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Brands In The New Web

Brands In The New Web

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Published by: John on Jun 20, 2007
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employing
 
urces.
 
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ur
 
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esources
 
and
 
urces
 
 –
 
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lme
 
from
 
knore
 
anyone
 
elsremendous
 
the
 
central
 
burior
 
knowledt
 
low
 
cost
 
s
 
from
 
the
 
apers,
 
radio,
 
efficient
 
ways
 
ted
 
by
 
advertiastery
 
of 
 
t
 
in
 
business
 
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to
 
b
 
Information
ided,
 
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n
 
rands
 
akes,
 
ing
 
e
 
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e
 
of 
 
sing
 
egin
 
to
 
NETWORECONO
 
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ED
 
Y
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Ch
communicatbuilds
 
applibrands.
 
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 job
 
is
 
toand
 
commu
and
 
share.
 
For
 
more
 
indiscussion,
 
talk@multip
 
 
ices
 
is
 
a
 
ions
 
companyations
 
for
 
onli
 
enable
 
businities
 
to
 
talk,
 
l
ormation
 
or
 
mail:
 
lechoices.biz
 
that
 
ne
 
sses
 
isten
 
 
organise
 
information
 
in
 
such
 
a
 
way
 
that
 
it
 
is
 
accessible.
 
Competitive
 
advantage
 
came
 
in
 
the
 
strategic
 
creation
 
and
 
use
 
of 
 
information.
 
Drucker
 
coined
 
the
 
term
 
“knowledge
 
worker”
 
to
 
characterize
 
a
 
new
 
form
 
of 
 
labour:
 
a
 
worker
 
who
 
produces
 
and
 
consumes
 
information
 
as
 
the
 
principle
 
focus
 
of 
 
the
 
 job.
 
It
 
is
 
then
 
that
 
information
 
technology
 
became
 
necessary
 
and
 
the
 
quality
 
of 
 
data
 
that
 
knowledge
 
workers
 
could
 
transform
 
into
 
business
 
intelligence
 
and
 
answers.
 
Remember
 
that
 
competition,
 
by
 
this
 
time
 
was
 
increased
 
exponentially.
 
According
 
to
 
Drucker,
 
each
 
era
 
takes
 
forty
 
years.
 
In
 
Kenya
 
and
 
most
 
East
 
and
 
Central
 
African
 
countries
 
that
 
have
 
gone
 
through
 
the
 
process,
 
each
 
era
 
as
 
above,
 
has
 
taken
 
roughly
 
a
 
decade
 
starting
 
around
 
1950.
 
As
 
technology
 
has
 
continued
 
to
 
improve,
 
so
 
has
 
Africa’s
 
ability
 
to
 
catch
 
up.
 
The
 
fifth
 
era:
 
the
 
advent
 
of 
 
Networked
 
Economy
 
The
 
Internet
 
has
 
grown
 
fast
 
over
 
the
 
past
 
20
 
years
 
and
 
10
 
years
 
in
 
East
 
Africa,
 
since
 
it
 
burst
 
out
 
of 
 
the
 
arcane
 
academic/military
 
Research
 
and
 
Development
 
closet.
 
In
 
2000,
 
East
 
Africa
 
had
 
less
 
than
 
20,000
 
users
 
of 
 
the
 
internet.
 
Today,
 
Kenya
 
alone
 
has
 
over
 
1.25
 
Million
 
users.
 
In
 
2000,
 
the
 
Internet
 
was
 
only
 
valuable
 
insofar
 
as
 
communication
 
to
 
the
 
outside
 
world
 
 –
 
to
 
Kenyans
 
in
 
Diaspora
 
and
 
to
 
the
 
international
 
markets.
 
The
 
purpose
 
of 
 
websites
 
in
 
that
 
age
 
was
 
largely
 
to
 
be
 
another
 
channel
 
to
 
host
 
the
 
company
 
brochure.
 
Finding
 
customers
 
and
 
retaining
 
them
 
has
 
predominantly
 
been
 
the
 
preserve
 
of 
 
advertising
 
and
 
promotion.
 
In
 
fact,
 
marketing
 
departments
 
left
 
the
 
management
 
of 
 
the
 
web
 
sites
 
to
 
their
 
IT
 
departments
 
 –
 
in
 
almost
 
all
 
cases
 
the
 
corporate
 
brand
 
was
 
not
 
communicated
 
or
 
experienced
 
online.
 
This
 
era
 
has
 
changed
 
with
 
the
 
technologically
 
enabled
 
Networked
 
Economy
.
 
Moon
 
submits,
 
and
 
we
 
agree,
 
that
 
the
 
organising
 
principle
 
for
 
this
 
era
 
that
 
began
 
in
 
1995
 
in
 
Drucker’s
 
theory
 
and
 
which
 
in
 
East
 
Africa’s
 
reality
 
really
 
started
 
in
 
2000.
 
