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2333 Printmaking TAMUK SPRING 2013.pdf

2333 Printmaking TAMUK SPRING 2013.pdf

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How will work be evaluated?Who teaches this class?
 Jesus De La Rosa,
 
M.F.A. Assistant Professor
or more ino check out my website: www.jesusdelarosa.net
How To Get In Touch?
 
Your are welcome to visit during myposted oce hours or by making an appointment. My oceis located inside the Ben Bailey Art Building Room 185
Ofce Hours - MW:
9AM-10PM & 4PM-5PM •
TTH:
9AM-12PM
Send Me An E-Mail:
 jesus.de_la_rosa@tamuk.edu
Call or Text:
(956) 457-0475
Leave Me A Message:
 
You can leave a written messagein my box at the (ACT) oce Room 175 Speech Building
oce phone: (361) 593-3401 • art oce fax: (361) 593-3402
 
What’s the class about?
 Course Description:
 This course concentrates on the technical as-pects o traditional printmaking processes: relie, silkscreen, lithogra-phy, monotypes, monoprints, and intaglio as medium o creative im-aging and expression. These concepts can range rom the mundaneto the sublime, including interpretations o physical reality and/or in-vented reality. In order to achieve these conceptual goals, students areexpected to develop their ormal design skills as well as their technicalprociency in the demonstrated applications o printmaking. Studentswill also incorporate sotware technology, like Adobe Photoshop, Illus-trator, and InDesign in the production o prints. Recognizing and ap-plying creative urges and impulses are paramount. Along with beau-tiul aesthetic qualities, printmaking processes can be exploited togenerate and realize ideas.
Catalog Description:
Printmaking. (ARTS2333) 3(2-4) An art studio course which explores various printmakingtechniques, including planographic, intaglio, stencil and relie withemphasis on their expressive power. Studio ee, $10.
 Texas A&M University-Kingsville
 
ARTS-2333-001
SPRING
 
Location: BAIL 189MONDAY & WEDNESDAY - 10:00 A.M. - 12:50 P.M.
2          0          1          3
F
ollowing my exact directions, your work ethicand accountability to your work are what willget you an excellent (A) grade. Not ollowing di-rections and simply abiding by the minimum re-quirements in the syllabus is adequate equalingaverage, equaling to a letter grade o C. Your nalgrade will also be based on your participation inthe critiques (hone and rene the language o critiques), and eforts to improve your work, itsquality and execution.
Requirements:
completion o our proj-ects worth 20 points each, critique anddemo participation worth 20 points ora total o 100 points.
 Project # 1:–worth 20 ptsProject # 2:–worth 20 ptsProject # 3:–worth 20 ptsProject # 4:–worth 20 ptsCritiques / Demos:–worth 20ptsPROJECTS ARE DUE
ON SPECIFIED CALEN-DAR DATES. A FINISHED PROJECT IS READYFOR PRESENTATION AT THE BEGINNING OFCLASS! THERE IS NO MAKE UP OR EXTRACREDIT WORK! LATE WORK WILL NOT BE AC-CEPTED!
If its late you get ZERO points!
ALL FIVE PROJECTS MUST BE PLACED INA PORTFOLIO AND TURNED IN ON THESCHEDULED FINALS DATE (TBA) YOURPORTFOLIO MUST CONTAIN, YOUR FIRST AND LAST NAME, SEMESTER AND YEAR.
Grading System
:
It is important to ocus upon the objectives o each project. Grading revolves around an evaluation o eachobjective using the ollowing scales:
A (90 - 100) Excellent work,
exceeds objectives, very high in originality, extremely well-conceived and execute
B (80 - 89) Good work,
meets objectives well, is original, well-conceived and executed.
C (70 79) Acceptable work,
meets objectives, airly well-conceived and executed
D (60 69) Inerior work,
basically complete, but alls short o objectives and needs work in terms o idea & execution
F (below 60) Failing work,
signicantly incomplete, does not meet objectives and is poorly conceived and/or executed
    w    w    w .    t    a    m    u     k    p    r     i    n    t    m    a     k     i    n    g .    c    o    m
Student Learning Outcome:
 
At the completion o this course, student’s success will be measured by:1. Adaptation o printmaking skills learned2. Understanding resources and materials4. Consistent critical engagement5. Strong and clear vocabulary in correlation to skills learned
Objectives:
• To learn technical skills in order to generate prints by the student• To broaden artistic and conceptual knowledge through printmaking.• Incorporate new software technologies for the production of prints.• To evaluate conceptual ideas and productivity of prints• Provide hands on experience working with these software programs, serigraphy equipment and concepts.• Implementing conceptual ideals through digital media.• Discuss the organization of an edition and preparing nished les for pre-press.
 
