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Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Lesson Plan: Education Reform

Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Lesson Plan: Education Reform

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Lesson plan on progressive era education reform using primary sources available on the Library of Congress website, specifically images of a Rosenwald school.
Lesson plan on progressive era education reform using primary sources available on the Library of Congress website, specifically images of a Rosenwald school.

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Published by: Katie Sutton Randall on Jan 18, 2013
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Teaching with Primary Sources Across TennesseeL
ESSON
P
LAN
: E
DUCATION
R
EFORM
D
URING
 
THE
P
ROGRESSIVE
 E
RA
 
AND
 
THE
R
OSENWALD
S
CHOOLS
 
OF
 
THE
A
MERICAN
S
OUTH
 
Grades: 9-12
 
Subjects:
U.S. History, Language Arts
Time Required:
1 Class Period (50-60 minutes)
 Author:
Katie Sutton Randall,
 
Teaching with PrimarySources Across Tennessee
 O
VERVIEW
 
In this lesson, students will learn about the Julius RosenwaldFund and study images and drawings of the Cadentown Rosen-wald School in Lexington, Kentucky. The school was con-structed in 1922-23, and the images were created after 1933 aspart of the Library of Congress’s
Historic American Building Sur-vey 
. Students will analyze these sources to identify definingphysical features of Rosenwald schools, develop historical re-search questions, and learn about the private-public partner-ships that funded many Progressive Era reform efforts.
U
NDERSTANDING
G
OALS
 
Students will analyze photographs and drawings of a Rosenwaldschool in addition to secondary source material to gain a betterunderstanding of reform efforts made in education during theProgressive Era.
O
BJECTIVES
 
Students will learn to evaluate primary source materials as arti-facts, develop an understanding of the importance of historicalinquiry based on primary sources, gain a better understandingthat political, economic, and social history are connected, andrecognize that private-public partnerships often funded reformefforts during the Progressive Era.
I
NVESTIGATIVE
 
QUESTIONS
 
How can buildings be used as primary sources? What kind of relationship model did the Rosenwald initiative create for Pro-gressive reform efforts?
M
ATERIALS
 
USED
 

 


Rosenwald Schools videos, courtesy of the University of Alabama Center for Public Television

Video Discussion Questions Handout (page 5)
T
ENNESSEE
C
URRICULUM
S
TANDARDS
 Grades 9-12, U.S. History
Tennessee State Performance Indicators
7.3
Recognize the progress of political andsocial reform in America during this era (i.e.women’s suffrage, Regulation of Food andDrug Initiative, Referendum, and Recall, protection of workers’ rights, AntitrustSupreme Court decisions, Muckrakers)
7.8
Read and interpret a primary sourcedocument reflecting the social dynamics of the 1920s (e.g. Harlem Rennaissance, LostGeneration)
Teacher Performance Indicators
7.3
Explain the dynamics of political andsocial reformCadentown Rosenwald School, Caden Lane, Lex-ington, Fayette, KY HABS KY-288-1 
 
 
RESOURCES USED:Library of Congress Primary Sources:

Cadentown Rosenwald School, Lexington, KY,http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/KY0414/ 

[School house in Kirkland. Been used for several years and actually falling to pieces. Many ruralschools in Georgia are in this condition.] Location: [Kirkland, Georgia],http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/nclc.02986/ 

Newspaper article in the Salt Lake City, Utah,
Broad Ax
Secondary Sources:
Encyclopedia of Alabama

“Rosenwald Schools,” a two-part video series produced by the University of Alabama Center for Pub-lic Television on the Julius Rosenwald fund and the philanthropic building program that began in theSouth in 1913 to provide better educational facilities and opportunities for African AmericansVideo 1http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Multimedia.jsp?id=m-4126 Video 2http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Multimedia.jsp?id=m-4127 
Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture

“Julius Rosenwald Fund,” an article by Mary S. Hoffschwelle summarizing the history of the programhttp://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/entry.php?rec=728 
Step 1Connect
Before beginning the lesson, students should have some contextual knowledge of theProgressive Movement and reform efforts of the late nineteenth and early twentiethcenturies. Have students research these topics in the school library or on the Internet.What factors led to the Progressive Movement? (i.e. industrialization, urbanization,and influx of immigrant workers) Give examples of Progressive reform efforts.
Step 2Connect
Have students read the
article on the JuliusRosenwald Fund, a philanthropic building fund for African American schools acrossthe South between 1913 and 1920. Allow students time to ask questions about thearticle.
Step 3Connect
Hand out the discussion questions that correspond with the University of AlabamaCenter for Public Television Rosenwald Schools video series. PlayVideo 1 of 2andask students to follow along, answering the questions as they watch the video. At theend of Video 1, take time to discuss answers to Video 1, answering any additionalquestions the students might have.
Step 4Connect
PlayVideo 2of the University of Alabama Center for Public Television RosenwaldSchools video series and ask students to follow along, answering the questions as theywatch the video. At the end of Video 2, take time to discuss answers to Video 2, an-swering any additional questions the students might have.
 
 
Step 5Connect
Have students search the
(keyword: Cadentown Rosenwald) for the filedocumenting the Cadentown Rosenwald School in Lexington, Kentucky. Have eachstudent fill out thePrimary Source Analysis Toolto help them analyze the set of images. Teachers should refer to theTeacher’s Guide, Analyzing Photographs andPrintsto prompt discussion and help students critically examine the source materi-al.
Step 6Step 7WonderWonder
An article from an African American Salt Lake City, Utah, newspaper,
published August 5, 1922, refers to Rosenwald schools as “modern rural schools forNegroes.” Have students compare the images they saw in the videos and the imagesand drawings they studied in the
HABS/HAER collection
with the image of an earlytwentieth-century rural schoolhouse found on the Library’s website (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/nclc.02986/). Have them note differences inconstruction and building materials used.Divide students into groups and have each group develop a list of three possibleresearch questions that do more than prompt simple “yes” or “no” answers based onthis set of images. (i.e. What character defining features distinguish a RosenwaldSchool? How did building plans for Rosenwald schools use natural light? What dothese buildings convey about the era in which they were built? Were Rosenwaldschools truly “modern” for their day?)
Step 8S
TEP
9S
TEP
10InvestigateExpressReflect
Have students explore possible answers to their group’s set of research questions.Have the groups present their questions and possible answers to the class.For homework, have students write an essay answering the following questions:How did the Rosenwald school building program change the lives of southern Afri-can American students? Considering all that you have learned today and previouslyabout the Progressive Era and reform movements of the early twentieth century,how did Rosenwald schools fit the goals of Progressives? Use the rubric at the endof this lesson to evaluate the students’ essays.
P
ROCEDURE
 

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