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William Francis Finlason-The History of the Jamaica Case (1869)

William Francis Finlason-The History of the Jamaica Case (1869)

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"
The
work,
which
is
wellexecuted,
has
a
permanent
interest
and
value.
No
lawyer
and
few
students
of
history
and
politics
should
be
without
it."
Globe,
22nd
August,
1868.
"
The
book
is
the
work
of
a
lawyer
and
a
man
ofsense.
It
contains
a
full
account
of
the
present
state
of
the
law
on
the
subject."
Post,
August,
1868.
"
Few
lawyers
or
laymen
were
accurately
informed
as
to
the
state
of
the
law,
in
reference
to
the
repression
of
insurrection
or
rebellion.
No
text
book,
so
far
as
we
know,
was
available,
although
the
need
of
one
must
have
occasionally
been
felt
;
the
omission
to
supply
it
being
the
more
remarkable
when
we
consider
on
the
one
hand
how
tenacious
not
only
Englishmen
but
those
who
live
under
the
same
con-
stitutional
Government,
are
oftheir
rights
and
liberties
;
and
on
the
otherthat
officers
of
the
Crown
are
responsible
for
neglect
of
duty,
as
well
as
for
exceeding
their
jurisdiction.
The
object
of
Mr.
Finlason
is
to
make
good
the
deficiency
;
and
praise
must
be
accorded
to
him
for
the
manner
in
which
he
has
performed
his
task.
He
has
been
at
great
pains
to
collect
all
the
legal
and
historical
dicta
bearing
upon
these
points,
andupon
the
legality
of
martial
law
in
general,
which
were
to
be
met
with.
He
has
moreover
digested
them
with
care,
and
discussed
them
ably
and
learnedly."
Midland
Counties
Herald,
September
10th,
1868
.
"
The
caseof
Governor
Eyre
excited
the
greatest
possible
interest
in
this
country.
It
did
so
for
two
reasons
;
first,
because
of
the
uncertainty
in
regard
to
the
legality
ofmartial
law,
secondly
because
a
political
issue
was
supposed
to
underlie
the
legal
question.
The
paradox
thatthe
law
places
the
sword
in
the
hand
of
its
officers,
and
entrusts
them
with
its
power,
only
to
punishsuch
officers
for
using
thediscretionary
authority
according
to
their
judgment,
has
no|foundation
in
fact.
Governor
Eyre,
as
the
saviour
of
Jamaica,
is
entitled
to
the
gratitude
of
Englishmen.
For
his
lucid
review
ofthe
authorities
which
protect
our
property
and
lives,
we
have
to
thankMr.
Fin-
lason."
Oxford
Times,
17th
October,
1868.
"
In
every
way
the
book
before
us
corresponds
with
its
predecessors
in
respect
of
clearness
and
correct
jurisprudence.
To
lawyers
it
will
be
necessary,
not
to
say
in-
dispensable,
and
to
politiciansuseful.
We
heartily
recommend
the
book
to
every
student
of
our
Constitution,
as
one
which
exhausts
the
law
upon
a
much
vexed
question."Newcastle
Daily
Journal,
16th
October,
1868.
REPORT
OF
THE
CASE
OF
THE
QUEEN
v.
EYRE,
IN
THE
COURT
OF
QUEEN'S
BENCH
:
With
an
Introduction,
upon
the
Liability
of
a
Colonial
Governor
to
Criminal
Prosecution.
London
:
Stevens
&
Son,
Bell
Yard,
and
Chapman
&
Hall,
Piccadilly.
"Mr.
Finlason,
whose
recent
works
on
martial
law
are
among
the
most
im-
portant
contributions
we
possess
to
pur
knowledge
of
a
difficult
subject,
has
now
issued
a
full
report
of
a
case
in
which
almost
all
the
principlesof
his
favourite
study
are
involved.
He
has
given
us
along
and
faithful
report
of
the
trial
with
theindictment,
the
evidence
from
the
depositions,
and
the
charge
of
Mr.
Justice
Blackburn,
the
whole
accompanied
by
an
elaborate
introduction."
Globe
Seotember
19th,1868.
JUSTICE
TO
A
COLONIAL
GOVERNOR
;
or,
Some
Considerations
on
the
Case
of
Mr.
Eyre.
(a.
)
London
:
Chapman
&
Hall.
"
The
book
before
us
contains
the
substance
of
all
the
documents,
discussions
and
proceedings
relating
to
the
case
of
Mr.
Eyre,
and
the
author
certainly
makes
out
a
more
complete
justification
of
the
much-persecuted
ex-governor
than
has
hitherto
appeared
It
is
impossible
torise
from
the
reading
of
this
work
without
being
satis-
fied
that
Mr.
Eyre
had
good
reason
for
every
step
he
took
in
the
suppression
of
the
rebellion
m
Jamaica,
and
thac
by
those
measures
he
spared
the
lives
of
the
white
population,
and
saved
the
island.
Those
who
would
understand
the
real
merits
of
the
position
occupied
by
the
Lord
Chief
Justice
Cockburn
in
the
matter
of
the
Evre
prosecution
shouldread
this
work.
It
is
almost
impossible
to
avoid
theconclusion
that
this
great
lawyer
was
led
away
by
popular
feeling
to
take
a
view
of
the
case
not
warranted
by
the
law
or
the
facts.
No
onehas
done
so
much
as
Mr
Finlasond
Exeter
(a)
The
Introduction
to
the
present
work.
 
THE
HISTORY
OF
THE
JAMAICA
CASE:
BEING
AN
ACCOUNT,
FOUNDEDUPON
OFFICIAL
DOCUMENTS,
OF
THE
im
0f
%
fopts
in
THE
CAUSES
WHICH
LED
TO
IT,
AND
THE
MEASURES
TAKEN
FOR
ITS
SUPPRESSION;
THE
AGITATIONEXCITED
ON
THE
SUBJECT,
ITS
CAUSES
AND
ITS
CHARACTER;
AND
THE
DEBATES
IN
PARLIAMENT,
AND
THE
CRIMINAL
PROSECUTIONS,
ARISING
OUT
OF
IT.
Scconti
(Etuttcn,
<55nIanjetJ
anti
W.
F.
FINLASON,
ESQ.,
(Barrister
-at-
Law?)
EDITOR
OP
"CROWN
AND
NISI
PRIUS
REPORTS"
IN
ALL
THE
COURTS,
FOR
THE
YEARS
FROM
1854
TO
1864
;
AUTHOR
OF
"
COMMENTARIES
ON
MARTIAL
LAW,
"THE
LAW
OF
RIOT
AND
REBELLION,"
&c.,&c.,
&c.
K
LONDON:
CHAPMAN
AND
HALL,
PICCADILLY.
1869.