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Useful Wild Plants of the United States and Canada- Saunders

Useful Wild Plants of the United States and Canada- Saunders

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Published by paceminterris
All the familiar vegetables and fruits of our kitchen gardens, as well as the cereals of our fields, were once wild plants; or, to put it more accurately, they are the descendants, improved by cultivation and selection, of ancestors as untamed in their way as the primitive men and women who first learned the secret of their nutritiousness.
All the familiar vegetables and fruits of our kitchen gardens, as well as the cereals of our fields, were once wild plants; or, to put it more accurately, they are the descendants, improved by cultivation and selection, of ancestors as untamed in their way as the primitive men and women who first learned the secret of their nutritiousness.

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Published by: paceminterris on Dec 31, 2012
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01/05/2013

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USEFULWILD PLANTS
OF THE
UNITED STATES AND CANADA
BY
CHARLES
FRANCIS SAUNDERS
Author of “Under the Sky in California,” “With the Flowersand Trees in California,”
Finding the Worth While inCalifornia,”
Finding the Worth While inthe Southwest,” Etc.ILLUSTRATED BY PHOTOGRAPHS,AND BY NUMEROUS LINE DRAWINGSBY LUCY HAMILTON ARING
NEW YORKROBERT M. M
C
BRIDE & CO.
1920
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
PAGE
I
IIIIIIVVVI
VII
VIIIIXXXI
I
NTRODUCTORY
S
TATEMENT
. . . . . . . . . . viiW
ILD
P
LANTS WITH
E
DIBLE
T
UBERS
, B
ULBS OR
R
OOTS
1W
ILD
 
P
LANTS
 
WITH
E
DIBLE
T
UBERS
, B
ULBS OR
R
OOTS
(Cont inued)
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
.
 
17
W
ILD
S
EEDS
 
OF
F
OOD
V
ALUE
,
AND
How T
HEY
H
AVE
B
EEN
U
TILIZED
. . . . . . . . . . . 41T
HE
A
CORN AS
H
UMAN
F
OOD AND
S
OME
O
THER
W
ILD
N
UTS
. . . . .. . . . . . . . . 67S
OME
L
ITTLE
R
EGARDED
W
ILD
F
RUITS
AND
B
ERRIES
. 83W
ILD
P
LANTS
 
WITH
E
DIBLE
S
TEMS AND
L
EAVES
. . 114B
EVERAGE
P
LANTS
OF
F
IELD AND
W
OOD
. . . . . 141V
EGETABLE
S
UBSTITUTES
F
OR
S
OAP
. . . . . . 167S
OME
M
EDICINAL
W
ILDINGS
W
ORTH
K
NOWING . .
184M
ISCELLANEOUS
U
SES OF
W
ILD
P
LANTS
. . . . 210
A
C
AUTIONARY
C
HAPTER ON
C
ERTAIN
P
OISONOUS
P
LANTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 236R
EGIONAL
I
NDEX
. . . . . . . . . . . 259G
ENERAL
I
NDEX
. . . . . . . . . . . 269
 
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
A
LL the familiar vegetables and fruits of ourkitchen gardens, as well as the cereals of ourfields, were once wild plants; or, to put it more ac-curately, they are the descendants, improved bycultivation and selection, of ancestors as untamed intheir way as the primitive men and women who firstlearned the secret of their nutritiousness.Many of these-as, for example, the potato, Indian corn, cer-tain sorts of beans and squashes, and the
tomato-
are of New World origin; and the purpose of thisvolume is to call attention to certain other usefulplants, particularly those available as a source of human meat and drink, that are to-day growing wildin the woods, waters and open country of the UnitedStates. Though now largely neglected, many of these plants formed in past years an importantelement in the diet of the aborigines, who werevegetarians to a greater extent than is generallysuspected, and whose patient investigation and in-genuity have opened the way to most that we knowof the economic possibilities of our indigenous flora.White explorers, hunters and settlers have also, at

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