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Table Of Contents

1.5.5 Resource-based theory (RBT)
1.5.6 Some RBT writers
1.5.7 Comments on resource-based views of strategy
1.11.2 Resolving competing objectives
1.12 Corporate governance
1.12.1 What is corporate governance?
1.12.2 The history of corporate governance
1.12.3 The combined code principles of corporate governance
1.12.4 The benefits of corporate governance
1.13 Summary
Readings
Revision Questions
2.1 Strategy and structure
LEARNING OUTCOMES
2.2 Organisational structure
2.2.1 Internal structure
2.2.2 Organisational design and contingency theory
2.2.3 Contingency theory
2.2.4 Structural characteristics
2.2.5 Strategic choice and the issue of consistency
2.2.6 Entrepreneurial organisation (Figure 2.1)
2.2.7 Functional organisation
2.2.8 Holding companies: ‘federated firms’ and franchises
2.2.9 Divisional organisation
2.2.10 Matrix organisation
2.2.11 Flexible firms, networks and complex organisation forms
2.2.12 Mintzberg’s (1983) structural configurations
2.3 Organisational culture
2.3.1 The importance of culture in organisations
2.3.2 Determinants of culture
2.3.3 Writers on culture
2.3.4 Models for categorising culture
2.3.5 Culture and control
2.4 Improving effectiveness
2.4.1 Balancing control with autonomy
2.4.2 Decentralisation
2.4.3 New venturing
2.4.4 Empowerment
2.4.5 Team working
2.4.6 Innovation
2.4.7 Organisational learning and knowledge management
2.4.8 Rosabeth Moss Kanter and entrepreneurship
2.5 The network organisation
2.5.1 An overview of network organisations
2.5.2 Forms of network relationship
2.5.3 Implications of network organisations
2.5.4 Theoretical basis of network organisations
2.5.5 Transactions cost theory
2.5.6 Transactions cost theory and network organisations
2.5.7 Network organisations and resource-based theory
2.6 Summary
3.1 Trends in the general management and structure of organisations
3.1.1 Changes in the business environment
3.1.2 International structures
3.1.3 Mergers and de-mergers
3.2 New patterns of employment
3.2.1 The flexible firm
3.2.2 Implications of flexibility for employment
3.2.3 Flexible time arrangements
3.2.4 Homeworking
3.2.5 Core and periphery workers
3.2.7 Implications for management accounting
3.2.8 A critical perspective on flexible organisations
3.3 Competition – Porter’s five forces model
3.3.1 Basic argument of the model
3.3.2 Using the model
3.3.3 Threat of entry
3.3.4 Rivalry among existing competitors
3.3.5 Pressure from substitute products
3.3.6 Bargaining power of buyers
3.3.7 Bargaining power of suppliers
3.3.8 Exercise on confectionery industry
3.3.9 Solution
3.4 An ecological perspective
3.4.1 Environmental responsibilities
3.5 Social responsibility
3.5.1 Scope of social responsibility
3.5.2 Must social responsibility conflict with benefiting shareholders?
3.6 Shareholder wealth and ethics
3.6.1 Nature of ethics
3.6.2 Example of an ethical issue
3.6.3 Friedman: profit is the sole objective
3.6.4 Sternberg: shareholder wealth is natural purpose
3.6.5 A stakeholder view of business ethics
3.6.6 An egoistical view
3.6.7 Implications of ethics for the chartered management accountant
3.7 Summary
Projects
4.1 Definition
4.2 Characteristics of a project
4.3 The project life-cycle
4.3.1 The project life-cycle phases
4.3.2 An alternative project life-cycle – iteration
4.3.3 Project approach
4.3.4 Other frameworks: 4, 5, 7 or 9?
4.4 The project as a conversion process
4.4.1 Inputs
4.4.2 Constraints
4.4.3 Outputs
4.4.4 Mechanisms
4.5 Examples of projects
4.5.1 One successful project: ongoing
4.5.2 One not so successful project
4.6 Why some projects fail
4.7 Strategy and scope
4.7.1 Strategy
4.7.2 Scope
4.8 Summary
