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State of Oregon Courts Corruption

State of Oregon Courts Corruption

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Published by BiloxiMarx
In the State of Oregon the corruption has been ongoing for so long, they actually believe the OIL OF GOD HAS ANOINTED the Oregonian corrupt psychopathic with the right to kill and / or destroy all that is not in compliance with the FRAUD of "New World Order," "Agenda 21," GREEN, and call what it isn't: U.S. Constitutional Republic - Michael McDonnell's case in point should make very "citizen" in Oregon State run as fast as can be, far-far away from the APARTHEID.
In the State of Oregon the corruption has been ongoing for so long, they actually believe the OIL OF GOD HAS ANOINTED the Oregonian corrupt psychopathic with the right to kill and / or destroy all that is not in compliance with the FRAUD of "New World Order," "Agenda 21," GREEN, and call what it isn't: U.S. Constitutional Republic - Michael McDonnell's case in point should make very "citizen" in Oregon State run as fast as can be, far-far away from the APARTHEID.

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Published by: BiloxiMarx on Jan 21, 2013
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01/21/2013

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Michael McDonnell killed Joey Keever with a knife in Douglas County in 1984. Itwas not a pretty thing to see, but as murders go it was run-of-the-mill. Only one persondied and there was no premeditation or obvious motive. Mr. McDonnell was a hitchhiker, having walked away from a local correctional facility work camp where he wasserving a short sentence for Driving Under the Influence. Technically an “escape,” thisopened him to a charge of aggravated murder which carried the death penalty since 12days before the murder.In our law, the death penalty is reserved to “the worst of the worst:”"Death is truly an awesome punishment. The calculated killing of a human being by the State involves, by its very nature, a denial of the executed person'shumanity. The contrast with the plight of a person punished by imprisonment isevident. An individual in prison does not lose `the right to have rights.' A prisoner retains, for example, the constitutional rights to the free exercise of religion, to befree of cruel and unusual punishments, and to treatment as a `person' for purposesof due process of law and the equal protection of the laws. A prisoner remains amember of the human family. Moreover, he retains the right of access to thecourts. His punishment is not irrevocable.”
 Furman v. Georgia
, 408 U.S. 238, 290(1972) (BRENNAN, J., concurring).A trial judge decided, in 1987, that the charge was not “proportional” to the crime,and the state appealed to the Court of Appeals which reversed. The state Supreme Courtupheld the Court of Appeals, so the case came back to Douglas County for trial. Whatfollowed was a 25-year saga of attempted, official homicide. The key players were thecounty prosecutor obsessed with McDonnell’s death, a sympathetic Supreme Courtseemingly willing to undertake any sophistry or corruption of the law to assist in killingMr. McDonnell and a series of state court trial judges who missed virtually noopportunity to circumvent their duties as trial judges in order that Mr. McDonnell be putto death.Death penalty convictions are automatically reviewed by the state Supreme Courtand they get close attention from the U.S. Supreme Court, which always scrutinizes suchconvictions carefully, and in its bloodlust Douglas County simply could not get it right, because the state Supreme Court sent it back 3 times. That was not due to the Court’sconcern that Mr. McDonnell’s rights be scrupulously honored; the Oregon Supreme Courtknew from experience that the U.S. Supreme Court was breathing down its neck andwatching carefully.The Oregon Supreme Court’s lack of concern for Mr. McDonnell’s rights morphedinto a complete lack of concern for any law that might be used to benefit him. When theCourt decided to send the case back for a new “penalty phase” - there are two parts to a

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