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Inside the Space Ships - George Adamski

Inside the Space Ships - George Adamski

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Published by John Smith
excerpt; ―We are what you on Earth might call ‗Contact men.‘ We live and work here, because, as you know, it is necessary on Earth to earn money with which to buy clothing, food, and the many things that people must have. We have lived on your planet now for several years. At first we did have a slight accent. But that has been overcome and, as you can see, we are unrecognized as other than Earth men.
―At our work and in our leisure time we mingle with people here on Earth, never betraying the secret that we are inhabitants of other worlds. That would be dangerous, as you well know. We understand you people better than most of you know yourselves and can plainly see the reasons for many of the unhappy conditions that surround you.
―We are aware that you yourself have faced ridicule and criticism because of your persistence in proclaiming the reality of human life on other planets, which your scientists say are incapable of maintaining life. So you can well imagine what would happen to us if we so much as hinted that our homes are on other planets! If we stated the simple truth—that we have come to your Earth to work and to learn, just as some of you go to other nations to live and to study—we would be labeled insane.
―We are permitted to make brief visits to our home planets. from; http://www.thenewearth.org/InsideTheSpaceShips.html available free
excerpt; ―We are what you on Earth might call ‗Contact men.‘ We live and work here, because, as you know, it is necessary on Earth to earn money with which to buy clothing, food, and the many things that people must have. We have lived on your planet now for several years. At first we did have a slight accent. But that has been overcome and, as you can see, we are unrecognized as other than Earth men.
―At our work and in our leisure time we mingle with people here on Earth, never betraying the secret that we are inhabitants of other worlds. That would be dangerous, as you well know. We understand you people better than most of you know yourselves and can plainly see the reasons for many of the unhappy conditions that surround you.
―We are aware that you yourself have faced ridicule and criticism because of your persistence in proclaiming the reality of human life on other planets, which your scientists say are incapable of maintaining life. So you can well imagine what would happen to us if we so much as hinted that our homes are on other planets! If we stated the simple truth—that we have come to your Earth to work and to learn, just as some of you go to other nations to live and to study—we would be labeled insane.
―We are permitted to make brief visits to our home planets. from; http://www.thenewearth.org/InsideTheSpaceShips.html available free

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Published by: John Smith on Feb 05, 2009
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07/24/2013

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George Adamski
 
Inside The Space Ships
 
[First published in 1956 by Arco Publishers Limited and Neville Spearman Ltd, London W.1]
 
CONTENTS
1: Return of the Venusian2: Inside a Venusian Scout Ship3: The Venusian Mother Ship4: My First Look at Outer Space5: Meeting With a Master6: Questions and Answers Within the Ship7: The Scout from Saturn8: The Saturnian Mother Ship9: The Laboratory10: Another Master11: Conversation in a Café12: Again, the Great Master13: The Banquet and a Farewell
1: RETURN OF THE VENUSIAN
 Los Angeles is a city of lights and noise, of rush andrestlessness, in striking contrast to the quiet starlight andpeace of my mountain home. It was February 18, 1953. I hadnot come to the city for excitement, but because I had beendrawn there by the kind of urgent impression described in
"Flying Saucers Have Landed."
Following a custom of many years when visiting Los Angeles,I registered in a certain downtown hotel. After the bellboy hadbrought my suitcase to the room, received his tip anddeparted, I stood uncertainly in the middle of the floor. It was
only about four o‘clock in the afternoon and since I literally
did not know what had brought me here, I felt rather at a looseend. I went over to the window and stood staring out at thebusy street. There certainly was no inspiration there.Coming to a sudden decision, I went downstairs, crossed thelobby and wandered into the cocktail lounge. The attendant
 
knew me and, although originally skeptical, after talking withme and seeing my photographs of the Saucers, had becomekeenly interested. He greeted me cordially. After we hadchatted a bit he said that a number of people had becomeinterested in his Saucer reports and had asked him to givethem a call if I should come in.He waited for my reaction and I hardly knew what to say.Momentarily at least, I had no plans. While I did not feelparticularly like giving an informal lecture to a group of strangers, on the other hand it seemed as good a way as any topass the time while waiting for . . . well, whatever I
was
waiting for!I gave my consent and soon quite a gathering of men andwomen had assembled. Their interest seemed sincere and Ianswered their questions to the best of my ability.
It was nearly seven o‘clock when I excused myself and went a
short way down the street to have dinner. I chose to be alone,
with only the persistent feeling of ―something is going tohappen‖ for company.
 After eating in a half-hearted kind of way, I returned to thehotel. There was no one in the lobby whom I knew, and thebar had no further attraction for me.Suddenly, I remembered Miss M
 — 
, a young lady student of mine who lived in the city. She had been unable to come up toour mountain place for some time and had asked me to callher when next I came down. I went into a telephone booth anddialed her number. She seemed delighted to hear from me.Having no car, however, she explained that it might be anhour or so before she could arrive by streetcar.I bought an evening paper and, to avoid encountering anyonewho might recognize me, I took it up to my room. After I hadread what was of interest to me, I forced myself to wadethough items I would ordinarily have skipped; this in anattempt to discipline the restlessness which now permeatedmy entire consciousness.Before the hour was up I went down to the lobby to wait forMiss M
 — 
and she arrived about fifteen minutes later. Wetalked for quite awhile and I succeeded in straightening herout in regard to a number of problems which, locked in hermind, had grown out of all proportion. Her gratitude wastouching and she told me that she had constantly been holding
 
the thought and hope that I would come to the city and helpher.As I walked with her to the corner where she took thestreetcar, I wondered if the urge that had reached me in themountains could possibly have been her telepathic messagegetting through. But when I was quiet again in the hotel lobbyI knew this could not be the explanation. That feeling was stillwith me
 — 
stronger than ever!I looked at my wrist watch and saw that it said ten-thirty. Thelateness of the hour, with still nothing of extraordinarysignificance having taken place, sent a wave of disappointment through me. And just at this moment of depression, two men approached, one of whom addressed meby name.Both were complete strangers, but there was no hesitancy intheir manner as they came forward, and nothing in theirappearance to indicate that they were other than averageyoung businessmen. Because I had lectured in Los Angeles,made appearances on radio and TV, and also been visited by agreat many people from that city at my Palomar Gardenshome, such an approach from strangers was not an uncommonexperience.I noted that both men were well proportioned. One wasslightly over six feet and looked to be in his early thirties. Hiscomplexion was ruddy, his eyes dark brown, with the kind of sparkle that suggests great enjoyment of life. His gaze wasextraordinarily penetrating. His black hair waved and was cutaccording to our style. He wore a dark brown business suit butno hat.The shorter man looked younger and I judged his height to beabout five feet, nine inches. He had a round boyish face, a faircomplexion and eyes of grayish blue. His hair, also wavy andworn in our style, was sandy in color. He was dressed in agray suit and was also hatless. He smiled as he addressed meby name.As I acknowledged the greeting, the speaker extended hishand and when it touched mine a great joy filled me. Thesignal was the same as had been given by the man I had meton the desert on that memorable November 20, 1952.
(Described in the book 
"Flying Saucers Have Landed"
- [an extract fromthis book of Adamski's first meeting with a Space Brother is available at the end of this main text].)

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