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The Crimson White 2.4.13

The Crimson White 2.4.13

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Published by The Crimson White
The Crimson White is a student published newspaper that seeks to inform the University of Alabama. Roll Tide.
The Crimson White is a student published newspaper that seeks to inform the University of Alabama. Roll Tide.

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Published by: The Crimson White on Feb 04, 2013
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By Mark Hammontree
Contributing Writer
Anthony Grant, The University of Alabamamen’s basketball coach, is competing with col-lege basketball coaches across the countryto win $100,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs of West Alabama in the Infiniti Coaches’ CharityChallenge.For its third year, Infiniti has teamed up withESPN, the NCAA and the National Associationof Basketball Coaches to present the InfinitiCoaches’ Charity Challenge, a Final Four styletournament including 48 men’s college basketballcoaches and their chosen charities from acrossthe country.
Monday, February 4, 2013 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 82
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................7
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................9Puzzles .................... 11Classifieds ...............11
Rain
55º/45º
Tuesday 63º/39º
Chance of rain
 
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CULTURE
PAGE 7 The UA Department of Theatre andDance to premiere first spring show 
‘DESIGN FOR A LIVING’
NEWS
| SEXUAL HEALTH
SPORTS
 
| BASKETBALL
Alabama wins 1st game at Vanderbilt in 23 years
By Marquavius Burnett 
Sports Editor
NASHVILLE, Tenn.—An11-game losing streak thatspanned 23 years crumbledSaturday.The Alabama men’s bas-ketball team had not wonin Memorial Gymnasiumsince 1990, but the CrimsonTide fought hard and foughtback to defeat the VanderbiltCommodores.The Tide’s victory atVanderbilt was the first sinceWimp Sanderson led his teamto a 65-56 win on Feb. 3, 1990.“I couldn’t be prouder of ourteam,” head coach AnthonyGrant said. “This was a bigroad win for us. We all knowthe history of this series. TheUniversity of Alabama’s lastwin here was in 1990, and we’rehappy for our team and ourplayers, as well as all the play-ers that came before these guys.I’m not trying to over-dramatizeit, but it was important to usto come in here and play welltoday.”It was more than a win forAlabama. It showed the Tidehad the ability to fight throughadversity and road struggles.Vanderbilt shot 57.9 per-cent (11-19) from the field and71.4 percent (5-7) from behindthe arc in the first half. TheCommodores were more thanon fire and every time Alabamamade a run, Vanderbilt hit atimely 3.Vanderbilt (8-12, 2-6 SEC)led by as many as 11 points,51-40, with 7:10 remaining. ButAlabama went on a 16-4 run,taking its first lead of the con-test when Trevor Lacey hit a 3point shot with 58 seconds leftto make the score 56-54. Laceyfinished with 17 points, includ-ing nine in the last five minutes.Alabama closed the game onan 18-3 run over the final sevenminutes and made clutch freethrows to seal the deal.
Nashville win leavesTide 6-2 in SEC play
SEE
BASKETBALL
PAGE 2
Coach Granttakes part incharity votingtournament
 The Vanderbilt Hustler | Bosley Jarrett
 Alabama overcame Vanderbilt in the second half of Saturday’s game.
NEWS
 
| BASKETBALL
MovieFest brings drama, comedy to Ferguson Center Thursday
By Courtney Stinson
Staff Reporter
Aspiring UA filmmakersexplored our deepest fears,insecurities, social issues andeven a day in the life of anaccomplished pooch in filmsof five minutes or less at theCampus MovieFest Finale, theculmination of an intense weekof competitors creating shortfilms for the competition.Of 62 submissions CMFreceived, the top 16 moved onto the Finale to compete forthe Director’s Chair trophiesfor Best Comedy, Best Dramaand Best Picture. The winnerof each category will continueto CMF Hollywood to screenagainst winners from otherschools.The title for Best Comedywent to “No Paper, No Plastic,”the adventures of a would-bemugger in training and hisfailed attempts to rob unsus-pecting victims. Best Dramawent to “Rise,” the story of a soldier’s struggle to make alife or death decision duringcombat. “Person-Able,” a com-mercial for a company thatoffers human services in theplace of technology, took homethe director’s chair for BestPicture.This year’s CMF featuredmore dramas than previousyears and the competition wasstiff for Best Drama winner“Rise.” “Rise” producer HunterBarcroft, a junior majoring intelecommunication and film,commended the competitorsfor their own contributions tothe category.“[The competition] was real-ly tough, and, honestly, it wasanybody’s game,” he said. “I’mcompletely blessed.”“Person-Able” directorsCayce Savage, a junior major-ing in psychology, and LeahDunkel, a junior majoring inTCF and psychology, competedin CMF for the third time thisyear. Both of their previoussubmissions placed in the top16, but this is their first submis-sion to win.Savage and Dunkel had theidea for “Person-Able” whilereturning home from lastyear’s Finale. They attributedtheir creative success to speak-ing in “British old lady voices”and the help of Corey Reevesand Jordan DeWitt.
Submitted
If Alabama baskeball coach Anothny Grant wins thecontest, he will donate to the local Boys & Girls Club.
CW | Caitlin Trotter
 A total of 62 teams of student filmmakers made a movie in a week for the Campus MovieFest competition. The 16 best films were shownThursday night in the Ferguson ballroom.
Finale featured 16student-made films
SEE
GRANT
PAGE 2SEE
MOVIEFEST
PAGE 8
ULTURE
 