CRITIQUE & DEMO PARTICIPATION
Class critiques will help you evaluate the strengths and weaknesses within each project by practicing new vocabulary and printmaking con-cepts presented in class. Critiques are designed to encourage the development o your technical skills and conceptual ideas. Your participa-tion and the expression o ideas and opinions in critiques are a major part o this course. You need to be vocal and participate.Demos are designed to help you understand each project and how to approach the completion o each assignment. During demonstrationsyou will learn how to properly and saely use the equipment in the printmaking lab. You will not start a project until you have participated inthe demonstration.
HOW TO GAIN CRITIQUE POINTS:
• Show up to critiques• Present work or work in progress during critiques• Do not leave early or be late to critiques• Give feedback to your peers• Engage in the conversation about artwork being presented• Talk about your artwork during critiques
QUALITY OF ARTWORK
I EXPECT THE PRODUCTION OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY ARTWORK THE QUALITYOF YOUR PRINTS SHOULD BE SUPERIOR AND OF EXCELLENT CONDITION!! 
HOW TO GAIN QUALITY POINTS:
• Not having Irregular ink spots on prints: meaning there are some parts of the ink that are lighter or darker• Not having ink stains or any kind of stains on the front or back of paper• Signing your prints in pencil• Registering multiple color prints correctly• Cutting edition paper the exact same size• Placing all you prints inside a portfolio for nal review• Your ideas are your and very original
Attendance Policy:
You mustbe in class to complete the proj-ects so don’t miss class! Class rolewill be taken every class meet-ing.
FIVE POINTS PER ABSENCEWILL BE DEDUCTED FROMYOUR FINAL GRADE.
 The stu-dent is expected to attend allclasses and laboratory sessions.It is the responsibility o the stu-dent to inorm the instructor o absences. When, however, inthe judgment o the instructor, astudent has been absent to sucha degree as to impair his or herstatus relative to credit or thecourse, the instructor may dropthe student rom the class with agrade o “DP” or “DF”.
Drop Policy:
UndergraduateStudents Subject to Senate Bill1231: Beginning with the 2007-2008 Academic Year, undergrad-uate students subject to SenateBill 1231 will be permitted onlysix (6) non-punitive drops dur-ing their undergraduate studies.Non-punitive grades included inthe maximum number o dropswill be identied on the transcriptwith a grade o QI. Once a stu-dent has accumulated 6 (six) QIgrades, the only grade that maybe awarded or a dropped courseis a grade o QF, regardless o thestudent’s academic standing inthe class. Drops processed whilewithdrawing rom the universitywill not be included in the maxi-mum number o non-punitivedrops.
Grievance Process:
 The generalpolicy regarding a grievance isto grant an opportunity to ad-dress an issue one level abovethe person whose action is be-ing contested. The process mayvary depending upon the area o concern but will generally involveseveral possible steps. The proce-dure utilized shall provide or aprompt and air consideration o the complaint. I extenuating cir-cumstances prevent either partyrom meeting the time ramestipulated, all parties involved willconer and agree on an alternateschedule. Proceedings are not judicial trials and ormal rules o evidence shall not apply, but evi-dence submitted must be materi-al and relevant to the issue underconsideration. Any person whobrings a grievance has the bur-den o proo and must providedocumentation and evidence tosupport the allegation.
Sexual Harassment:
http://osa.tamuk.edu/studenthandbook/ sexualharassments.htmlSexualharassment o students and em-ployees at Texas A&M University-Kingsville is unacceptable and willnot be tolerated. Any member o the university community violat-ing this policy will be subject todisciplinary action. Please reer tothe website at www.tamuk.edu/ sass or the most current univer-sity policy on Sexual Harassment. This policy does not address theissues o sexual assault and/orphysical violence. Incidents o this nature should be reerred tothe University Police Departmentor other appropriate law enorce-ment agency.
Mobile Device Use Policy:
Keepyour cell phones on you and onat all times, but limit use to EMER-GENCIES ONLY, specially campusalters. I you receive a campusalert please proceed to inormme immediately. Limit all use o music, ear phone and other digi-tal/electronic devices to ater lec-tures are done.
Disability Policy, Americanswith Disabilities Act
Students with disabilities , includ-ing learning disabilities, who wishto request accommodations inclass, should register with theServices or Students with Dis-abilities (SSD) Lie Services andWellness (361)-593-3991 earlyin the semester so that the ap-propriate arrangements may bemade. In accordance with ederallaws, students requesting specialaccommodations must providedocumentation o their disabil-ity to the SSD coordinator. Anystudent who eels he/she manyneed accommodations based onthe impact o a disability should
 
