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soap manufacture

soap manufacture

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Published by: pakde jongko on Feb 09, 2009
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07/31/2013

pdf

 
THE HANDBOOK OF
SOAP MANUFACTURE
BY
W. H. SIMMONS, B.Sc. (Lond.), F.C.S.
AND
H. A. APPLETON
 
 Produced by Ben Beasley, Richard Prairie, Josephine Paolucciand the Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.net. (This file was produced from imagesgenerously made available by The Internet Archive/MillionBook Project.)
WITH TWENTY-SEVEN ILLUSTRATIONS
 LONDONSCOTT, GREENWOOD & SON"THE OIL AND COLOUR TRADES JOURNAL" OFFICES8 BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL, E.C.1908[
 All rights reserved 
]
 
PREFACE
In the general advance of technical knowledge and research during the last decade, theSoap Industry has not remained stationary. While there has not perhaps been anything of a very revolutionary character, steady progress has still been made in practically allbranches, and the aim of the present work is to describe the manufacture of Householdand Toilet Soaps as carried out to-day in an up-to-date and well-equipped factory.In the more scientific portions of the book, an acquaintance with the principles of elementary chemistry is assumed, and in this we feel justified, as in these days of strenuous competition, no soap-maker can hope to compete successfully with his rivalsunless he has a sound theoretical as well as practical knowledge of the nature of the rawmaterials he uses, and the reactions taking place in the pan, or at other stages of themanufacture. We also venture to hope that the work may prove useful to Works'Chemists and other Analysts consulted in connection with this Industry.At the same time, in the greater part of the book no chemical knowledge is necessary, thesubject being treated in such a way that it is hoped those who are not directly engaged inthe manufacture of soap, but who desire a general idea of the subject, will find it of value.In the sections dealing with the composition and analysis of materials, temperatures areexpressed in degrees Centigrade, these being now almost invariably used in scientificwork. In the rest of the book, however, they are given in degrees Fahrenheit (the degreesCentigrade being also added in brackets), as in the majority of factories these are stillused.As regards strengths of solution, in some factories the use of Baumé degrees is preferred,whilst in others Twaddell degrees are the custom, and we have therefore given the twofigures in all cases.[Pg iv]In the chapter dealing with Oils and Fats, their Saponification Equivalents are given inpreference to Saponification Values, as it has been our practice for some years to expressour results in this way, as suggested by Allen in
Commercial Organic Analysis
, and allour records, from which most of the figures for the chief oils and fats are taken, are sostated.For the illustrations, the authors are indebted to Messrs. E. Forshaw & Son, Ltd., H. D.Morgan, and W. J. Fraser & Co., Ltd.W. H. S.H. A. A.London,
September 
, 1908.

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