Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Michigan Sea Grant College Program 2011 Great-Lakes Jobs Report

Michigan Sea Grant College Program 2011 Great-Lakes Jobs Report

Ratings: (0)|Views: 0 |Likes:
Published by Greg John Peterson

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Greg John Peterson on Jan 25, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/25/2013

pdf

text

original

 
LYNN VACCARO, MS
Coastal Research Specialist 
 JENNIFER READ, PhD
 Assistant Director andResearch Coordinator 
 Vital to Our Nations Economy:
GREAT LAKES JOBS
2011 REPORT
Michigan Sea Grant College Program
MICHU-11-203
 
Vital to Our Nation’s Economy:
 
GREAT LAKES JOBS REPORT
2
0100,000200,000300,000400,000500,000600,000
  M  i  n  n e  s o  t  a  W  i  s c o  n  s  i  n  I  l  l  i  n o  i  s  I  n d  i  a  n  a  M  i c  h  i  g   a  n  O  h  i o  P e  n  n  s  y  l  v  a  n  i  a  N e  w  Y o  r  k
      J     o      b     s      C     o     n     n     e     c      t     e      d      t     o      t      h     e      G     r     e     a      t      L     a      k     e     s
Objective
Te goal o the report,
 Jobs, Economy and the Great Lakes 
, was toexamine the economic impact o the Great Lakes by estimating the number o U.S. jobs and total payroll or industries that areconnected to the Great Lakes. Tis analysis represents a conservativeestimate o direct employment or those industries and jobs directly related to the Great Lakes. Te authors dene Great Lakes-related jobs as employment in industries that rely upon the Great Lakesor key inputs (e.g., water, sh) or economic viability (e.g., cheaptransportation that provides an economic advantage), or aresignicantly inuenced by the Lakes (e.g., by attracting visitors orclimate moderation), both currently and or historic developmento the industry. Tese industries would either not exist or nothave developed to the extent that they have reached today withoutreliance upon the Great Lakes.
Results
Te calculations in this summary are based on the most recentannual estimates or county employment rom the Bureau o Labor Statistics’ Quarterly Census o Employment & Wages andOccupational Employment Statistics programs. For all states, exceptMichigan, only jobs in specic industries in the counties bordering the Great Lakes were included. In Michigan, jobs in Great Lake-connected industries within mining (except oil and gas), manu-acturing, science and engineering were included rom across thestate. Michigan’s access to the Great Lakes created a concentrationo manuacturing inrastructure that continues to drive industry today and thereore most manuacturing jobs are connected to thelakes.
For more information on the source data, see the
 Methods 
 section of this publication.
 
MANUFACTURING:
994,879 Jobs
Te Great Lakes provide ecient transportation, which sustainsmanuacturing and steel production, while the clean, abundant water attracts chemical and pharmaceutical companies to the region.Historically, access to the lakes resulted in a concentration o technicalskill, transportation and manuacturing inrastructure. oday, itcontinues to drive manuacturing and innovation.
TOURISM AND RECREATION:
217,635 Jobs
Great Lake beaches, resort communities and natural areas support vibrant recreation and tourism industry and enhance the quality o lie or residents. Over 4 million recreational vessels are registered inthe region and people spend nearly $16 billion annually on boating trips and equipment.
1
Many take advantage o the region’s GreatLakes-dependent natural resources, including more than 9.2 millionanglers, 4.6 million hunters and 23.2 million bird watchers each year.
2
 
SHIPPING, INCLUDING FREIGHT TRANSPORTAND WAREHOUSING:
118,550 Jobs
Great Lakes vessels transport an average o 163 million tons o cargo(e.g., iron ore, coal and grain) each year.
3
Lake vessels can ship goodsthree times more eciently than rail and 10 times more eciently than trucks,
4
which gives mining, manuacturing and agriculture inthe region a competitive edge. Many o the transportation routes aremulti-modal and involve transers among lake-bound and interna-tional vessels, rail and trucks.
INTRODUCTION
 An analysis of economic data shows that more than 1.5 million jobs are directly connected to the Great Lakes,generating $62 billion in wages.
Te Great Lakes have shaped the culture, history and economy o the eight states that border the reshwater seas. Historically, the lakesormed a water highway that promoted settlement, trade, resource mining and manuacturing that enabled the region to become theindustrial heartland o the nation. Te Great Lakes continue to provide a competitive advantage or businesses and support antasticrecreational opportunities that help attract talented workers to the region.Tis analysis is based on 2009 employment data rom the Bureau o Labor Statistics and represents a conservative estimate o directemployment related to the Great Lakes in the ollowing sectors: manuacturing, tourism and recreation, shipping, agriculture, science andengineering, utilities, and mining.
Figure 1.
Percentage o Great Lakes jobs by industry (2009).
Manufacturing66%Tourism andRecreation14%Shipping8%Agriculture8%Science andEngineering2%Utilities1%Mining1%
Figure 2.
Te number o jobs in each state that are connected tothe Great Lakes (2009).
 
