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Table Of Contents

IV. THE ‘‘SYSTEM’’
TRANSPORT MODELS
PROBLEMS
NOTATION*
Dimensional Analysis and Scale-up
I. INTRODUCTION
II. UNITS AND DIMENSIONS
A. Dimensions
B. Units
C. Conversion Factors
III. CONSERVATION OF DIMENSIONS
A. Numerical Values
B. Consistent Units
IV. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS
A. PIPELINE ANALYSIS
B. Uniqueness
C. Dimensionless Variables
D. Problem Solution
E. Alternative Groups
V. SCALE-UP
VII. ACCURACY AND PRECISION
NOTATION
Fluid Properties in Perspective
PROPERTIES
A. Cup-and-Bob (Couette) Viscometer
B. Tube Flow (Poiseuille) Viscometer
III. TYPES OF OBSERVED FLUID BEHAVIOR
A. Newtonian Fluid
B. Bingham Plastic Model
C. Power Law Model
D. Structural Viscosity Models
IV. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF VISCOSITY
A. Liquids
B. Gases
V. DENSITY
REFERENCES
I. STRESS AND PRESSURE
II. THE BASIC EQUATION OF FLUID STATICS
A. Constant Density Fluids
B. Ideal Gas—Isothermal
C. Ideal Gas—Isentropic
D. The Standard Atmosphere
III. MOVING SYSTEMS
A. Vertical Acceleration
B. Horizontally Accelerating Free Surface
C. Rotating Fluid
IV. BUOYANCY
V. STATIC FORCES ON SOLID BOUNDARIES
Conservation Principles
I. THE SYSTEM
II. CONSERVATION OF MASS
A. Macroscopic Balance
B. Microscopic Balance
III. CONSERVATION OF ENERGY
A. Internal Energy
B. Enthalpy
IV. IRREVERSIBLE EFFECTS
A. Kinetic Energy Correction
V. CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM
A. One-Dimensional Flow in a Tube
B. The Loss Coefficient
C. Conservation of Angular Momentum
D. Moving Boundary Systems and Relative Motion
E. Microscopic Momentum Balance
I. FLOW REGIMES
II. GENERAL RELATIONS FOR PIPE FLOWS
A. Energy Balance
B. Momentum Balance
C. Continuity
D. Energy Dissipation
III. NEWTONIAN FLUIDS
A. Laminar Flow
B. Turbulent Flow
C. All Flow Regimes
IV. POWER LAW FLUIDS
V. BINGHAM PLASTICS
C. All Reynolds Numbers
VI. PIPE FLOW PROBLEMS
A. Unknown Driving Force
B. Unknown Flow Rate
C. Unknown Diameter
D. Use of Tables
VII. TUBE FLOW (POISEUILLE) VISCOMETER
VIII. TURBULENT DRAG REDUCTION
Internal Flow Applications
I. NONCIRCULAR CONDUITS
A. Laminar Flows
B. Turbulent Flows
II. MOST ECONOMICAL DIAMETER
A. Newtonian Fluids
B. Non-Newtonian Fluids
III. FRICTION LOSS IN VALVES AND FITTINGS
A. Loss Coefficient
B. Equivalent L=D Method
C. Crane Method
D. 2-K (Hooper) Method
E. 3-K (Darby) Method
IV. NON-NEWTONIAN FLUIDS
V. PIPE FLOW PROBLEMS WITH FITTINGS
VI. SLACK FLOW
VII. PIPE NETWORKS
Pumps and Compressors
I. PUMPS
A. Positive Displacement Pumps
B. Centrifugal Pumps
II. PUMP CHARACTERISTICS
A. Required Head
B. Composite Curves
A. Vapor Lock and Cavitation
B. NPSH
C. Specific Speed
D. Suction Specific Speed
V. COMPRESSORS
A. Isothermal Compression
B. Isentropic Compression
C. Staged Operation
D. Efficiency
Compressible Flows
I. GAS PROPERTIES
A. Ideal Gas
B. The Speed of Sound
II. PIPE FLOW
A. Isothermal Flow
C. Solution of High-Speed Gas Problems
Flow Measurement and Control
I. SCOPE
II. THE PITOT TUBE
III. THE VENTURI AND NOZZLE
IV. THE ORIFICE METER
A. Incompressible Flow
B. Compressible Flow
V. LOSS COEFFICIENT
VI. ORIFICE PROBLEMS
A. Unknown Pressure Drop
VII. CONTROL VALVES
A. Valve Characteristics
B. Valve Sizing Relations
C. Compressible Fluids
D. Viscosity Correction
I. DRAG COEFFICIENT
A. Stokes Flow
B. Form Drag
D. Cylinder Drag
E. Boundary Layer Effects
II. FALLING PARTICLES
A. Unknown Velocity
B. Unknown Diameter
C. Unknown Viscosity
III. CORRECTION FACTORS
A. Wall Effects
B. Drops and Bubbles
A. Power Law Fluids
B. Wall Effects
C. Carreau Fluids
D. Bingham Plastics
Fluid–Solid Separations by Free Settling
I. FLUID–SOLID SEPARATIONS
II. GRAVITY SETTLING
III. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATION
A. Fluid–Solid Separation
B. Separation of Immiscible Liquids
IV. CYCLONE SEPARATIONS
A. General Characteristics
B. Aerocyclones
C. Hydrocyclones
Flow in Porous Media
I. DESCRIPTION OF POROUS MEDIA
A. Hydraulic Diameter
B. Porous Medium Friction Factor
C. Porous Medium Reynolds Number
II. FRICTION LOSS IN POROUS MEDIA
III. PERMEABILITY
IV. MULTIDIMENSIONAL FLOW
V. PACKED COLUMNS
G. Compressible Cake
Fluidization and Sedimentation
I. FLUIDIZATION
B. Minimum Bed Voidage
C. Nonspherical Particles
II. SEDIMENTATION
A. Hindered Settling
B. Fine Particles
C. Coarse Particles
D. All Flow Regimes
IV. THICKENING
II. DEFINITIONS
III. FLUID–SOLID TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOWS
A. Pseudohomogeneous Flows
B. Heterogeneous Liquid–Solid Flows
C. Pneumatic Solids Transport
IV. GAS–LIQUID TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW
A. Flow Regimes
Viscosities and Other Properties of Gases and Liquids
Generalized Viscosity Plot
Properties of Gases
Pressure–Enthalpy Diagrams for Various Compounds
Standard Steel Pipe Dimensions and Capacities
Flow of Water/Air Through Schedule 40 Pipe
Typical Pump Head Capacity Range Charts
Index
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Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics - Darby

Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics - Darby

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Published by Iyman Abrar
Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics - Darby
Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics - Darby

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Iyman Abrar on Jan 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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