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MET_Ensuring Fair and Reliable Measures_Practitioner Brief

MET_Ensuring Fair and Reliable Measures_Practitioner Brief

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Published by: GothamSchools.org on Jan 09, 2013
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10/16/2013

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MET
 project
 
EnsuringFair and ReliableMeasures o Efective Teaching
 
Culminating Findingsrom the MET Project’sThree-Year Study
POLICY ANDPRACTITIONER BRIEF
 
ABOUT THIS REPORT:
This non-technical research brie or policymakers and practitioners summarizes recent analyses romthe Measures o Eective Teaching (MET) project on identiying eective teaching while accounting or dierences amongteachers’ students, on combining measures into composites, and on assuring reliable classroom observations.
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Readers who wish to explore the technical aspects o these analyses may go to www.metproject.org to fnd the three companionresearch reports:
Have We Identifed Eective Teachers? 
by Thomas J. Kane, Daniel F. McCarey, Trey Miller, and Douglas O.Staiger;
 A Composite Estimator o Eective Teaching
by Kata Mihaly, Daniel F. McCarey, Douglas O. Staiger, and J.R. Lockwood;and
The Reliability o Classroom Observations by School Personnel
by Andrew D. Ho and Thomas J. Kane.Earlier MET project bries and research reports also on the website include:
Working with Teachers toDevelop Fair and ReliableMeasures of Teaching
(2010).A white paper describing therationale or and componentso the MET project’s studyo multiple measures oeective teaching.
Learning about Teaching:Initial Findings from theMeasures of Effective TeachingProject
 (2010). A researchreport and non-technicalpolicy brie with the sametitle on analysis o student-perception surveys andstudent achievement gainmeasures.
Gathering Feedback for Teaching: CombiningHigh-Quality Observationswith Student Surveys and  Achievement Gains
 (2012). Aresearch report and policy/practitioner brie with thesame title with initial fndingson the reliability o classroomobservations and implicationsor combining measures oteaching.
 Asking Students aboutTeaching: StudentPerception Surveys and Their Implementation
(2012). A non-technicalbrie or policymakers andpractitioners on the qualitieso well-designed studentsurveys and implicationsor their implementationor teacher eedback andevaluation.January 2013
ABOUT THE MET PROJECT:
The MET project is a research partnership o academics, teachers, and education organizationscommitted to investigating better ways to identiy and develop eective teaching. Funding is provided by the Bill & MelindaGates Foundation.The approximately 3,000 MET project teachers whovolunteered to open up their classrooms or this work arerom the ollowing districts: The Charlotte-MecklenburgSchools, the Dallas Independent Schools, the DenverPublic Schools, the Hillsborough County Public Schools,the Memphis Public Schools, the New York City Schools,and the Pittsburgh Public Schools.Partners include representatives o the ollowinginstitutions and organizations: American Institutes orResearch, Cambridge Education, University o Chicago,The Danielson Group, Dartmouth College, EducationalTesting Service, Empirical Education, Harvard University,National Board or Proessional Teaching Standards,National Math and Science Initiative, New Teacher Center,University o Michigan, RAND, Rutgers University,University o Southern Caliornia, Stanord University,Teachscape, University o Texas, University o Virginia,University o Washington, and Westat.
MET Project Teachers
DenverMemphisHillsboroughCountyDallasCharlotte-MecklenburgPittsburghNew YorkCity
 
Contents
Executive Summary 3Can Measures o Eective Teaching IdentiyTeachers Who Better Help Students Learn? 6How Much Weight Should Be Placedon Each Measure o Eective Teaching? 10How Can Teachers Be Assured TrustworthyResults rom Classroom Observations? 16What We Know Now 20Endnotes 23
Culminating Findings from the MET Project’s Three-Year Study
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