Vital to Our Nation’s Economy:
 
GREAT LAKES JOBS REPORT
3
AGRICULTURE, FISHING AND FOOD PRODUCTION:
118,430 Jobs
Te Great Lakes support a vibrant recreational and commercialshery. Te Lakes also moderate the climate o coastal areas,improving production and creating microclimates that are idealor specialty crops such as cherries, asparagus and wine grapes. Tehigh-value, specialty crops also provide spin-of industries such asculinary estivals and beverage production.
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING:
38,085 Jobs
wenty science, engineering and conservation-oriented occupationsare connected to the Great Lakes. Tat includes jobs that ocuson the natural environment, such as an environmental scientist,and those tied to Great Lake industries, such as ood scientists andnuclear engineers.
UTILITIES:
10,980 Jobs
Power plants are the largest user o surace water in the region.Nuclear, coal and natural gas power plants are oten located on coast where they have ready access to water or acility cooling. TeGreat Lakes also enable lucrative hydro-electricity production inSault Ste. Marie, Niagara Falls and the Upper St. Lawrence River.
MINING:
10,003 Jobs
Mining operations ourish in the Great Lakes region because thereare abundant natural resources, a regional market or the material,and access to inexpensive transportation.
Ensuring a Vibrant Future
 Water is huge draw or people — coastal trails, clean beaches and waterront businesses add tremendous value to both metropolitanand semi-rural areas. In this new economic era, growth will be lesslinked to traditional manuacturing and more ocused on quality o lie and quality o the regions natural resources. Unless we protectand restore our best environmental asset — the Great Lakes — we will not be able to retain and attract strong new businesses and greathuman resources.Te Lakes are vital not only to the basin states, but are also anintegral part o our nation’s economic and environmental health. With 83 million people, the region produced 27% o the grossdomestic product
5
and 24% o country’s exports in 2009.
6
Te GreatLakes basin is home to 38% o the Fortune 500 companies
7
and oneo the largest concentrations o research universities in the world.
8
 Great Lakes colleges and universities award 32% o the nation’sadvanced science and engineering degrees,
9
providing the humancapital needed or innovation and entrepreneurship.
1
Great Lakes Commission. 2008. Great Lakes Recreational Boating’s EconomicPunch. Ann Arbor, MI.
2
U.S. Department o the Interior, Fish and Wildlie Service. 2008. 2006 NationalSurvey o Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlie-Associated Recreation. Washington, DC:U.S. Census Bureau.
3
Lake Carriers’ Association. 2009. Statistical Annual Report o Lake Carriers’ Association. Rocky River, OH: Author. Retrieved February 11, 2011, romhttp://www.lcaships.com/SR09-Dry-Bulk%20Commerce%20-%20ext.pd 
4
U.S. Army Corp o Engineers. 2009. Great Lakes Navigation System: EconomicStrength to the Nation
5
Bureau o Economic Analysis. 2009. Gross Domestic Product by State. RetrievedFebruary 10,2011 rom: http://www.bea.gov/regional/index.htm#gsp
6
International rade Administration. 2009. State export statistics. Retrieved February 10, 2011 rom: http://tse.export.gov/SE/SEhome.aspx 
7
Fortune Magazine. April 2010. Find op Companies by State. Retrieved February 10, 2011 rom: http://money.cnn.com/magazines/ortune/ortune500/
8
Afolter-Caine, B. and J.C. Austin. 2006. Te Vital Center: A Federal State Com-pact to Renew the Great Lakes Region. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.
9
National Science Foundation. 2010. Science and Engineering Indicators: 2010. 
Data Sources
1. Quarterly Census o Employment and Wages: www.bls.gov/cew 2. Occupational Employment Statistics: www.bls.gov/oes
Table 1.
Number o jobs connected to the Great Lakes by state and industry. All data is or 2009.
INDUSTRYGREAT LAKES JOBS
Manuacturing994,879ourism and Recreation217,635Shipping 118,550 Agriculture118,430Science and Engineering38,085Utilities10,980Mining10,003
Total
 
1.51 Million
STATEGREAT LAKES JOBS
Minnesota11,877 Wisconsin173,969Illinois 380,786Indiana 54,397Michigan525,886Ohio 178,621Pennsylvania25,479New York157,547
Total 1.51 Million

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->