People and Projects
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The roles of the project manager
5.3 The responsibilities of the project manager
5.3.1 Organisation
5.3.2 Planning
5.3.3 Controlling
5.4 The skills of the project manager
5.4.1 Leadership skills
5.4.2 Communication skills
5.4.3 Negotiation skills
5.4.4 Delegation skills
5.4.5 Problem-solving skills
5.4.6 Change-management skills
5.5 Project teams
5.6 Problems of team-working
5.6.1 Unclear team goals and objectives
5.6.2 Lack of team structure
5.6.3 Lack of definition of roles
5.6.4 Poor leadership
5.6.5 Poor team communication
5.6.6 Lack of commitment
5.7 Project management and team-building
5.8 Project stakeholders
5.8.1 Managing stakeholder expectations
5.9 Projects and organisation structure
5.9.1 Matrix organisations
5.10 Summary
6.1 Introduction
6.2 A definition of project management
6.3 The project management process
6.3.1 Initiation
6.3.2 Planning
6.3.3 Executing leadership
6.3.4 Controlling
6.3.5 Completing
6.4 Project planning
6.4.1 Initiation
6.4.2 Detailed project planning
6.4.3 The baseline plan
6.5 Project objective constraints
6.5.1 Project scope/functionality
6.5.2 Project schedule/time
6.5.3 Project cost
6.5.4 Customer satisfaction/quality
6.6 Summary
7.1 Setting project objectives
7.2 Identifying project proposals
LEARNING OUTCOME
7.3 Formation of project proposals
7.4 Setting project requirements
7.5 The feasibility study
7.5.1 Assessing project feasibility
7.5.2 Technical feasibility
7.5.3 Social and ecological feasibility
7.5.4 Fit with business goals
7.5.5 Financial feasibility
7.6 Types of cost
7.6.1 Capital costs
7.6.2 Revenue costs
7.6.3 Finance costs
7.7 Risk sensitivity
7.8 Financial evaluation techniques
7.9 Risk and uncertainty
7.9.1 Quantitative risk
7.9.2 Socially constructed risk
7.9.3 Qualitative risk
7.9.4 Managing risk
7.9.5 Uncertainty
7.10 SWOT analysis
7.10.1 An example of a SWOT analysis
7.10.2 A contingency plan
7.11 Summary
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Planning the project
8.3 Performing the project
8.3.1 An example – development of an information system
8.4 Monitoring and controlling the project
8.4.1 Making effective control decisions
8.4.2 PRINCE 2 methodology
8.4.3 Other project management methodologies
8.5 Project closure
8.5.1 Organising project documentation
8.5.2 Collection of receipts and making final payments
8.6 Post-completion review and audit
8.6.1 Post-project review meetings
8.6.2 Post-completion audit
8.6.3 Justifying the cost of post-completion audit
8.6.4 Continuous improvement
8.7 Summary
9.1 Introduction
9.2 The planning process
9.2.1 Benefits of planning methods
9.2.2 Communication of project planning
9.3 Gantt charts
9.4 Network analysis
9.4.1 Calculation of the EET
9.4.2 Calculation of the LET
9.4.3 Slack or float
9.6 Project evaluation and review technique (PERT)
9.7 Project management (PM) software
9.7.1 PM software functions
9.7.2 Advantages of using PM software
9.7.3 PM software pitfalls
9.8 Summary
Management
10.1 Power, authority, responsibility and delegation
10.1.1 Power and authority
10.1.2 Authority as legitimate power
10.1.3 Organisational power
10.1.4 Responsibility
10.1.5 Delegation of authority
10.2 The characteristics of leaders and managers
10.3 Personality trait theories of leadership
10.4 Management styles
10.4.1 Kurt Lewin
10.4.2 Rensis Likert
10.4.3 Tannenbaum and Schmidt
10.4.4 Robert Blake and Jane Mouton
10.5 Contingency theories of leadership
10.5.1 John Adair action-centred leadership
10.5.2 Fiedler
10.6 Situational leadership styles
10.6.1 Hersey and Blanchard
10.6.2 Richard Boyd (1987) – transformational leaders
10.7 Classical and contemporary theories of management
10.7.1 Scientific management
10.7.2 The administrative school
10.7.3 Bureaucracy: a culture, process or a form of organisation?
10.7.4 The human relations school
10.7.5 Systems theory
10.7.6 Contingency theory
10.7.7 Peter Drucker: management by objectives (MBO)
10.7.8 Modern perspectives on organisations
10.8 Managing in different cultures
10.8.1 National cultures
10.8.2 Power distance
10.8.3 Uncertainty avoidance
10.8.4 Individualism and collectivism
10.8.5 Masculinity/femininity
10.8.6 Time orientation
10.8.7 Other cultural characteristics
10.8.8 Changing behaviour
10.9 Information gathering
10.9.1 Interviews
10.9.2 Questionnaires
10.9.3 Observation
10.9.4 Other information gathering methods
10.10 Summary
11.1 Behaviour in work groups
11.1.1 Informal groups
11.1.2 Formal groups
11.1.3 Formation and development
11.1.4 Integration and organisation
11.1.5 Group dynamics and performance
11.1.6 Formal groups: roles and teams
11.1.7 Team roles – Meredith Belbin (1981)
11.1.8 Vaill (1982): high-performance teams
11.1.9 Problems with groups
11.2 Communication
11.2.1 Oral and written communication
11.3 Project meetings
11.3.1 Project status review meetings
11.3.2 Project design review meetings
11.3.3 Project problem-solving meetings
11.4 Effective meetings
11.5 The roles of team members in meetings
11.6 Problems with meetings
11.7 Post-project evaluation meeting
11.8 Project reporting
11.8.1 Project initiation document (PID)
11.8.2 Progress reporting
11.8.3 The final report
11.9 Negotiation
11.9.1 The need for negotiation
11.9.2 Negotiation approaches
11.9.3 The aim of negotiation
11.10 Summary
12.1 Objectives of internal control systems
12.2 Internal control systems
12.3 Levels of control
12.3.1 Strategic control
12.3.2 Tactical control
12.3.3 Operational control
12.4 Effective control systems
12.5 An example of a control system in practice
12.5.1 Strategic level
12.5.2 Tactical level
12.6 Health and safety
12.6.1 Safety, health and the environment
12.6.2 Safety committee and representatives
12.6.3 Managing safety
12.6.4 Working with contractors
12.6.5 Health and safety training
12.6.6 Managing health
12.6.7 Stress management
12.7 Dismissal, redundancy and job insecurity
12.7.1 Dismissal
12.8 Time management
12.8.1 Personal time management
12.8.2 Time management values
12.8.3 Time management action
12.8.4 Time scheduling
12.9 Mentoring
12.9.1 Why mentoring?
12.9.2 Benefits of mentoring
12.10 Summary
13.1 Conflict in organisations
13.1.1 The symptoms of conflict
13.1.2 Forms/sources of conflict
13.1.3 Handling conflict
13.1.4 Resolutions of industrial relations conflict
13.1.5 Managing conflict
13.2 Discipline
13.2.1 The meaning of discipline
13.2.2 Self-discipline
13.2.3 Disciplinary situations
13.2.4 Taking disciplinary action
13.2.5 Immediacy: Douglas McGregor’s ‘hot stove rule’
13.2.6 Disciplinary procedures
13.2.7 ACAS code of practice
13.2.8 Grievance procedures
13.2.9 Fairness and commitment in the work place
Diversity and Equal Opportunities
13.2.10 Diversity and equal opportunities
13.3 Summary
Revision technique
Planning
Getting down to work
Tips for the final revision phase
Format of the examination
Structure of the paper
Revision questions – mapping grid
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CIMA Integerated Management

CIMA Integerated Management

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Published by Mian Bial
CIMA BPP Study Text - Integerated Management
CIMA BPP Study Text - Integerated Management

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: Mian Bial on Jan 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/24/2014

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