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The Principle of Liberty, The Economics of Prosperity & the Art of Good Government

The Principle of Liberty, The Economics of Prosperity & the Art of Good Government

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Published by John Smith
If any man, any woman, acquires or is granted power over any other or others, this will – not may, but most certainly and surely will – lead to abuse, misuse, corruption and oppression. The only Power that is competent and can be trusted to regulate the affairs of community and society is the Power of Principle, the Principle that in the pursuit of self-improvement and the exercise of liberty, no-one should injure or exploit others.

This Principle of Non-Injury is neutral and impersonal. It is a shield, protecting from injury, preventing injury.

Legislators hold no arbitrary or discretionary power. They are simply Interpreters, applying the Principle in terms of everyday events and actions. The process of Interpretation is clearly delineated and circumscribed. If there is Injury, there must be Protection. If there is no Injury, then there is neither cause nor justification for the interference of law and the exercise of its power.

available free from; http://www.thenewearth.org/PrincipleofLiberty.html
If any man, any woman, acquires or is granted power over any other or others, this will – not may, but most certainly and surely will – lead to abuse, misuse, corruption and oppression. The only Power that is competent and can be trusted to regulate the affairs of community and society is the Power of Principle, the Principle that in the pursuit of self-improvement and the exercise of liberty, no-one should injure or exploit others.

This Principle of Non-Injury is neutral and impersonal. It is a shield, protecting from injury, preventing injury.

Legislators hold no arbitrary or discretionary power. They are simply Interpreters, applying the Principle in terms of everyday events and actions. The process of Interpretation is clearly delineated and circumscribed. If there is Injury, there must be Protection. If there is no Injury, then there is neither cause nor justification for the interference of law and the exercise of its power.

available free from; http://www.thenewearth.org/PrincipleofLiberty.html

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Published by: John Smith on Feb 05, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/16/2013

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THEPRINCIPLEOFLIBERTY
 Michael Sartorius
[First Published in 1994 by ArtonPublishers, Ringmer, Sussex, Britain]
PART ONE: POWER and PRINCIPLES
Chapter 1: DEFINITIONS
-
 Defining Politics - Political Conflict -Conflict and Solutions
Chapter 2: IMPOSITION
-
 A predatory Society - Slaves and Serfs - Industrial Poverty
Chapter 3: REFORM
-
Centralized Rule - The Great Charter of 1215 -Parliamentary Supremacy
 
Chapter 4: CONSTITUTION
-
 Ideals of Constitutionalism - Constitutionin the New World - Constitutional Government 
Chapter 5: DEMOCRACY
-
Parliamentary Representation - TheSocialist Revolution - The Demise of ExtremismPART TWO: PRINCIPLES and PRACTICE 
Chapter 6: LIBERTY and LAW
-
The Ideal of Right Law - The Principleof Liberty - Liberty and Government Intervention
Chapter 7: PERSON and PROPERTY
-
 Mind, Body and Property - Extending the Protection of Law - Liberty and Enforcement Services
Chapter 8: NATURAL RESOURCES
-
 National Resources Plan - Urban Development - Landpricing
Chapter 9: ECONOMICS and COMMERCE
-
Value - Quality - Investment 
Chapter 10: GOVERNMENT and CONSTITUTION
-
 Liberty inConstitution - The Legislative Process - Quality, Productivity, Service
 
PART ONE: POWER and PRINCIPLES
Chapter 1: DEFINITIONS
 Defining Politics - Political Conflict - Conflict and Solutions
 
 Defining Politics
There are three major areas of challenge in our lives.First is the provision of our physical needs such as food, clothingand shelter; second is the pursuit of our spiritual evolution; andthird is the regulation of our contacts with one another. These threeAreas of science and endeavor can be called Physical, Spiritual,and Political, three clearly definable categories each with its ownspecific problems and solutions.Before anything else we need bodily sustenance: we need food,clothing, shelter, and all the other products and services necessaryfor physical maintenance. This is the Physical Area of science andtechnology, where we are concerned with meeting the challengesof research, invention and production in order to provide our many
 
and varied physical needs as efficiently as possible.In the Spiritual Area we are in the individual's private space of mind, intellect and spirit. Here we are concerned with mental,intellectual and spiritual growth, self-understanding, and a view of the individual's place in evolution and the wider universe.It is possible for a hermit or an island castaway to pursue his or herPhysical and Spiritual ventures entirely alone, producing physicalneeds through self-sufficiency and meditating in solitude. Politicswould have no relevance in such circumstances.But where there is contact between people there is the possibility of conflict, which leads into a further dimension: politics.The Political Area is concerned with resolving potential or actualdifferences between people: matters of personal liberty, of tradeand commerce, wages and prices, the apportionment and use of natural resources.
Physical, Spiritual, and Political.
These three Areas, while clearlydefinable as separate entities, inter-relate in a number of ways.For example, Spiritual development is dependent on the priorcondition of physical bodily health. A story is told of the Buddhameditating in the forest. His meditation was not going well and hefound difficulty in concentrating. A woman passed by carryingsome food, and seeing the holy man in meditation, placed anoffering of food before him and continued on her way. After he hadeaten, the Buddha found that he was much better able toconcentrate on his meditation.We can most certainly do exercises which discipline the body andthe demands it makes upon us; the Japanese branch of ZenBuddhism particularly stresses this aspect of training. But the factremains that we are in physical bodies which require sustenance, anamenable temperature, and shelter from the extremes of theelements. If the body is not properly protected and maintained itwill not function, physically, mentally or spiritually.It is also necessary to have time and opportunity for the pursuit of spiritual matters, in surroundings of relative tranquility conduciveto spiritual thought. This too may be difficult when work andcommuting leave little time for other pursuits, or when the home is

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