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Wildlife Fact File - Birds - Pgs. 131-140

Wildlife Fact File - Birds - Pgs. 131-140

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Published by ClearMind84
Hamerkop, Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Tody, Tyrant Flycatcher, Eurasian Avocet, Pied Wagtail, Smew, African Gray Parrot, Imperial Eagle, Greater Prairie-chicken
Hamerkop, Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Tody, Tyrant Flycatcher, Eurasian Avocet, Pied Wagtail, Smew, African Gray Parrot, Imperial Eagle, Greater Prairie-chicken

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Published by: ClearMind84 on Jan 28, 2013
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HAMERKOP
'\
~
~i~~~~rmes
~
FAMILY
Scopidae
The
hamericop
is
a wading bird
that
is
widespread throughoutAfrica.
Using
twigs
and
mud,
it
builds an enormous chamberednest
that
can measure more than six feet across.
KEY
FACTS
SIZES
Length: About 2 feet. The male
is
slightly larger than the female.Wingspan: 3
ft.
Weight:
About 1 lb.
BREEDING
Sexual
maturity:
2-3
years.
Breeding season:
Varies
according to locality.Eggs: 3-6, white.Incubation:1 month.Fledging: 7 weeks.
LIFESTYLE
Habit: Usually
seen
singly or inpairs. Sometimes small flocks.Diet:
Small
fish, amphibians, andinsects.RElATED
SPECIES
The hamerkop
is
the only member
of
the family Scopidae.
Range
of
the
hamerkop.
DISTRIBUTIONThe hamerkop
is
found throughout Africa, south
of
the
Sahara
Desert.CONSERVATIONThe hamerkop
is
not
in danger
of
extinction at present.
FEATURES
OFTHf
·
HAM
ERKOP
Flight:
Alterna
te
lyflaps
slowly
and
gl
i
des
.
Plumagein
flight:
Orange-brown with
li
ghte
r
tail
and
wi
ngt
i
ps
.
©
MCMXCI IMP BV/IMP INC WILDLIFE FACT FILETMPRINTED
IN
U.S.A.
Egg
s:
3 to6,
white
.
Incubated
by
both
p
arents
.
Ha
t
ch
after
30days
.Bill:
Bl
a
ck
,
he
avy
lik
ea
heron'sbut
hooked
a 
the
ti
p.Feedi
ng
:
Eats
sm
a
l
f
is
h,
and ins
ec
ts
.W
aits
in
sha
low
soron bank
and
scoop
s
up
prey
n
its bi
ll.
Mayaso
sw
oop
onp
re
y
ro
m
air
.
0160200461 PACKET
46
 