Previously,
 
as
 
the
 
Internet
 
caught
 
on,
 
it
 
was
 
assumed
 
that
 
the
 
Internet
 
was
 
the
 
organising
 
principle
 
for
 
work
 
and
 
productivity.
 
It
 
isn’t
 
 –
 
no
 
more
 
than
 
electricity
 
was
 
for
 
the
 
information
 
era.
 
Moon
 
puts
 
it
 
concisely:
 
“while
 
electricity
 
enabled
 
the
 
era,
 
information
 
was
 
the
 
organising
 
principle
 
of 
 
that
 
era.”
 
With
 
each
 
technological
 
advancement
 
 –
 
more
 
transistors
 
in
 
the
 
computer
 
chip,
 
higher
 
speed
 
networks,
 
more
 
efficient
 
software
 
development,
 
the
 
ever
 
broadening
 
array
 
of 
 
telecommunication
 
services
 
and
 
the
 
ever
 
increasing
 
convergence
 
of 
 
media
 
 –
 
drives
 
increased
 
consumption
 
of 
 
personalised
 
information,
 
skills
 
development
 
simulations
 
and
 
immersive
 
entertainment.
 
Higher
 
levels
 
of 
 
interactivity
 
produce
 
more
 
and
 
more
 
lifelike
 
behaviours
 
and
 
interactions
 
between
 
individuals
 
and
 
immersive
 
multimedia
 
environments.
 
In
 
the
 
era
 
of 
 
Trust
 
Networks,
 
individuals
 
themselves
 
become
 
new
 
significant
 
sources
 
of 
 
information
 
and
 
entertainment
 
when
 
interrelating
 
in
 
the
 
web.
 
Email,
 
Internet
 
discussion
 
groups
 
and
 
chat
 
rooms
 
 –
 
and
 
more
 
so,
 
blogs,
 
web
 
casts
 
and
 
pod
 
casts
 
now
 
successfully
 
compete
 
with
 
prime
 
time
 
television
 
and
 
other
 
traditional
 
media.
 
It
 
is
 
widely
 
accepted
 
within
 
marketing
 
circles
 
that
 
Word
 
of 
 
Mouth
 
is
 
the
 
most
 
effective
 
means
 
to
 
find
 
and
 
retain
 
customers.
 
Trust
 
networks
 
do
 
 just
 
that.
 
Al
 
Kags
 
is
 
the
 
managing Director
 
of 
 
Multiple
 
Choices.
 
A
 
recognised
 
Brands
 
Consultant,
 
he
 
is
 
a
 
member
 
of 
 
faculty
 
at
 
Brandscape
 
Africa,
 
the
 
brands
 
think
 
tank,
 
specialising
 
on
 
Online
 
branding.
 
He
 
is
 
also
 
a
 
convenor
 
of 
 
ICTvillage.com,
 
the
 
online
 
portal
 
and
 
business
 
lobby
 
that
 
brings
 
together
 
ICT
 
businesses
 
and
 
professionals
 
to
 
collaborate
 
to
 
improve
 
the
 
ICT
 
environment
 
in
 
Kenya.
 
Al
 
Kags
 
is
 
a
 
prolific
 
writer
 
and
 
has
 
been
 
published
 
in
 
many
 
publications
 
 –
 
both
 
national
 
and
 
international.
 
 
 
On
 
the
 
internet,
 
individuals
 
log
 
on
 
to
 
the
 
Internet,
 
exchange
 
Email,
 
 join
 
discussion
 
groups,
 
share
 
tip
 
techniques,
 
recommendations
 
and
 
warnings
 
about
 
companies
 
and
 
products
 
to
 
patronise
 
or
 
avoid.
 
They
 
form
 
what
 
we
 
call
 
communities
 
of 
 
practice
 
and
 
concern
 
and
 
nominate
 
(or
 
acquiesce
 
to)
 
the
 
leadership
 
of 
 
a
 
community 
 
captain
 
(a
 
C
captain)
 
 –
 
a
 
person
 
who
 
moderates
 
email
 
or
 
chat
 
room
 
discussions
 
and
 
brings
 
people
 
together
 
to
 
discuss
 
issues
 
related
 
to
 
common
 
interests
 
and
 
brands.
 
These
 
discussions
 
and
 
recommendations
 
are
 
the
 
new
 
way
 
for
 
companies
 
to
 
make
 
the
 
two
 
primary
 
processes
 
of 
 
marketing
 
happen
 
 –
 
to
 
get
 
new
 
customers
 
and
 
to
 
understand
 
their
 
needs
 
better.
 
Take
 
your
 
brand
 
Online
 
and
 
make
 
it
 
a
 
firebrand
 
Michael
 
Moon
 
defines
 
a
 
firebrand
 
as
 
the
 
brand
 
that
 
fires
 
people
 
into
 
action
 
or
 
one
 
that
 
spurs
 
prospective
 
clients
 
to
 
buy
 
and
 
to
 
build
 
a
 
relationship
 
with
 
the
 
brand.
 
