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Vision, Objectives & Goals

Vision, Objectives & Goals

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Published by Nazish Sohail
vision, objectives, goals, vision of a company, objectives of company, goals of company, SMARTs, Characteristics of a Vision, Vision vs. Mission, Vision vs. Organizational Strategy, Vision and Strategic Planning-Linkage, Functions of a Vision
vision, objectives, goals, vision of a company, objectives of company, goals of company, SMARTs, Characteristics of a Vision, Vision vs. Mission, Vision vs. Organizational Strategy, Vision and Strategic Planning-Linkage, Functions of a Vision

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Published by: Nazish Sohail on Jan 30, 2013
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02/16/2013

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Vision, Objectives & Goals
By Nazish Sohail
 
1
Introduction
Vision is anaspirational description of what an organization would like to achieve or accomplish in the mid-term or long-term future. It serves as the basis for all missions,values, objectives and goals of an organization.Vision and strategy are both important and related. But there is a priority to them.Vision always comes first. If you have a clear vision, you will eventually attract theright strategy. If you have no vision, no strategy will save you.
What is Vision?
 As discussed above, vision is a clear and succinct description of what anorganization should look like after it successfully implements its strategies andachieves its full potential. It is an expression about what an organization is wanted tobe a preferred future, a word or future picture of an organization. A Vision statement for an organization should include an
organization‟s:
 
Mission
Basic philosophy, core values or cultural features
Goals (if established)
Basic strategies
Performance criteria
Important decision making rules
 Ethical standards of all employees However, due to the generally prevailing non-understanding of the term, vision isusually understood differently by different people. Such a phenomenon has led someof the modern writers to
label this concept as “
so - well-fuzzy, unclear and impractical 
”.
 A reference was made in this regard to Jim Collin‟s book
“Built to Last” 
 which reads as follows:
“For one thing, the term “vision” had been tossed around by so many
people and used in so many different ways that it created moreconfusion than clarification. Some viewed vision as about having acrystal-ball picture of the future marketplace. Others thought in terms of a technology or product vision, such as the Macintosh computer. Still
 
2
others emphasized a vision of the organization-values, purpose,mission, goals, and images of an idealized workplace.Talk about a muddled mess! No wonder so many hardnosed practicalbusinesspeople were highly skeptical of the whole notion of vision; it just seemed so
 –
well--fuzzy, unclear and impractical.
Vision Statement 
Vision statement is an inspirational description of what and organization would like toachieve and/or accomplish in the mid-term or long-term future. It is intendedto serve as a clear guide for choosing current and future courses of action. A vision statement is sometimes called a picture of your organization in the future but
it‟s so much more than that. Your vision statement is your inspiration, the framework
for all your strategic planning. It is in fact the reason for the existence of anyorganization. A vision statement may apply to an entire organization or to a singleperson. Whether for all or part of an organization, the vision statement answers thequestion, "Where do we want to go?" A comparison between taking the idea of vision as
“a reason for the existence of anorganization” and as “so
-well-
fuzzy, unclear and impractical” would make us
understand that whichever perspective of the concept of vision is taken up by anorganization to describe the reason for its existence, can serve as the vision of thatorganization.
Characteristics of a Vision
Whatever perspective taken from, vision of an organization should have the followingcharacteristics:i.
Attainability:
What is the possibility of achieving your vision withinavailable resources?ii.
Lucidity:
An articulation of the vision which explains the main idea inclear and unambiguous terms.iii.
Concreteness:
The number of quantifiable elements and degree of quantification in those elements.

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