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The Amazon Indigenous

The Amazon Indigenous

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Published by M.G. Edwards
This is the final article in a series about the Amazon region of Brazil featured in my illustrated picture book, Alexander the Salamander. This post is about the indigenous peoples and culture of the Amazon. Previous ones highlighted the Amazon River, the Meeting of the Waters, the rainforest, the city of Manaus, Amazon Ecopark, piranhas, and a monkey reserve. Enjoy these travelogues with photos and stories from one of the world’s mightiest rivers.
This is the final article in a series about the Amazon region of Brazil featured in my illustrated picture book, Alexander the Salamander. This post is about the indigenous peoples and culture of the Amazon. Previous ones highlighted the Amazon River, the Meeting of the Waters, the rainforest, the city of Manaus, Amazon Ecopark, piranhas, and a monkey reserve. Enjoy these travelogues with photos and stories from one of the world’s mightiest rivers.

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Published by: M.G. Edwards on Feb 02, 2013
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12/07/2013

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© 2013 Brilliance Press. All rights reserved.
-1-
This is the final article in a series about the Amazon region of Brazil featured in myillustrated picture book,  Alexander the Salamander .This post is about the indigenous  peoples and culture of the Amazon. Previous ones highlighted the  Amazon River  ,the  Meeting of the Waters ,the rainforest  ,the city of   Manaus
, 
 Amazon Ecopark  ,  piranhas ,  and a monkey reserve.Enjoy these travelogues with photos and stories from one of the
world’s might 
iest rivers.
 During our trip to the Amazon in July 2008, we took a daytrip to a small indigenousvillage near the Rio Negro. Built to attract tourists, the village was quite idyllic, and itsinhabitants performed dances and sold handicrafts to visitors who wanted to experiencelocal indigenous culture.Our guide told me that the villagers belonged to the Baniwa indigenous group who hadmigrated from their original home upriver to this place in order to earn a better livelihood.Other members of the tribal group still living near the Brazil-Colombian border received
financial support from them. According to Brazil’s 
Instituto Socioambiental,an estimated15,200 Baniwa reside in the tri-border area of Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Manyreportedly live in poor conditions and are subjected to human rights abuses such asencroachment on their land by illegal loggers and poachers.We disembarked from our tour boat and walked among wood and thatched-roof buildingsto a large hall. We sat down on benches lining the hall and waited for the Baniwaperformance to begin. Ten youths, five women and five men, performed songs and dance
 
© 2013 Brilliance Press. All rights reserved.
-2-
in ceremonial dress. The men played upbeat melodies on large wood flutes and pipes andchanted skyward as the women danced with them. Nothing represented the spirit of harmony between the indigenous and the rainforest to me more than their haunting songsthat still echo in my mind.As the dance grew livelier and less somber, the men pulled spectators from the audienceand invited them to perform. My wife joined in. She tried to play the flute but was toopreoccupied trying to dance! I opted out but took a photo afterwards with some of the

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