Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Local Food Production in Northern and Remote Communities

Local Food Production in Northern and Remote Communities

Ratings: (0)|Views: 62|Likes:
Published by Alia Lamaadar

By fortifying the resilience of community food systems, we build a diverse, and robust national food system. There is growing interest—particularly in Canada’s North—in the concept of regional food security, meaning when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle. Food security represents a potentially critical issue for those remote communities beset by accessibility issues and reliant on long transport routes for their food supply. Food insecurity is a complex and systemic problem that requires efforts to address the financial, social, environmental, geographic, and policy barriers to reliable and nutritious food supply. Certainly, critical aspects of the solution include local capacity building, traditional foods, education, and in some cases the opportunity may exist to develop community or commercial greenhouses for the local production of fruits and vegetables.

By fortifying the resilience of community food systems, we build a diverse, and robust national food system. There is growing interest—particularly in Canada’s North—in the concept of regional food security, meaning when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle. Food security represents a potentially critical issue for those remote communities beset by accessibility issues and reliant on long transport routes for their food supply. Food insecurity is a complex and systemic problem that requires efforts to address the financial, social, environmental, geographic, and policy barriers to reliable and nutritious food supply. Certainly, critical aspects of the solution include local capacity building, traditional foods, education, and in some cases the opportunity may exist to develop community or commercial greenhouses for the local production of fruits and vegetables.

More info:

Published by: Alia Lamaadar on Jan 29, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/17/2013

pdf

 
Local Food Productionin Northern and RemoteCommunities
[Part 2 of CTCG’s Planning For Prosperity Series]
January 2013
There is growing interest—particularly in Canada’s North—in the concept of regional food security, meaning when all people, at all times, have access tosufficient, safe, and nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle. Foodsecurity represents a potentially critical issue for those remote communities besetby accessibility issues and reliant on long transport routes for their food supply.Food insecurity is a complex and systemic problem that requires efforts to addressthe financial, social, environmental, geographic, and policy barriers to reliable andnutritious food supply. Certainly, critical aspects of the solution include localcapacity building, traditional foods, education, and in some cases the opportunitymay exist to develop community or commercial greenhouses for the localproduction of fruits and vegetables.
By fortifying the resilience of community food systems, webuild a diverse, and robustnational food system.
Remote Community EnergyPlanning
The power of planning inCanada’s remote communities,where diesel use costs morethan just dollars.
[June 2012]
 
CTCG’s Planning for Prosperity Series
To Be Determined
 Let us know a cleantech topicrelevant to rural and remotecommunities, and we’ll developa briefing paper on the subject.Let us know what’s on you mind!
[Mid-2013]
 
#1#3
CTCG is a neutral, not-for-profit organizationcomprised of public and private sector partnerswho are collaborating to develop and deploy cleanenergy solutions within remote communities.
 
 
2 www.ctcg.org
55 - 80% of people in theArctic have difficulty findingenough to eat.
It is not uncommon for fruit andvegetables in some remote communitiesto cost upwards of five times that of urban communities. Over 80 remotenorthern communities in Canada receiveperishable food items such as fruit andvegetables through Nutrition NorthCanada, a program that providessubsidies for food shipped by air.While local food production might help toalleviate some access issues in thesecommunities, most remote and northernCanadian communities experience long,cold and dark winters—hardly idealgrowing conditions. Given this, and ahost of other logistical challenges, year-round local food production hastraditionally been viewed as unfeasible.However, advances in ControlledEnvironment Agriculture (CEA) havepresented themselves as viable optionsfor creating a local food supply inregions of the world consideredotherwise inhospitable growingenvironments. From arid desserts toouter space, the technology now existsto grow food in almost any environment.CEA attempts to account for hostileoutside growing conditions throughintegrated techniques and technologiesto control all aspects of the internalgrowing environment, includinglighting, temperature, nutrients,hydroponics, and air control.The challenge remains to addressthese variables at a cost that is lessthan that of income from vegetablesales. While a few communitygreenhouses are scattered acrossCanada’s North, year-roundcommercial operations have never been successfully accomplishedwithout subsidy.Greenhouses are notoriously riskyfinancial endeavors, and while theyoffer a number of potential benefitsto a community, it is vital to consider the financial risks, particularly whenpublic funds are being contributed.The following pages provide acursory outline of the analysisrequired prior to undertaking acommunity greenhouse. Broadlyspeaking, an enterprise budgetoutlining potential costs andrevenues is the first step indetermining the viability of theproject.
Community GreenhousesBenefits:
Fresh, local foods
Higher nutritional value than imports
Increased community self-sufficiency &resilience
Employment & capacity building
Community investment
Reduced food transport GHGemissions
Neutral forum for interaction & socialinclusion
Barriers:
High operation & maintenance costs
Lack of available expertise
Limited revenue generating potential
Small production results in loweconomies of scale
 
 
3 www.ctcg.org
Determine Market Demand
The most common vegetables grown in Canadian commercial greenhouses aretomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and sweet peppers. The first step in determining thesize and type of greenhouse required is to better understand what vegetables aremost desired in the community. Given the size and needs of remote communities,poly-cultivation (growing more than one vegetable) will likely be preferred. Grocerysuppliers or government agencies may be able to provide estimated consumptionrates. Once
consumer 
demand is known,
community 
demand can be estimated bymultiplying by the total population size.
Establish Preliminary Greenhouse Size
Preliminary sizing for the greenhouse can be established by scaling the productionfacility to meet local demand. This is the most logical method of determining size,given that sizing a facility where yields exceed demand will compromise economicfeasibility. A community may want to look at several production scenarios todetermine the economic viability of meeting all or a portion of demand. Estimatedgreenhouse size is based upon community vegetable demand, divided by typicalgreenhouse yield. Government agencies or greenhouse suppliers may be able toprovide yield data. Remember that most yield data is based on intensivecommercial agriculture and should be used thoughtfully, as the high productionachieved in these conditions cannot be reasonably expected from a communitygreenhouse.
Create Enterprise Budget
Generally speaking the enterprise budget will consist of estimating the annualizedcosts of the greenhouse, and deducting them from the predicted revenues. Project
Where toStart?
 Assessing the costs andbenefit to your community
(Continued)
GreenhouseVegetablePer CapitaDemand(kg/yr) Yield(kg/acre)Peppers3.23 80,937Tomatoes8.3 202,343Cucumbers4.24 145,687Lettuce11.05 83,348
Sample Greenhouse Vegetable Demand andYield Data from the ‘Multi-Year DevelopmentPlan for Yukon Agriculture & Agri-Food2008-2012’

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->