Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
8Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Book Sample - Once Upon A Time: Using Story-Based Activities to Develop Breakthrough Communication Skills

Book Sample - Once Upon A Time: Using Story-Based Activities to Develop Breakthrough Communication Skills

Ratings: (0)|Views: 5,954|Likes:
Published by Terrence Gargiulo
What can you achieve with this book?
Once Upon a Time will show you how to develop exceptional communication skills, and it will
serve as an invaluable resource for helping others do the same. Stories are a natural part of how
we communicate. Yet many of us are unaware of the different ways we use stories. We will take
the intuitive aspects of communicating through stories and break it down into repeatable practices
and essential competencies. The story-based activities in the second half of the book will
give you powerful, easy to lead, structured, experiential exercises that can be used in a variety of
settings and for lots of different purposes that go beyond training.

How is this book organized?
Once Upon a Time is divided into two parts. Part One of the book offers story-based techniques
and tools for developing breakthrough communication. Topics covered include how stories function,
what role they play in effective communication, how stories are wonderful tools for creating
experiential learning, the five levels on which stories operate, and nine ground rules for
working with stories. Developed from research with Fortune 500 companies, a story-based communication
competency model is presented, along with a tool to measure them. Part One ends
with guidelines on how to help others make sense out of their stories.

Part Two of the book is a collection of story-based activities for developing breakthrough communication
skills. The introduction to Part Two provides two charts to help you select the activity
best suited for your purposes. The book’s table of contents will also be helpful, since it includes short
descriptions of all the activities. Part Two ends with tips and techniques for telling stories, selecting
stories, and “story energizers”, short and fun story-based exercises for recharging a group. The
CD-ROM accompanying the book includes many resources and handouts to support you.
What can you achieve with this book?
Once Upon a Time will show you how to develop exceptional communication skills, and it will
serve as an invaluable resource for helping others do the same. Stories are a natural part of how
we communicate. Yet many of us are unaware of the different ways we use stories. We will take
the intuitive aspects of communicating through stories and break it down into repeatable practices
and essential competencies. The story-based activities in the second half of the book will
give you powerful, easy to lead, structured, experiential exercises that can be used in a variety of
settings and for lots of different purposes that go beyond training.

How is this book organized?
Once Upon a Time is divided into two parts. Part One of the book offers story-based techniques
and tools for developing breakthrough communication. Topics covered include how stories function,
what role they play in effective communication, how stories are wonderful tools for creating
experiential learning, the five levels on which stories operate, and nine ground rules for
working with stories. Developed from research with Fortune 500 companies, a story-based communication
competency model is presented, along with a tool to measure them. Part One ends
with guidelines on how to help others make sense out of their stories.

Part Two of the book is a collection of story-based activities for developing breakthrough communication
skills. The introduction to Part Two provides two charts to help you select the activity
best suited for your purposes. The book’s table of contents will also be helpful, since it includes short
descriptions of all the activities. Part Two ends with tips and techniques for telling stories, selecting
stories, and “story energizers”, short and fun story-based exercises for recharging a group. The
CD-ROM accompanying the book includes many resources and handouts to support you.

More info:

Published by: Terrence Gargiulo on Feb 09, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

