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303 syllabus

303 syllabus

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Published by Nicole Williams
writing our heritages
writing our heritages

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Published by: Nicole Williams on Jan 24, 2013
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Bridgewater State UniversitySchool of Arts, Science, and DesignEnglish 303 Writing Our HeritagesSpring 2013Nicole WilliamsTillinghast 303Office Hours:
M W 12:15-1:15, T 2:00-3:00
Phone:
508-531-2001
 Email:Nicole.williams@bridgew.edu Website: http://www.nicoleannwilliams.com 
Texts Required:
Beah, Ishmael.
 A Long Way Gone: Memories of a Boyhood Soldier.
Sarah Crichton Books,2008.Macdonald, Michael Patrick.
 All Souls: A Family Story from Southie
. New York: Ballantine,1999.Obama, Barack.
 Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance.
Crown, 2007.Rule, Rebecca and Susan Wheeler.
True Stories: Guides for Writing from Your Life
.Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2000.Zinnser, William.
Writing About Your Life: A Journey into the Past 
. De Capo Press, 2005.
Materials:
 
Notebook, 2 folders, penSuggested: camera, tape recorder, old family photo albums, old family journals and letters
Course Description:
This course will focus on writing about the connections among identity, family history, landscape, andheritage. To explore the options we have as writers, we will read essays by memoirists as well as longermemoirs. Most of the course, though, will focus on researching and writing about our own heritages. Wewill investigate family stories, migrations, and heritage using oral history, family photos, field research,archival research, genealogical research, and library research. Students will draw from this research aswell as their own life experiences to write either a series of short essays or one longer memoir. Thiscourse is about sophisticated and in depth writing about family history and how it has shaped our ownidentity. It requires interviewing, field research, and secondary research.
Course Objectives:
By the end of this course, you should be able to:
 
Develop effective research questions that explore the complexity of your heritage.
 
Know how to locate resources that would allow you to answer your research questions.
 
Conduct research into your heritage using primary sources, such as interviews, family photos,diaries, and exploring landscapes important to your heritage.
 
 
Conduct research into your heritage using secondary sources, such as scholarly works onhistory, migration, places, and cultural groups.
 
Conduct research into your heritage using literary sources, such as novels, short stories, non-fiction essays and books, poetry, and drama that explore aspects of your heritage.
 
Explore and reflect on your memories, experiences, and researched material in relation toyour heritage.
 
Draw on your memories, experiences, and research to write either a series of short essays or alonger memoir.
 
Lead a discussion on an essay or memoir that explores both what the reading is about and theresearch and writing techniques used in the writing.
 
Read essays and book-length memoirs as a fellow writer, reading for ideas on how toresearch and write about your heritage.
Course Policies:
In order to successfully pass this course you must attend class, participate in classdiscussions, complete in class writings, outside readings, homework, and complete all fourformal writing assignments. Successful completion of the formal assignments includesturning in all required drafts and attending workshops and conferences.
Attendance:
Since this is a 300 level course I believe that you all want to be here and that it goes without saying that what happens in class each day only works if everyone is here to participate as much as possible;therefore, attendance is mandatory. You are allowed two absences (a week worth of class), free and clear,no excuses necessary. After your two absences any and all absences, regardless of the reason, willadversely affect your final grade in the course. Your grade will be lowered by a 1/3 of a letter grade foreach additional absence. (ex. A B+ will go down to a B). After 4 absences (two weeks worth of class) youcould fail the course.
Participation
:
 This course depends heavily on your readiness and willingness to contribute to class discussions andactivities daily. I expect each of you to work with me and each other to make this a real community of  writers. The best of writers work with their trusted peers to share ideas and drafts.
Therefore, youmust come to class each day fully prepared having done all assigned readings and work ready to participate in class.
Class activities are designed to build off of outside work; therefore, I willknow if you are unprepared and your grade will reflect it.
In addition keep in mind:
1
 
Being absent is not an excuse for turning in late work.
All assignments areexpected to be turned in at the beginning of the class period they are due. If you are notgoing to be in class e-mail your work to me by the beginning of class time.
Lateassignments will not be accepted unless prior arrangements have been made with me.
2
 
In class work cannot be made up so it would be wise to come to class prepared each day.
Format for Assignments
:
 All formal writing (except multimodal compositions) should be:
1
 
Computer generated/typed
2
 
Double-spaced in a 12 point readable font
3
 
1 inch margins on all sides
4
 
Name, instructor, course, and date should be listed on the top left, double-spaced.
5
 
Do not double space between paragraphs
6
 
Do not include cover sheets unless specified
7
 
Documented using MLA Style
 
 Classroom Behaviors:
1
 
 You may have computers in front of your throughout class which may pose severaldistractions. Checking e-mail and surfing the web during class time is both rude andinappropriate. This behavior will not be tolerated and will affect your participationgrade.
2
 
Please remember to turn off all cell phones, ipods, mp3 players, and othercommunication devices that pose a distraction to our class. Failure to follow the policy  will result in my asking you to leave class and an absence.
3
 
Class time is not a time for private discussions amongst each other. Such behavior isrude and disruptive to the class. Please save such conversations for after class.
Respect:
Respect for others in our classroom is non-negotiable. We will be discussing many ideas and conceptsthat may challenge your current thinking. This is the fun of college! Have respect for one another and beopen to new ideas. Everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion, but everyone is allowed a chance toexpress that opinion.
Plagiarism:
Presentatio
n of someone else’s work as your own is dishonest and unacceptable.
If I find out that youhave plagiarized you will receive a zero for the assignment and, possibly, fail the course.
Beassured that I will find out if you have plagiarized, therefore it would be wise for you to do your own work and cite any and all material you take from other sources. Plain and simple-
if it isn’t your own words or
idea than tell me where you found it. If you are ever unsure of whether or not you are committingacademic dishonesty please come speak to me, and I will be happy to assist. I take academic honesty andintegrity very seriously and will follow all steps outlined by Bridgewater State University if I find a studentplagiarizing. This could result in a meeting with the Dean and possible expulsion from the University.
Departmental Writing Committee’s Academic Honesty Policy (Approved Spring 2010)
  Academic Honesty: Academic Honesty refers both to plagiarism and misrepresenting your work in other ways. Plagiarism is
the use of someone else’s words or ideas without acknowledging the original source.
 Acts of academic dishonesty include the following:
 
Turning in another students essay as your own
 
Turning the same essay (that you wrote) in for credit in two different classes. (Note: It is fine to write about the same idea in two courses, to branch off of a project to create a new one, or to push
an idea that you’ve started developing in one paper significantly further in another, but it is
academically dishonest to turn in the same writing project in two courses.)
 
Including information or ideas from a print or online source in your essay without including acitation to indicate the origin of the words
 
Including phrases or sentences from a print or online source in your essay without usingquotation marks to mark the words as coming from an outside source (even if you include acitation)If you have a question about whether you need to cite a course, ask your instructor or writing studioconsultant or simply take the safe route and cite the source.The consequences of plagiarism are serious.
Course Adaptations:
In accordance with BSU policy, I am available to discuss appropriate accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability. Requests for accommodations should be made during the drop/addperiod so that proper arrangements can be made. Students should register with the Disability ResourcesOffice in Boyden Hall for disability verification and determination of reasonable academicaccommodations.

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