contact me privately, beore therst assignment is assigned, todiscuss your specic needs so thatnecessary accommodations canbe made.
Student Responsibility:
Whenstudents enter a university, theybring upon themselves certainresponsibilities and obligations,including satisactory academicperormance and social behaviorconsistent with the lawul pur-poses o the university. Studentconduct, thereore, is not consid-ered in isolation within the univer-sity community but as an integralpart o the educational process.All students are expected to knowand abide by the Student Codeo Conduct. The university willhold each student responsible orcompliance with these publishedpolicies. Each student is expectedto be ully acquainted with allpublished university policies, cop-ies o which are available to eachstudent or review in the Dean o Students Oce and the JerniganLibrary at the Reserve Desk. The o-cial Texas A&M University-Kings-ville Student Code o Conduct islocated at http://osa.tamuk.edu/ studenthandbook/. (For the mostcurrent updates, see the website.)
Prohibited Conduct:
 The ollow-ing constitutes examples o viola-tions or which students are subjectto disciplinary action. This list is notdesigned to be all-inclusive. Otherresources o university policies arein the University Catalog, StudentOrganization Handbook, Resi-dence Hall Agreement, StudentFamily Apartment Agreement,Residence Lie Guidebook and theStudentHandbookwebsite:http:// osa.tamuk.edu/studenthand-book/.
100. Academic MisconductA.
Failure to ollow published de-partmental guidelines, proessor’ssyllabi, and other posted academicpolicies in place or the orderlyand ecient instruction o classes,use o academic resources andequipment.
B.
Unauthorized possession o examinations, reserved librarymaterials, laboratory materials orother course related materials.
C.
Failure to ollow the instructoror proctor’s test-taking instruc-tions, including but not limitedto not setting aside notes, booksor study guides while the test isin progress, ailing to sit in des-ignated locations and/or leavingthe classroom/ test site withoutpermission during a test.
D.
Prevention o the convening,continuation or orderly conducto any class, lab or class activity.Engaging in conduct that inter-eres with or disrupts universityteaching, research or class ac-tivities such as making loud anddistracting noises, repeatedlyanswering cell phones/text mes-saging or allowing pagers tobeep, exhibiting erratic or irratio-nal behavior, persisting in speak-ing without being recognized,repeatedly leaving and enteringthe classroom or test site with-out authorization and makingphysical threats or verbal insultsto the aculty member, or otherstudents and staf.
200. Academic DishonestyA.
Plagiarism: Portrayal o anoth-er’s work or ideas as one’s own.
B.
Cheating: Using unauthorizednotes or study aids; allowing an-other party to do one’s work/ exam and turning in that work/ exam as one’s own; getting helprom another party without theinstructor’s consent; submittingthe same or similar work in morethan one course without permis-sion rom the course instructors.
C.
Fabrication: Falsication orcreation o data, research or re-sources, or altering a graded work without the prior consent o thecourse instructor
D.
Lying: Deliberate alsicationwith the intent to deceive in writ-ten or verbal orm as it applies toan academic submission.
E.
Bribery: Providing, ofering ortaking rewards in exchange or agrade, an assignment or the aido academic dishonesty.
F.
Threat: An attempt to intimi-date a student, staf, or acultymember or the purpose o re-ceiving an unearned grade or inan efort to prevent the reportingo an Honor Code violation.
G.
Aid o Academic Dishonesty:Intentionally acilitating any acto academic dishonesty.
