Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Buy Now $26.95
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
P. 1
Why CEOs Fail: The 11 Behaviors That Can Derail Your Climb to the Top - And How to Manage Them

Why CEOs Fail: The 11 Behaviors That Can Derail Your Climb to the Top - And How to Manage Them

Ratings:

3.7

(5)
|Views: 52|Likes:
Published by Wiley
If any of the following behaviors sound like you or someone youwork with, beware! In Why CEOs Fail, David L. Dotlich andPeter C. Cairo describe the most common characteristics of derailedtop executives and how you can avoid them: Arrogance—you think that you're right, andeveryone else is wrong. Melodrama—you need to be the center ofattention. Volatility—you're subject to mood swings. Excessive Caution—you're afraid to makedecisions. Habitual Distrust—you focus on the negatives. Aloofness —you're disengaged anddisconnected. Mischievousness—you believe that rules are made to bebroken. Eccentricity—you try to be different just for thesake of it. Passive Resistance—what you say is not what youreally believe. Perfectionism—you get the little things right andthe big things wrong. Eagerness to Please—you try to win the popularitycontest.
If any of the following behaviors sound like you or someone youwork with, beware! In Why CEOs Fail, David L. Dotlich andPeter C. Cairo describe the most common characteristics of derailedtop executives and how you can avoid them: Arrogance—you think that you're right, andeveryone else is wrong. Melodrama—you need to be the center ofattention. Volatility—you're subject to mood swings. Excessive Caution—you're afraid to makedecisions. Habitual Distrust—you focus on the negatives. Aloofness —you're disengaged anddisconnected. Mischievousness—you believe that rules are made to bebroken. Eccentricity—you try to be different just for thesake of it. Passive Resistance—what you say is not what youreally believe. Perfectionism—you get the little things right andthe big things wrong. Eagerness to Please—you try to win the popularitycontest.

More info:

Publish date: Jul 7, 2003
Added to Scribd: Jan 18, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780787970642
List Price: $26.95 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
See more
See less

02/17/2015

206

9780787970642

$26.95

USD

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 5 to 22 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 30 to 66 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 71 to 168 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 173 to 206 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Businesses are often defined by the personalities at the top. Enron's Jeff Skilling and Tyco's Dennis Kozlowski rose through the ranks with their single-minded determination and abrasive styles, but also saw their careers-and companies-fail spectacularly because of those same traits. Management consultants Dotlich and Cairo diagnose the behaviors that can sink even the most talented businesspeople. Whether it's arrogance, aloofness, volatility or any of the other personality flaws they've singled out, the authors encourage CEOs to throttle back on Type A brashness and focus more on team-building that will create a loyal and honest staff. It's an original melange of business smarts and accessible psychology, and the authors' able storytelling brings their diagnoses to life. Unfortunately, after pointing out everything CEOs are doing wrong, they don't spend much time on what they should do instead; a quick wrap-up chapter on successful managing techniques is all that's offered. But as a dissection of the leadership flaws that saw so many executives crash and burn over the last couple of years, this is a book without peer. (May 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2003-05-01, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Businesses are often defined by the personalities at the top. Enron's Jeff Skilling and Tyco's Dennis Kozlowski rose through the ranks with their single-minded determination and abrasive styles, but also saw their careers-and companies-fail spectacularly because of those same traits. Management consultants Dotlich and Cairo diagnose the behaviors that can sink even the most talented businesspeople. Whether it's arrogance, aloofness, volatility or any of the other personality flaws they've singled out, the authors encourage CEOs to throttle back on Type A brashness and focus more on team-building that will create a loyal and honest staff. It's an original melange of business smarts and accessible psychology, and the authors' able storytelling brings their diagnoses to life. Unfortunately, after pointing out everything CEOs are doing wrong, they don't spend much time on what they should do instead; a quick wrap-up chapter on successful managing techniques is all that's offered. But as a dissection of the leadership flaws that saw so many executives crash and burn over the last couple of years, this is a book without peer. (May 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2003-05-01, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Businesses are often defined by the personalities at the top. Enron's Jeff Skilling and Tyco's Dennis Kozlowski rose through the ranks with their single-minded determination and abrasive styles, but also saw their careers-and companies-fail spectacularly because of those same traits. Management consultants Dotlich and Cairo diagnose the behaviors that can sink even the most talented businesspeople. Whether it's arrogance, aloofness, volatility or any of the other personality flaws they've singled out, the authors encourage CEOs to throttle back on Type A brashness and focus more on team-building that will create a loyal and honest staff. It's an original melange of business smarts and accessible psychology, and the authors' able storytelling brings their diagnoses to life. Unfortunately, after pointing out everything CEOs are doing wrong, they don't spend much time on what they should do instead; a quick wrap-up chapter on successful managing techniques is all that's offered. But as a dissection of the leadership flaws that saw so many executives crash and burn over the last couple of years, this is a book without peer. (May 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2003-05-01, Publishers Weekly
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd