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Listen to Bob Marley

Listen to Bob Marley

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Published by OpenRoadMedia

Bob Marley’s music defined a movement and forever changed a nation. Known worldwide for their message of peace and unity, Marley’s songs—from “One Love” to “Redemption Song” to “Three Little Birds”—have touched millions of lives. This collection is the best of Bob Marley presented in three parts: “The Man,” giving an in-depth look into the life of Bob Marley; “The Music,” comprising his most memorable lyrics as well as links to many of his songs in iTunes; and “The Revolution,” containing his meditations on social equality and the Rastafari movement. Enriched with iconic photographs, Listen to Bob Marley provides insight into a reggae legend, the inspirational man behind the music.

Bob Marley’s music defined a movement and forever changed a nation. Known worldwide for their message of peace and unity, Marley’s songs—from “One Love” to “Redemption Song” to “Three Little Birds”—have touched millions of lives. This collection is the best of Bob Marley presented in three parts: “The Man,” giving an in-depth look into the life of Bob Marley; “The Music,” comprising his most memorable lyrics as well as links to many of his songs in iTunes; and “The Revolution,” containing his meditations on social equality and the Rastafari movement. Enriched with iconic photographs, Listen to Bob Marley provides insight into a reggae legend, the inspirational man behind the music.

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Publish date: Jul 3, 2012
Added to Scribd: Jan 30, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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09/17/2013

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 Marley’s Global Legacy
As the most important singer/songwriter of the 20
th
century Bob Marley has exerted anunparalleled influence among disparate populations throughout the world. New Zealand’sindigenous Maori people, for example, greeted Bob with a traditional song and danceceremony reserved for visiting dignitaries when he arrived in their country for a concertat Auckland’s Westeren Springs Stadium on April 6, 1979. Marley’s former manager, thelate Don Taylor, referred to the Maori welcoming ritual as “one of my most treasuredmemories of the impact of Bob and reggae music on the world”. On April 17, 1980 whenthe former British colony Rhodesia was officially renamed Zimbabwe and the Union Jack replaced with the red, gold, green and black Zimbabwean flag, it is said that the firstwords officially spoken in the new nation were “ladies and gentlemen, Bob Marley andthe Wailers”. Zimbabwean freedom fighters in their ongoing struggle to end minority rule
 
were strengthened by Marley’s empowering lyrics. Marley had penned a tribute to their efforts, “Zimbabwe”, which was included on the most overtly political album of hiscareer, 1979’s “Survival” and he was invited to headline their official liberationcelebrations. Zimbabwean police used teargas to control the crowds that surged throughthe gates of Harare’s Rufaro Stadium to get a glimpse of Marley onstage. As severalmembers of his entourage fled for cover, Marley, returned to the stage to perform“Zimbabwe”, the power of his words ringing with a greater urgency amidst the ensuingchaos: “
to divide and rule could only tear us apart, in everyman chest, mm - there beats aheart/so soon we'll find out who is the real revolutionaries and I don't want my people tobe tricked by mercenaries.
“There was smoke everywhere, our eyes filled with tears sowe ran off,” recalls Marcia Griffiths, who sang back up for Marley, alongside his wifeRita Marley and Judy Mowatt, as the I-Threes. “When Bob saw us the next day he smiledand said now we know who are the real revolutionaries.”A generation later a group of political refugees from Sierra Leone living in Guineanconcentration camps, traumatized by years of bloody warfare in their country, foundstrength through Marley’s music, which inspired them to form a band and write/recordtheir own songs. The Refugee All Stars won international acclaim for their 2006 debut“Living Like A Refugee” and their 2010 album “Rise and Shine”, each utilizing anamalgam of reggae, Sierra Leone’s Islamic rooted
bubu
music and West African
 goombay.
 On October 13, 2010, Victor Zamora, one of 33 Chilean miners rescued after beingtrapped in a San Jose mine for 69 days, asked to hear Marley’s “Buffalo Soldier” uponhis release. Recorded in 1980 and released in 1983 “Buffalo Soldier” recounts theatrocities of the slave trade and like so many of Marley’s songs, it highlights theimportance of relating past occurrences to present-day identities
“if you know your history then you will know where you are coming from, then you wouldn't have to ask me,who the hell do I think I am?”

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