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BPstatistical Review of World Energy Full Report 2012

BPstatistical Review of World Energy Full Report 2012

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Published by Leon
GLOBAL REPORT: BP Energy Outlook 2030

This year, supermajor BP released its projections for long-term energy trends in the 83 page report The BP Energy Outlook 2030

Amongst the highlights, the report predicts that:



Overall worldwide energy demand will grow 40% over the next two decades, with virtually all growth coming from developing nations.
By 2020, coal's share of the global market will begin to fall
Both the Americas and Eurasia will achieve self-sufficiency in energy
By 2030, hybrids will account for most car sales and roughly 30% of all vehicles on the road

Prefaced by CEO Bob Dudley, the report draws on expertise both within and outside the company to assess the world’s likely path of energy production and consumption from today’s vantage point.
GLOBAL REPORT: BP Energy Outlook 2030

This year, supermajor BP released its projections for long-term energy trends in the 83 page report The BP Energy Outlook 2030

Amongst the highlights, the report predicts that:



Overall worldwide energy demand will grow 40% over the next two decades, with virtually all growth coming from developing nations.
By 2020, coal's share of the global market will begin to fall
Both the Americas and Eurasia will achieve self-sufficiency in energy
By 2030, hybrids will account for most car sales and roughly 30% of all vehicles on the road

Prefaced by CEO Bob Dudley, the report draws on expertise both within and outside the company to assess the world’s likely path of energy production and consumption from today’s vantage point.

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Published by: Leon on Dec 19, 2012
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BP Statistical Reviewof World EnergyJune 2012
bp.com/statisticalreview
1 Introduction
1 Group chief executive’s introduction2 2011 in review
6 Oil
6 Reserves8 Production and consumption15 Prices16 Refining18 Trade movements
20 Natural gas
20 Reserves22 Production and consumption27 Prices28 Trade movements
30 Coal
30 Reserves and prices32 Production and consumption
35 Nuclear energy
35 Consumption
36 Hydroelectricity
36 Consumption
38 Renewable energy
38 Other renewables consumption39 Biofuels production
40 Primary energy
40 Consumption41 Consumption by fuel
44 Appendices
44 Approximate conversion factors44 Definitions45 More information
 
Introduction
1 Group chief executive’s introduction2 2011 in review
Oil
6 Reserves8 Production and consumption15 Prices16 Refining18 Trade movements
Natural gas
20 Reserves22 Production and consumption27 Prices28 Trade movements
Coal
30 Reserves and prices32 Production and consumption
Nuclear energy
35 Consumption
Hydroelectricity
36 Consumption
Renewable energy
38 Other renewables consumption39 Biofuels production
Primary energy
40 Consumption41 Consumption by fuel
Appendices
44 Approximate conversion factors44 Definitions45 More information
About this reviewContents and navigation
For 61 years, the
BP Statistical Review of World Energy 
has provided high-qualityobjective and globally consistent data onworld energy markets. The review is one ofthe most widely respected and authoritativepublications in the field of energy economics,used for reference by the media, academia,world governments and energy companies.A new edition is published every June.
Find out more online
BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2012 
 is available online at
bp.com/statisticalreview 
. Thewebsite contains all the tables and charts foundin the latest printed edition, plus a number ofextras, including:Historical data from 1965 for many sections.Additional data for natural gas, coal, hydroelectricity,nuclear energy, electricity and renewables.An energy charting tool, where you can viewpredetermined reports or chart specific dataaccording to energy type, region and year.An oil, natural gas and LNG conversion calculator.PDF versions and PowerPoint slide packs of thecharts, maps and graphs, plus an Excel workbookof the historical data.About BPBP is one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies.We market our products in more than 70 countries.Our business segments are Exploration and Production,and Refining and Marketing. Through these businesssegments, we provide fuel for transportation, retailbrands and energy for heat and light.Guide to navigation
BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 201
uses the following icons andcolour coding to help you navigate your wayquickly and easily through the document.Icons and colours represent various energytypes so you can see, at a glance, whichsection you are in.
Appendices
For approximateconversion factors anddefinitions see
page 44 
Disclaimer
The data series for proved oil and gas reserves in
BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2012 
does not necessarily meet the definitions, guidelines andpractices used for determining proved reserves at company level, for instance,under UK accounting rules contained in the Statement of Recommended Practice,‘Accounting for Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, Production andDecommissioning Activities’ (UK SORP) or as published by the US Securities andExchange Commission, nor does it necessarily represent BP’s view of provedreserves by country. Rather, the data series has been compiled using a combinationof primary official sources and third-party data.
Go online
You can view or orderthis Review at
bp.com/statisticalreview 
 