303.
Thet o public or privateproperty or o services on uni-versity property or at universitysponsored activities. This includesunauthorized use o a universityor privately-owned telephoneand/or charging unauthorizedphone calls to another person’sor the university’s billing account.Knowingly possessing stolenproperty or reselling stolen prop-erty constitutes thet or being anaccessory to thet, and is there-ore a violation o this provision.
306.
Unauthorized tampering,possession or use o universityowned or controlled equipment,including but not limited to uni-versity keys, university urnishingsand equipment.
312.
Committing acts that con-stitute disorderly conduct or dis-ruptive activity, which includesphysical or verbal abuse and/orinjury o another person; abusive,indecent, proane or vulgar lan-guage in a public place; threatsor obscene actions; nuisance orobscene telephone calls, ght-ing; and/or disrespect o therights and privileges o others;verbal and/or physical harass-ment o any university student oremployee.
313.
Breaching campus saety orsecurity, to include but not limitedto unauthorized access to univer-sity acilities, tampering/damag-ing door locks, security camerasand card access readers, duplicat-ing university keys, propping o exterior residence hall doors andthe placement o equipment orvehicles (including bicycles) soas to obstruct the means o ac-cess to/rom university buildingsand thereby endangering lie andsaety.
314.
Damaging, destroying, de-acing, misusing or littering o anyproperty o the university or uni-versity vendor, o another institu-tion or o another person on uni-versity premises or at universitysponsored activities.
320.
Breach o computer security,unauthorized use o computeracilities, misuse o any computer,networking device, telephone,copier, printer, ax machine orother university inormationtechnology resource and otherviolations o the university’s Com-puter Use Policy. All students aregranted permission to use thecomputing resources o TexasA&M University-Kingsville. Theuniversity has specic policies,which govern the use o electron-ic network acilities such as localarea networks and the Internet.Upon misuse o the computingacilities at Texas A&M University-Kingsville, the university reservesthe right to deny uture comput-ing privileges to the individual atall university owned computingacilities. Misuse o university in-ormation technology resourceswill result in restitution chargesor the service received, damageincurred and any associated costs.In addition, students ound to bein violation o this section will besubject to other disciplinary ac-tion.As a student, your use o sot-ware and the Internet is governedby TAMUK policies.
PRINTMAKING LAB Use Policy:
This is not a general campus class room It is a studiolaboratory! Access to the printmaking lab and use o all its equipment and materials is lim-ited to students enrolled in printmaking courses. The tables, desks and press beds in thelab are not exacto blade resistant, DO NOT cut directly on top o these suraces.
• DO NOT USE SPRAY ADHESIVE IN THE LAB OR INSIDE THE ART BUILDING.• FOLLOW LAB POLICES POSTED ON WALLS.• BE CONSERVATIVE IN YOUR USE OF MATERIALS• RECYCLE ALL PAPER BY PLACING IT IN BLUE RECYCLE BIN• PLACE PAPER TOWELS USED TO CLEAN FLAMMABLE MATERIAL IN RED BINS• KEEP LAB CLEAN AND CLEAN AFTER YOURSELF• RETURN FLAMMABLE SOLVENT S OR CHEMICALS TO FLAMMABLE CABINET AFTER USE
ART SUPPLIES NEEDED FORCOMPLETION OF COURSE:
• 6 ROLLS OF PAPER TOWELS• 1 (48 oz) BOTTLE VEGETABLE OIL• PORTFOLIO (a must!) (minimum size 22” x30” )• 1 100 PACK OF LATEX GLOVES (to t your hands)• 1 BOX OF COTTON SWABS (100 count)• 1 RESPIRATOR
ANY ADDITIONAL SUPPLIES TBA

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