Although the hamerkop
is
the
only
member
of
thefamily Scopidae,
it
resembles
a
stork in flight,
and
it
has
a
bill
similar
to
that
of
a
heron.Its name
is
theAfrikaans
word
for "hammerhead"
and
refers
to
the bird's distinctive
brown
crest.
~
H
AB
I
TS
Usually
seen
singly
or
in
pairs,
the hamerkop
may also
gather
in
small
flocks. This
bird has
ahabit
of
calling
shrilly
just
be-
fore
rainfall.
During courtship
it
leaps and hops around
its
in-
tended mate
in
a
ritual
that
is
described
by
some observers
as
comical. Most active
in
daytime, this
bird
is
usually
seen
in
shallow water or
in
flight.When
flying,
the hamerkopresembles a stork but movesmore
slowly
.
Below:
The
hamerkop has
a
loud,raucous cry.
Left:
An
adult
hamerkopsearches forprey beneaththe mirror-calmsurface
ofa
lake in
Kenya
.
Right:
The
hamerkop
is
thought
to
pair
for life.
It
reinforces this
bond
with
comicallooking courtship acts.
~
FOOD
&
HUNTING
The
hamerkop prefers a habitat with tree cover near
rivers,
marshes, and estuaries.
It
pa
trols
the banks or shallows on
its
long
legs,
using
its
keen
eye-
sight to spot the movements
of
frogs, insects, and
smallfish.
~
NESTING
The hamerkop builds a hugedome-shaped nest with anentrance tunnel and a
small
nursery room inside.
Both
partners build the nest,
usually
in
atree or on a
cliff.
The
walls
area foot thick, and the
roof
is
over twice
as
thick.The pair works closely onthe nest, which takes about
six
weeks to build. One
bird
passes a stick through theThen
it
scoops
up
the prey
in
its
flattened
bill.
Sometimesthe hamerkop
flies
slowly
overthe water, searching out preybefore spooning
it
up.
Below:
Clean shallows yield fish,frogs,
and
insects.
structure,
while
the other
pulls
it
from the opposite side.Oncemost of the
sticks
are
in
place,one
bird
coats the nest withmud.
Finally,
a
lining
of
grass
is
added.
Such
a nest
is
highlyprized
by
other birds such
as
owls,
who evict the hamerkop
if
they can.
Right:
Built
by both
adults, thedome-shaped nest
is
a
fortress
of
sticks
and mud
.
The hamerkop probably
pairs
for
life.
Its
breeding seasonvaries according to locality.
Both
parents incubate
the
eggs and feed their three to
six
chicks
.When they hatch, the
chicks
are covered
in
grayish
DID
YOU KNOW?
Since
the chicks are atlittle
risk
from predators
it
is
not clear why the
ha-
merkop builds such alarge and protective nest.• A hamerkop's nest canbear a man's weight.• Some
African
tribes
be-
lieve
the hamerkop hasmagical powers. Otherssee
it
as
an
evil
omen and
l
leave their huts
if
it
sits
on a roof or
flies
above.down.
After
a month, they are
fully
feathered. They are readyto
leave
the nest 20 days laterand disperse soon afterward.The parents
usually
return tothe same nest the followingyear to rear another brood.
 
"'
CARD
132
I
FULVOUS WHISTLING-DUCK
' ( ~ - - - - - - - -
- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ 
~
ORDER
Anseriformes
FAMILY
Anatidae
~
GENUS
&
SPECIES
~
Dendroeygna
bie%r
The
fulvous whistling-duck
is
a
long-legged and long-necked bird.
This
gooselike duck gets its name
from
the loud
and
somewhatshrill whistling call
it
makes when
it
is
flying.
SJ
KEY
FACTS
SIZES
Length: 17-21 in.
Wing
length:
8-9 in.
Weight:
20-30 oz.BREEDINGSexual
maturity:
1 year.Breeding season:
Varies
dependingon location.No.
of
eggs:
8-1 6,
pale buff.
Incubation period:
4
weeks.
Fledging
period:
8-12 weeks.
LIFESTYLE
Habit: Sociable, freshwater dabbling duck.Diet: Aquatic vegetation, insects,and invertebrates.Lifespan: Usually 3
years.
In captivity,
up to
20 years.RELATED
SPECIES
There
are
8 other
species,
includingthe Indian whistling-duck,
Dendro-cygna javanica,
and the white-facedwhistling-duck,
D.
viduata.
I
Body:
The head
shapeis
very
distinctive
with
a
steep
fore
head and
a
wedge-shaped
gray bill
.
The
general
coloring
is
brownish yellow withstreaks
of
white
and
black
.
©
MCMXCII IMP BV/IMP INC WILDLIFE FACT
FILETM
Range
of
the fulvous whistling-duck.
DISTRIBUTIONWidespread in southern parts
of North
America. Also found
in
South America, Africa, central
Asia,
and Southeast
Asia.
CONSERVATIONDespite its adaptability and mobility, the fulvous whistling-ducksuffers from continuing habitat
loss
and local persecution.
It
has
become rare in India and in some other parts
of
its range.
PRINTED
IN
U.S.A.0160200511 PACKET
51

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