also reconfigures the technology itself.
The PHD dissertation of Danah Boyd. It describes how social networks has changed the social behavior of teens.
Abstract:
As social network sites like MySpace and Facebook emerged, American teenagers began adopting them as spaces to mark identity and socialize with peers. Teens leveraged these sites for a wide array of everyday social practices - gossiping, flirting, joking around, sharing information, and simply hanging out. While social network sites were predominantly used by teens as a peer-based social outlet, the unchartered nature of these sites generated fear among adults. This dissertation documents my 2.5-year ethnographic study of American teens' engagement with social network sites and the ways in which their participation supported and complicated three practices - self-presentation, peer sociality, and negotiating adult society.

My analysis centers on how social network sites can be understood as networked publics which are simultaneously (1) the space constructed through networked technologies and (2) the imagined community that emerges as a result of the intersection of people, technology, and practice. Networked publics support many of the same practices as unmediated publics, but their structural differences often inflect practices in unique ways. Four properties - persistence, searchability, replicability, and scalability - and three dynamics - invisible audiences, collapsed contexts, and the blurring of public and private - are examined and woven throughout the discussion.

While teenagers primarily leverage social network sites to engage in common practices, the properties of these sites configured their practices and teens were forced to contend with the resultant dynamics. Often, in doing so, they reworked the technology for their purposes. As teenagers learned to navigate social network sites, they developed potent strategies for managing the complexities of and social awkwardness incurred by these sites. Their strategies reveal how new forms of social media are incorporated into everyday life, complicating some practices and reinforcing others. New technologies reshape public life, but teens' engagement also reconfigures the technology itself.

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Published by: Pascal Van Hecke on Feb 04, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/16/2011

 
 
Taken Out of Context
American Teen Sociality in Networked Publics
by danah michele boydB.A. (Brown University) 2001M.S. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 2002A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of therequirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy inInformation Management and Systemsand the Designated EmphasisinNew Mediain theGraduate Divisionof theUniversity of California, Berkeley Committee in charge:Professor AnnaLee Saxenian, ChairDoctor Mizuko ItoProfessor Cori HaydenProfessor Jenna BurrellFall 2008
 
 
Taken Out of Context: American Teen Sociality in Networked Publics
Copyright © 2008, Some Rights Reserved (
See:
Appendix 3)danah michele boyd
 
 
1
Abstract
Taken Out of Context: American Teen Sociality in Networked Publicsby danah michele boydDoctor of Philosophy in Information Management and Systemswith a Designated Emphasis in New MediaUniversity of California, Berkeley Professor AnnaLee Saxenian, ChairAs social network sites like MySpace and Facebook emerged, Americanteenagers began adopting them as spaces to mark identity and socialize with peers.Teens leveraged these sites for a wide array of everyday social practices—gossiping,flirting, joking around, sharing information, and simply hanging out. While socialnetwork sites were predominantly used by teens as a peer-based social outlet, theunchartered nature of these sites generated fear among adults. This dissertationdocuments my 2.5-year ethnographic study of American teens’ engagement withsocial network sites and the ways in which their participation supported andcomplicated three practices—
self-presentation, peer sociality,
and
negotiating adult society.
 My analysis centers on how social network sites can be understood as
networked  publics
which are simultaneously (1) the space constructed through networked

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