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RHS Newsletter 03 2007

RHS Newsletter 03 2007

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Published by Richard Morris
Redmond Historical Society Newsletter March 2007
Redmond Historical Society Newsletter March 2007

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Published by: Richard Morris on Feb 13, 2009
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06/16/2009

 
P
T
he
R
edmond
R
ecoRdeR
~ m
aRch
2007h
isToRy
 
is
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appening
 
in
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!
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T
HEMARCH 2007 NEWSLETTER
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 3OUR MiSSiON:To Dscover, Recover, Preserve, Share andCelebrate Redmond’s HstoryHiSTORY iS HAPPENiNG iN REDMOND!
REDMOND HiSTORiCAL SOCiETY
16600 NE 80th Street, Room 106Redmond, WA 98052 ~ Tel 425.885.2919webste ~ www.redmondhstory.orge-mal ~ redmondhstory@hotmal.comHOURS: Tuesday through Thursday 1-4 p.m.,Frday, 4-6 p.m. and by appontment
 
i
 just imagine a half dozen or so ladiesgathering to read books and the next thingyou know they decide to start a library. Well,that’s what happened here in Redmond 88years ago, 1909. They called themselves theNokomis Club, a name they got from readingLongfellow’s “Hiawatha” poem.The library wasn’t their rst gift to our city.They dedicated themselves to do some “RedCross” work in 1917, donated $15 for books toRedmond High School in 1913, raised moneyfor a water fountain for the school (thenlocated in Town Park, now Anderson Park),made Christmas boxes for an orphanage inDes Moines, and raised money for the schoolgymnasium and other civic projects.These gals met the last Friday of themonth for lunch, reading and discussingbooks and articles and planning fund-raising. Money was needed to make thesedreams come true so they held dances,card parties and cooked dinners for theConsolidated Grange Fair.By 1927 they had accumulated enoughmoney to rent a small building on Leary Waybetween the Redmond Trading Post (nowHalf Price Books) and the E.O. Lentz storefrom
Herman Reed
for $10 a month andopen Redmond’s rst library with 800 books.
1 i
f you think Redmond has changedin the last decade or two, join uson March 10th for stories from theDepression and later years whenEducation Hill was known as PovertyHeights!
Yvonne Johnson Conway,
daughter of
Tac
and
Perky Johnson
 and granddaughter of
Mabel Perrigo
 and
Mark Johnson
, will be ourguest speaker.“The Depression was rough,” shesays, “but canning everything from thegarden, raising beef and hogs, and deerhunting, we never went hungry.”In a biography shared with theSociety, Yvonne writes: “I wasborn in 1932 and raised in thehouse at the end of the roadon the Old Redmond Hill,also known as PovertyHeights, Starvation Heights,Howling Acres and today, 166th.Who would have ever dreamedof a huge shopping mall at thebottom of our hill?”We published biographyexcerpts about her parents twoyears ago, and here’s one about
resdent’s Corner
G
rowng Upon PovertyHeghts
(Continued on page 2)(Continued on page 2)
Saturday, March 10 ~10:30 a.m.at the REDMOND LIBRARY15990 NE 85th Street in RedmondTOPIC:Growing Up in Old RedmondSPEAKER:Yvonne Johnson Conway, plusDVD clips withBrad Solomon
NEWLOCATiONANDTiME!!!
NEXTMEETiNG
D e b  y Q u e enY v onn e J  on s  on C on w a y
 
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2GENERALMEETiNGS
2nd Saturday of the Month10 a.m. unless otherwise stated
OLD REDMOND SCHOOLHOUSECOMMUNITY CENTER
16600 NE 80th St
2007
APRIL 14 ~
Biographer
LynLambert
on the late local sculptorDudley Carter.
MAY 12 ~ Shirley Haines
on theLake Washington shipyards
.JUNE 9 ~
RHS holds its annualpicnic at Anderson Park at noon.
SEPTEMBER 8OCTOBER 13NOVEMBER 9
...................................................
2007 e
xecuTive
B
oaRd
Judy Lang
President 
Naomi Hardy
Vice-President 
Miguel Llanos
Vice-President 
Joanne Westlund
Treasurer 
Margaret Wiese
CorrespondingSecretary 
Beryl Standley 
Recording Secretary 
B
oaRd
 
of
d
iRecToRs
Terri Gordon Tom HitzrothJon Magnussen Amo MarrDoris SchaiblePatti Simpson Ward
e
xecuTive
d
iRecToR
Beryl Standley
a
TToRney
Charles Diesen
...................................................
fRee n
ewsleTTeR
If you don't already subscribe,please sign up. Call the ofce at425.885.2919 or e-mail
mew@nwlink.com
. State yourpreference of e-mail or U.S. Mail(e-mail is cheaper for the city andthe photos look better on-line).
T
he
R
edmond
R
ecoRdeR
Published nine times annuallyMiguel Llanos
Editor 
Patti Simpson Ward
Newsletter Graphic Designer 
By 1933 they hadenough money tobuild a library on a lotdonated by theBrown family. Thebuilding still standsand today is thehome of theRedmond Chamberof Commerce.Well, they’ve come a long way and are not winding down. All of theoriginal members have passed on, but there are currently about 50members who still meet for lunch the last Friday of each month. Due tothe generosity of
Audrey Gorlick’s
grandnephew the club has enoughmoney to continue their tradition of awarding a $1,000 scholarship eachyear to a Redmond High School graduate. Next on their agenda is a lastingremembrance (to be decided) of their organization that will be dedicatedon their 100th anniversary in 2009.The women who have been part of this organization are very proud ofall the accomplishments and gifts to our community, and rightfully so. They just might be the longest operating women’s service club in the state.On Saturday,
Yvonne Johnson Conway
will speak about living thepioneer life in Redmond and her mother
Perky (Perrigo) Johnson
, who wasactive in the Nokomis Club.
l
 