 1
Group chief executive’s introduction
Bob Dudley
Group Chief Executive
June 2012 
Welcome to the 61st annual edition of the
BP Statistical Review of World Energy 
.As is our longstanding custom, each June we take stock, and a step back fromday-to-day activities to publish the annual data we have collected on the world’senergy markets, to assess what has happened this last year and how last year’sexperience relates to longer-term trends. In a fast-changing world, I believe it isimportant to understand both the forces behind today’s headlines as well as theunderlying trends that are shaping the new energy landscape that our childrenand grandchildren will inherit. I find it essential and insightful to focus on theobjective, rigorous data contained in this review.2011 was an unusually eventful year in global energy. The tumultuousevents of the ’Arab Spring‘ shook energy markets and underscored theimportance of maintaining spare capacity and strategic stockpiles for dealingwith supply disruptions. The earthquake and tsunami in Japan was a humanitariandisaster; and one with immediate implications – in Japan and around the world for nuclear power and other fuels. Oil prices hit an all-time record high. Yet therevolution in shale gas production drove US natural gas prices lower, reachingrecord discounts to oil.With all of these issues in play, global energy consumption grew by 2.5%in 2011, broadly in line with the historical average but well below the 5.1% seenin 2010. Once again emerging economies accounted for all of the net growth inenergy consumption, with demand in the OECD falling for a third time in the lastfour years.On the production side, the loss of oil supplies in Libya and elsewherewas eventually more than offset by large increases among Middle EasternOPEC members, leading to record oil production in Saudi Arabia, the UAE, andQatar. Meanwhile, the US recorded the largest non-OPEC production increasefor a third consecutive year. In my mind, it is no coincidence that the innovationsdriving the renaissance in US oil and gas production are taking place in one ofthe most open and competitive upstream segments in the world. The exampleof North America highlights how competition and a level playing field fosterinnovation, ultimately leading to the production of previously inaccessible, new,’unconventional‘ resources.Crises and disruptions to one side, this year’s data also confirm how anumber of longer-term trends remained in place. The center of gravity for worldenergy consumption continues to shift from the OECD to emerging economies,especially in Asia. The world is not structurally short of hydrocarbon resources –as our data on proved reserves confirms year after year – but long lead times andvarious forms of access constraints in some regions continue to create challengesfor the ability of supply to meet demand growth at reasonable prices.Fossil fuels still dominate energy consumption, with a market share of 87%.Renewable energy continues to gain but today accounts for only 2% of energyconsumption globally. Meanwhile, the fossil fuel mix is changing as well. Oil,still the leading fuel, has lost market share for 12 consecutive years. Coal wasonce again the fastest growing fossil fuel, with predictable consequences forcarbon emissions.At this level, change comes only slowly to the global energy system. It isimportant for all of us – producers and consumers, along with our governmentsand everyone interested in energy – to address today’s challenges without losingsight of slower-moving structural changes, including those we are seeking tobring about. It is a singular contribution of this review to keep us firmly rooted inobjective data: a rigorous understanding of where we are – and where we havebeen – is necessary for us to build a safe and sustainable energy future together.I would like to thank BP’s economics team and all those around the worldwho have helped prepare this review – in particular those in governments in manycountries who contribute their official data.
Energy in 2011–disruptions andcontinuity

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