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Trafficking in Persons 2012 Web

Trafficking in Persons 2012 Web

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,274|Likes:
Published by N R Dewi Nurmayani



PREFACE



Human trafficking is a crime that ruthlessly exploits women, children and men for numerous purposes including forced labour and sex. This global crime generates

billions of dollars in profits for the traffickers. The International Labour Organization estimates that 20.9 million people are victims of forced labour globally. This estimate also includes victims of human trafficking for labour and sexual exploitation. While it is not known how many of hese victims were trafficked, the estimate implies that currently, there are millions of trafficking in persons victims in the world. Human trafficking requires a forceful

response founded on the assistance and protection for victims, rigorous enforcement by the criminal justice system, a sound migration policy and firm regulation of the labour markets.




However, if the international community is to achieve long-term successes in combating trafficking in persons, we need reliable information on the offenders, the victims,

and the trafficking flows throughout the regions.

The Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 2012 provides such information, and explores this crime across the world. Although the officially reported information that forms the basis of this report cannot be used to generate a global estimate of the number of victims, it has shed light on the patterns and flows of human trafficking, in line with the request of Member States. The Report provides a solid basis for understanding the global nature of

this form of modern slavery. Its findings are deeply troubling.





According to the Report, at least 136 different nationalities were trafficked and detected in 118 different countries. Human trafficking happens throughout the world with millions of victims falling through the cracks of their own societies only to be exploited by traffickers. They can

be found in the world’s restaurants, fisheries, brothels, farms and homes, among many other activities. One of the most worrying trends is the increase in child victims. From 2003—2006, 20 per cent of all detected victims were children. Between 2007 and 2010, the percentage of child victims had risen to 27 per cent. Trafficking originating from East Asia also remains the most conspicuous globally. Based on the Report, East Asian victims were found in 64 countries in all regions, and were often detected in large numbers





Another worrying aspect is the low conviction rates. According to the Report, the conviction rates for trafficking are at the same level as rare crimes such as homicides in Iceland or kidnappings in Norway. We, therefore, need

to work harder at detecting and punishing this shameful criminal activity.





Aside from these negative developments, there were some positive trends. By 2012, 134 countries and territories had enacted legislation criminalizing trafficking. Indeed, the percentage of countries without an offence criminalizing this activity halved between 2008 and 2012. There is also evidence that trafficking from Eastern Europe and Central Asia has been declining since 2000.





Overall, the international community has the tools to confront this crime. The widespread ratification of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children is a success story. Currently,



PREFACE



Human trafficking is a crime that ruthlessly exploits women, children and men for numerous purposes including forced labour and sex. This global crime generates

billions of dollars in profits for the traffickers. The International Labour Organization estimates that 20.9 million people are victims of forced labour globally. This estimate also includes victims of human trafficking for labour and sexual exploitation. While it is not known how many of hese victims were trafficked, the estimate implies that currently, there are millions of trafficking in persons victims in the world. Human trafficking requires a forceful

response founded on the assistance and protection for victims, rigorous enforcement by the criminal justice system, a sound migration policy and firm regulation of the labour markets.




However, if the international community is to achieve long-term successes in combating trafficking in persons, we need reliable information on the offenders, the victims,

and the trafficking flows throughout the regions.

The Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 2012 provides such information, and explores this crime across the world. Although the officially reported information that forms the basis of this report cannot be used to generate a global estimate of the number of victims, it has shed light on the patterns and flows of human trafficking, in line with the request of Member States. The Report provides a solid basis for understanding the global nature of

this form of modern slavery. Its findings are deeply troubling.





According to the Report, at least 136 different nationalities were trafficked and detected in 118 different countries. Human trafficking happens throughout the world with millions of victims falling through the cracks of their own societies only to be exploited by traffickers. They can

be found in the world’s restaurants, fisheries, brothels, farms and homes, among many other activities. One of the most worrying trends is the increase in child victims. From 2003—2006, 20 per cent of all detected victims were children. Between 2007 and 2010, the percentage of child victims had risen to 27 per cent. Trafficking originating from East Asia also remains the most conspicuous globally. Based on the Report, East Asian victims were found in 64 countries in all regions, and were often detected in large numbers





Another worrying aspect is the low conviction rates. According to the Report, the conviction rates for trafficking are at the same level as rare crimes such as homicides in Iceland or kidnappings in Norway. We, therefore, need

to work harder at detecting and punishing this shameful criminal activity.





Aside from these negative developments, there were some positive trends. By 2012, 134 countries and territories had enacted legislation criminalizing trafficking. Indeed, the percentage of countries without an offence criminalizing this activity halved between 2008 and 2012. There is also evidence that trafficking from Eastern Europe and Central Asia has been declining since 2000.





Overall, the international community has the tools to confront this crime. The widespread ratification of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children is a success story. Currently,

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Published by: N R Dewi Nurmayani on Dec 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/09/2013

 
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