~ Judy Aries Lang, RHS President 
Yvonne’s contribution to Derby Day history.“When I was 17, I was chosen to be a candidate to run for Derby Queen.The Queen candidates traveled to other town celebrations and sold ticketsfor the Derby rafe (a new car). The Derby Committee ask me to drive thatnew car and the other candidates to these functions! I was rst stunned, thenhonored and just a little nervous.“All the candidates entered the parade in our ‘Queen Gowns’. Then Ichanged into my shorts to enter the 25 mile (bike) race, which takes abouttwo hours. Then it’s back into the Queen Gown for the race presentationsand the crowning of the Queen (It’s me!).“Now it is late afternoon and we go home for our annual potluck withfriends, relatives and neighbors to eat, relax and wait for the dance to startat the IOOF Hall (and
Les LaBrie
),” she writes, referring to the building that istoday’s Edwardian Antiques on Leary Way. “It was a thrill to win the race andan unbelievable honor to be the Derby Queen. What a day!”
l
(Continued from page 1)
Meetng Topc: Growng up n Poverty Heghts
(Continued from page 1)
Presdent’s Corner
Redmond's first librarians, 1928
 
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2007h
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3
T
he Truth
Bh 
 thePaddle(s)
Cvl War Vets
 
D
o you know of any Redmond pioneers whofought in the Civil War and are buried here? If so,
Chandler
and
Ruthanne Haight
, members of Sonsof Union Veterans of the Civil War and Daughtersof Union Veterans of the Civil War, would love tohear from you via
425.861.1898
or
Scotanglocelt@Juno.com
.
l
 
2007 Walkng Tours
 
RHS
board member
Tom Hitzroth
has lined up anew round of walking tours through old Redmond ~and even added a new building to the short route asthe result of new research.Space is limited, and to sign up either email Tomat
thitzroth@msn.com
or call the ofce at
425.885.2919
. The tour dates are:
April2ndMAy20thJune17thSepteMber16th
The walks run from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and startat the Justice White House across from Half-PriceBooks. They will not be held in case of rain. A $6.00per person contribution is requested which goestoward buying a bench for the walking route.
l
Buy at Staples? Help RHS
 
i
f you shop at Staples, you can help the Societyby telling the cashier that you’d like the purchaseamount to go to the Redmond Historical Societyawards account. As that account grows, theSociety gets coupons for equipment and suppliesfor the ofce.
l
Bural Plots for Sale
 
i
t’s not something we like to talk about. It’seven more awkward to write about it. But the factis most families will have to deal with cemeteryplots, and often it’s when they least want to dealwith it. So why not plan ahead AND save money byacquiring two Cedar Lawns plots donated to theSociety by the family of the late Woody Reed?If bought at Cedar Lawns, the plots would sellfor around $4,000 each. We’re trying to set a pricebut plan to sell them for much less. If interested,please contact
Beryl Standley
at 425.885.2919.
l
 
C
ongratulations to theeditor of
“Redmond Refections,” 
Naomi Hardy
,and her helpers. It isobviously written withtouches of love, respect,and nostalgia. However, there is one sentence that peopleshould know needs correcting to be accurate in thesame spirit of love, respect, and nostalgia. On page 46it states: “Every student in
Russell Kellogg’s
shop classat Redmond Junior High was familiar with the woodenpaddle on his desk, although the teacher never used it.”There are many of us who can testify that therewere two or three paddles and they were used veryeffectively when students were provocative enough toearn their attention. One had no holes in it. A second,if I remember correctly, had a few holes. The third hadseveral holes. Before bending over to receive the service,the student had an opportunity to choose the instrumentof instruction. Choose the plain board for three swats,the one with a few holes for two swats, or the one withmany holes for only one swat. Mr. Kellogg had powerfulforearms covered with much dark hair. Whichever choicewas made, the earned punishment hurt! However, thelessons were well learned!I recall when he left the shop for 15 minutes one dayand came back to nd most us in the midst of an eraseror spitball or some other ying object ght. We all linedup, the pleading innocents and the sorrowful guilty totake our equal measure.Today the use of a paddle in classes is a “no-no”, butthat was not the case in the 1940s and he was a veryfair and effective user of that teaching tool. He gotour attention and there are many of us who use shoptools today who are grateful to Mr. Kellogg for all of histeaching lessons.
l
(Above) Russell Kellogg, c. 1944
 Redmond Junior High alumBill Kruller e-mailed us thiscolorful correction:

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