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Statistics 578 Assignemnt 2

Statistics 578 Assignemnt 2

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Published by Mia Dee
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Published by: Mia Dee on Jan 19, 2013
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09/25/2013

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1
Assignments2 solutions: Due by Midnight Sunday, September 30
th
, 2012(dropbox of week 2) (Chapters 4, 5, and 6):
Total 70 points.
True/False (one point each)
 
Chapter 4
1. If events A and B are independent, then P(A/B) is always equal to zero.
FALSE
 
In fact P(A/B) equals P(A) which is not zero unless A is an impossibleevent.2. If events A and B are mutually exclusive, then P(A/B) is always equal to zero.
True
This is obvious from the definition of Mutually exclusive events. If B occursthen A cannot occur.3. Events whose union has the probability equal to 1 are called Exclusive Events.
FALSEThey are called Exhaustive Events Chapter 5
 
4. If the probability of success is 0.4 and the number of trials in a binomialdistribution is 150, then its standard deviation is 36.
FALSE
 
 
σ=
(np(1-p))=
(150*.4*.6) = 65. If a fair coin is tossed 100 times, then the variance of the random variabledefined as the number of heads is exactly five.
FALSE
σ
2
= np(1-p)= 100*.5*.5=25. So the standard dev is 5 not the Variance.6. If a fair coin is tossed 20 times then the probability of exactly 10 Tails is morethan 15 percent.
TRUE
It is 17.62 percent
 
Chapter 6
 
7. The number of defective pencils in a lot of 1000 is an example of a continuousrandom variable.
FALSE
It is a result of counting- so discrete.8.
For a continuous distribution, P(X ≤ 100) = P(X<100).
 
TRUE
See my Instructions
 
2
on this.9. All continuous random variables are normally distributed.
FALSE
Continuousrandom variables can be highly skewed and non-normal. A normal randomvariable is a popular example of a continuous random variable, but a continuousr.v. need not be normal.10. The mean of a standard normal distribution is always equal to 1.
FALSE.
Itsmean is zero and variance (or std deviation) equal to 1.11. Even if the sample size is more than 1000, we cannot always use the normalapproximation to binomial.
TRUE
For example if p is .001 then np would be only 1even if sample size is 1000.12. For a binomial probability experiment, with n=150 and p=.1, we cannot usethe normal approximation to the binomial distribution without continuitycorrection.
FALSE
 
Multiple Choice (2 points each)
 
Multiple Choice(Chapter 4)
1. Two mutually exclusive events having positive probabilities are______________ dependent.
 
A.
AlwaysB. SometimesC. NeverThey are necessarily dependent because the occurrence of one (seriously) affectsthe probability of the other (makes it zero). Instructions on Ch 4 page 4
2
. If P(A)>0 and P(B)>0 and events A and B are independent, then:A.
P(A)=P(B)
 
B.
 
P(
(
 A|B
)
)=P(A)
 C.
P(A B)=0
 
 
3
D.
P(A B)=P(A)
 / 
P(B/A)
E. Both A and C are correctSee My Instructions on Ch 4 page 5. Independence does not imply equality of probabilities. So the first choice is clearly wrong. The third choice applies tomutually exclusive events not independent events.. The fourth choice is alsoincorrect because there should be multiplication on the right hand side not division.So the correct answer is B.
Chapter 5
 3. In a study conducted by UCLA, it was found that 25% of college freshmensupport increased military spending. If 6 college freshmen are randomly selected,find the probability that: Exactly 3 support increased military spendingA. 0.0330
 
B.
0.1318C. 0.7844D.0 .9624(You can use Table on page 855 for n=6 and p=.25) or use computer to get thefollowing:Binomial distribution : n= 6 p= 0.25
cumulative X P(X) probability 
0 0.17798 0.177981 0.35596 0.533942 0.29663 0.830573 0.13184 0.962404 0.03296 0.995365 0.00439 0.999766 0.00024 1.000001.00000
4. A fair die is rolled 10 times. What is the probability that an even number (2, 4or 6) will occur between 2 and 4 times (inclusive)?A. 0.6123B. 0.1709C. 0.1611
D.
0.3662E. 0.3223

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