In
 
the
 
Networked
 
Economy,
 
television,
 
computers,
 
mobile
 
phones,
 
radio
 
and
 
publications
 
have
 
converged
 
to
 
radically
 
transform
 
the
 
way
 
humans
 
interact
 
with
 
each
 
other’s
 
and
 
with
 
brands.
 
The
 
new
 
phase
 
of 
 
the
 
Internet
 
 –
 
dubbed
 
Web
 
2.0
 
 –
 
has
 
focused
 
on
 
this
 
transformation.
 
New
 
programming
 
technology
 
and
 
an
 
increase
 
of 
 
bandwidth
 
has
 
come
 
together
 
to
 
enable
 
individuals
 
to
 
create
 
and
 
share
 
their
 
own
 
knowledge
 
and
 
entertainment.
 
Web
 
sites
 
like
 
YouTube.com,
 
Flikr
 
and
 
myspace.com
 
have
 
come
 
to
 
illustrate
 
the
 
new
 
web
 
and
 
its
 
key
 
characteristics.
 
Michael
 
moon
 
says
 
it
 
best:
 
“If 
 
you
 
plan
 
to
 
compete
 
in
 
the
 
Networked
 
Economy,
 
you
 
must
 
master
 
the
 
art
 
and
 
science
 
of 
 
building
 
a
 
community
 
of 
 
digital
 
storytellers
 
around
 
your
 
digital
 
hearth,
 
your
 
firebrand
 
platform.”
 
In
 
a
 
nutshell,
 
your
 
web
 
presence
 
has
 
to
 
begin
 
to
 
provide
 
more
 
of 
 
a
 
reason
 
for
 
your
 
target
 
market
 
to
 
come
 
back
 
to
 
your
 
digital
 
platform
 
often
 
so
 
that
 
they
 
form
 
a
 
community
 
that
 
becomes
 
your
 
brand
 
ambassadors.
 
One
 
word,
 
One
 
idea,
 
One
 
interaction.
 
The
 
basic
 
and
 
fundamental
 
rule
 
to
 
successfully
 
taking
 
your
 
brand
 
online
 
is
 
to
 
position
 
your
 
firebrand
 
correctly.
 
This
 
means
 
that
 
your
 
key
 
customer
 
group
 
must
 
associate
 
one
 
word
 
(your
 
firebrand),
 
with
 
one
 
idea
 
(a
 
satisfaction)
 
and
 
with
 
one
 
interaction
 
(a
 
self 
 
service
 
experience).
 
To
 
simply
 
take
 
your
 
publication
 
ads
 
and
 
publish
 
them
 
on
 
your
 
web
 
site
 
does
 
not
 
even
 
begin
 
to
 
extend
 
your
 
brand
 
online.
 
Take
 
BMW
 
as
 
an
 
illustration:
 
BMW
 
is
 
positioned
 
as
 
“the
 
ultimate
 
driving
 
machine”
 
 –
 
the
 
experience
 
of 
 
high
 
performance
 
luxury
 
cars.
 
Their
 
campaigns
 
are
 
largely
 
based
 
on
 
the
 
experiential 
 
marketing
 
(as
 
discussion
 
by
 
Bernd
 
H.
 
Schmitt
 
in
 
his
 
book
 
of 
 
the
 
same
 
name).
 
In
 
TV
 
spots,
 
for
 
example,
 
BMW
 
associates
 
the
 
quiet
 
splendour
 
and
 
elegance
 
of 
 
a
 
woman
 
skiing
 
on
 
fresh
 
powder
 
(snow)
 
to
 
the
 
driving
 
experience
 
of 
 
the
 
BMW
 
X3
 
and
 
X5
 
SUV.
 
 
The
 
key
 
things
 
to
 
remember:
 
 
People
 
use
 
the
 
net
 
and
 
so
 
marketing
 
MUST
 
drive
 
the
 
web
 
initiatives
 
 –
 
not
 
the
 
IT
 
department.
 
 
Firebrands
 
are
 
built
 
by
 
communities
 
and
 
so
 
your
 
online
 
presence
 
must
 
provide
 
a
 
platform
 
to
 
build
 
a
 
community
 
of 
 
brand
 
ambassadors
 
 
Your
 
web
 
site
 
MUST
 
turn
 
strangers
 
into
 
friends
 
and
 
friends
 
into
 
customers
 
and
 
customers
 
into
 
ambassadors.
 
 
The
 
biggest
 
faux
 
pas
 
for
 
most
 
companies
 
is
 
to
 
simply
 
publish
 
their
 
offline
 
marketing
 
initiatives
 
to
 
the
 
Internet.
 
 
The
 
internet
 
requires
 
one
 
word,
 
representing
 
one
 
idea
 
that
 
provides
 
one
 
satisfaction
 
to
 
be
 
most
 
successful.
 

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