Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ruins of Modernity: The failure of revolutionary architecture in the twentieth century

Ruins of Modernity: The failure of revolutionary architecture in the twentieth century

Ratings: (0)|Views: 96 |Likes:
Published by Ross Wolfe

Where does architecture stand at present, in terms of its history? Are we still — were we ever — postmodern? What social and political tasks yet remain unfulfilled, carried over from the twentieth century, in a world scattered with the ruins of modernity? Does “utopia’s ghost” (Martin), the specter of modernism, still haunt contemporary building? How can architecture be responsibly practiced today? Is revolutionary architecture even possible?

Where does architecture stand at present, in terms of its history? Are we still — were we ever — postmodern? What social and political tasks yet remain unfulfilled, carried over from the twentieth century, in a world scattered with the ruins of modernity? Does “utopia’s ghost” (Martin), the specter of modernism, still haunt contemporary building? How can architecture be responsibly practiced today? Is revolutionary architecture even possible?

More info:

Categories:Types, Graphic Art
Published by: Ross Wolfe on Dec 12, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/17/2013

pdf

text

original

 
1
R
 
R
UINS OF MODERNITY:
 
THE FAILURE OF REVOLUTIONARY

ARCHITECTURE

IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
DATE
 
ThursdayFeb 7, 20137-10
PM
 
.
CONFIRMED PANELISTS
PETER EISENMAN
REINHOLD MARTIN
 
JOAN OCKMAN
 
BERNARD TSCHUMI
 
& MORE
 
EVENT DESCRIPTION
“Let us not deceive ourselves,” Victor Hugo once advised, in his iconic
Hunchback of Notre Dame 
.“Architecture is dead, and will never come to life again; it is destroyed by the power of the printedbook.” Both as a discipline and a profession, architecture lagged behind the other applied arts. Evenwhen measures toward modernization were finally instituted, many of the most innovative,technically reproducible designs were hived off from the realm of architecture proper as mere worksof “engineering.” Toward the beginning of the twentieth century, however, fresh currents of thoughtarose within the field to lend architecture a new lease on life. Avant-garde architects emulateddevelopments that had been taking place in both the visual arts (Cubism, Futurism) and scientificmanagement of labor (Taylorism, psychotechnics), advocating geometric simplicity and ergonomicefficiency in order to tear down the rigid barrier dividing art from life. Most of the militant membersof the architectural avant-garde sought to match in aesthetics the historical dynamism theIndustrial Revolution had introduced into society. Machine-art was born the moment that
art pour l’art 
died. “Art is dead! Long live the machine-art of Tatlin!” announced the Dadaists George Groszand John Heartfield in 1920.The modernists’ project consisted in giving shape to an inseparable duality, wherein the role ofarchitecture was deduced as
simultaneously a reflection of modern society as well as an attempt to transform it 
. Amidst the tumult and chaos that shook European society from the Great War upthrough the Great Depression, revolutionary architects of all countries united in opposition to thecrumbling order of bourgeois civilization, attaching themselves to radical political movements.Forced out of Europe by fascism and subsequently out of the USSR by Stalinism, the architecturalavant-garde fled to North America. Following a second global conflagration — transposed into thepostwar boom context of America with the GI Bill, Europe under the Marshall Plan, and Japan under

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->