09/30/2011

pdf

 
Foreword
 Mel Silberman
H
e ran up to me at the end of a conference session, grabbed my hand, andshook it vigorously. “That was a stellar presentation, Mr. Silberman. You arean extraordinary storyteller; thank you for sharing your gift with us this after-noon.” He pressed a business card into my hand and walked away before I evenhad to chance thank him for his comments. Later that night I emptied the contentsof my pocket and found his card. Hm . . . I thought to myself, “Terrence L.Gargiulo, president of MAKINGSTORIES.net.” That’s interesting. I wonder whathe does. That was over seven years ago. Since then I have learned quite a bit aboutthis extraordinary facilitator.As Terrence was preparing to write this book, he asked me whether I would beinterested in working with him on the project. The link between my passions forexperiential and active learning was clear, but I was at a loss as to how I couldhelp him. He was quick to remind me, “Mel, you do this stuff all the time. You’re brilliant at it, and it’s so easy for you.”“Alright, Terrence, that’s all well and good and thanks for the flattery, but I’mnot sure if I can teach people how to do this—that’s your bailiwick,” I responded.“Besides, if I am an effective communicator with stories, I am completely uncon-scious of what I am doing and how I am doing it. Give me an example of what Ido so well that you appreciate.”Never one to turn down a challenge, Terrence replied, “Okay. Do you remem- ber the discussion you were leading last week on how to understand people duringyour PeopleSmart workshop?”“Yes. . . . What about it?”“When people were struggling with the techniques and tools you were pre-senting, you began to elicit people’s experiences. In ten minutes you amassed thisrich collection of people’s stories. Without judging any of them, you probed thegroup with reflective questions. People started working with each other’s storiesand within moments connections, lessons, parallels, insights, and advice startedpouring out of everyone’s mouths. The energy was contagious, and the excitementin the room was unbelievable. Then you masterfully helped the group distill andorganize the flood of information. The link between the workshop’s material and
xv
 
people’s day-to-day struggles with understanding other people jumped alive. Youused stories to tickle their imaginations.”I was still a little puzzled by Terrence’s passionate display of enthusiasm. Ipressed him further, “That’s an interesting observation. Tell me more.”“Look, Mel, I know this way of communicating is second-nature to you. Yousee stories are pervasive—they are all around us. Stories are how we communicate,learn, and think, but knowing how to leverage their power is a latent capacity thatremains dormant in most of us. In order for people to experience breakthroughcommunication skills, this potential needs to be unleashed. That’s our job. That’swhy I get up in the morning.”“Right now, Terrence, you are tiring me out. I think this is a project you shouldtackle on your own. You have my blessing, and I even promise to write a forewordfor this prodigious undertaking. I can’t wait to see how you craft this book.” Sohere I am writing the foreword.
Once Upon a Time: Using Story-Based Activities to Develop BreakthroughCommunication Skills
serves a dual purpose: it will show you how to developexceptional communication skills and it will serve as an invaluable resource forhelping others do the same. I can’t say enough about this book or the uniquefacilitation talents of Terrence. In my humble opinion, this book is destined to become a classic.
xvi
Foreword 
 
5
1
Techniques for Workingwith Stories
S
tories go hand in hand with effective communication. In this chapter we begin by looking at the relationship between stories and experiential learning.Developing breakthrough communication skills in ourselves and others benefitsfrom a synergistic relationship between the two. Next we examine a simple frame-work for how stories function. This is a well-established communication frameworkthat I have developed (see my book
The Strategic Use of Stories in OrganizationalCommunication and Learning
). It offers us a workaround to the near-impossible taskof agreeing on what constitutes a story. Following the framework, we explore fivelevels on which stories operate. The chapter ends with nine communication groundrules and some techniques to guide us when we are working with stories.
Stories and Experiential Learning
According to the Association of Experiential Education, experiential learning is“the process through which a learner constructs knowledge, skill, and valuefrom direct experience.” Reflection is also a central part of many definitions.Experiential learning immerses us into a sea of participatory engagement withunchartered domains of knowledge. Stories possess the potential to gift us withnew-found wisdom. They offer a wealth of opportunities for surfacing insights. Inother words, stories are stimuli for triggering the imaginative production of en-gaging models of learning that can be synthesized by tellers and listeners. Storiesare exciters of learning and containers of meaning that we can unpack to shed newlight on ourselves.Experiential learning occurs when we impregnate the environment with possi- bilities. Our stories catalyze the petri dish of learning. We are experimenting with

Activity (8)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Chespy Ginori liked this
Rohit Shenoy liked this
volunteer25 liked this
dudiaamrita liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->