| CAMPUS MOVIEFEST
Online elmination-style contesto last 8 weeks, ends on March 11
Consent a campus issue
W
ithout consent, any sex-ual act is sexual assault.Yet knowing how to gain and giveconsent for sexual acts is thebiggest sexual health problemfacing UA students, according toUniversity of Alabama officials.Wanda Burton, peer educa-tion coordinator at the Women’sResource Center, explained con-sent must be freely given forevery act to avoid a possibility of sexual assault.“You need to be talking aboutconsent in a space where you feelcompletely comfortable, whenthere is no persuasion involved,”Burton said. “If you are gettingsomeone drunk to have sex withthem, that is sexual assault.”Jessica Vickery, assistantdirector of Health Education andPromotion at the Student HealthCenter, said she believes sexualconsent is the number one sexualhealth issue among students atthe University.“Consent. Hands down. Noone’s knows if they’ve given it, noone knows if they’ve asked it. Itis the one thing I spend the mosttime [on] in programs with ques-tions,” Vickery said. “Studentsare always like, ‘If I did this,did I get it?’ I think the issue of consent has become our biggestissue. Explaining the absence of no does not mean yes, and youhave to get it every time for everyact, and just because you’ve doneit before doesn’t mean you can doit again.”
SEE
CONSENT
PAGE 3
CW | Shannon Auvil
By Kyle Dennan and Chandler Wright |
CW Staff
According to UA officials,understanding the nature of consent is the number onesexual health problemon campus.
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
 
LUNCH
Beef BrisketMashed PotatoesSquashCauliflower Cheddar SoupVegetable Nachos(Vegetarian)
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ON THE MENU
LAKESIDETUESDAY 
 What:
Bama Art House pres-ents ‘Anna Karenina’
 Where:
Bama Theatre
 When:
7:30 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
 
A Tuscaloosa Eveningof African Film
 Where:
 
Bama Theatre
 When:
 
6 p.m.
 What:
 
Relive the SEC Cham-pionship
 Where:
 
Ferguson CenterBallroom
 When:
 
7 p.m.
 What:
 
UATD presents ‘De-sign for Living’
 Where:
 
Allen Bales Theatre
 When:
 
7:30 p.m.
 WEDNESDA
 What:
Ribbon Cutting atWhich Wich
 Where:
1403 UniversityBoulevard
 When:
10:30 a.m.
 What:
Brown Bag LectureSeries
 Where:
Ferguson CenterForum
 When:
noon - 1 p.m.
 What:
Men’s Basketball v.Auburn
 Where:
Auburn, Ala.
 When:
7 p.m.
ON CAMPUS
GO
GO
Page 2• Monday,February 4, 2013
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
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DINNER
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BURKE
“I thought the fight in thesecond half; the resiliency wasawesome,” Grant said. “AndrewSteele, our senior, did a tremen-dous job throughout the game,keeping our guys focused andmotivated and on-task in termsof what we needed to do. Wealways talk about it being a40-minute game that we have toplay, stay the course and play allthe way through.”Steele, a fifth-year seniorwho had lost here twice, carriedAlabama offensively along withLacey. Steele made three clutch3-pointers to keep Alabamaclose and fuel the Tide’s sec-ond half run. But his biggestcontribution came during everyhuddle.“I tried to tell them to keepfighting,” Steele, who scored aseason-high 13 points, said. “Atevery media timeout, we had cutthe lead by a certain margin. I just kept reminding them, ‘Justchip away, chip away.’ We keptchipping away. … I had full con-fidence that we would win thegame. I didn’t know how it wouldcome about, but not for one sec-ond did our team stop believingthat we would get the win.”The Crimson Tide (14-7, 6-2SEC), will next be in action Feb.6 when it travels to take on theAuburn Tigers. Tipoff is slatedfor 7 p.m. and will be televisedon the SEC Network.
BASKETBALL
FROM PAGE 1
Rally in second half gives Tide edge, win
CW Staff 
The ninth-ranked Alabamawomen’s tennis team earneda 6-1 victory over SMU onSunday at the NorthwoodCountry Club. With the win,the Crimson Tide moves to 4-0on the season while the lossdrops the Mustangs to 1-3.“It was good to be battle test-ed on the road this weekend,”said Alabama head coachJenny Mainz. “Both TCU andSMU were good teams and thematches were competitive. Wekeep talking about finding ourway back into matches whenwe are down, and we did agood job of that all weekend.We had to work for today’swin. I thought we competedwell and fought in every spot.It was a good test for us, andwe got some good qualitymatches under our belts.”Alabama got wins in dou-bles from courts two and threeto claim the first point of thematch. From the No. 2 spot,senior Antonia Foehse andfreshman Maya Jansen toppedSMU senior Edyta Ciepluchaand freshman Elena Fayner,8-3, while the win on courtthree went in favor of Tidesophomores Yasmeen Ebadaand Emily Zabor, 8-2, oversophomore Holly Verner andfreshman Hristina Dishkova.In singles, Alabamaposted victories on courtstwo through six to seal theteam win. Tide senior AlexaGuarachi, playing on courttwo, came back from a first-set loss to beat Malyarchikova,4-6, 6-3, 10-7 while Jansendowned freshman VasziliszaBulgakova, 6-3, 6-3, on courtthree. On court four, Foehsecollected a 6-0, 6-4 victory overFayner while Zabor notched a6-1, 6-1 victory over Verner atthe No. 5 spot. Wrapping playup on court six was freshmanNatalia Maynetto, who toppedDishkova, 6-4, 6-0.Next up, Alabama travelsto Charlottesville, Va., forthe 2013 ITA National TeamIndoor Championships, whichwill begin on Friday, Feb. 8.
9th-ranked Tide rolls over SMU, 6-1
From MCT Campus
WASHINGTON – Fears of arecession seemed to evaporateas the nation added 157,000 net jobs last month and other keyeconomic data improved, boost-ing major stocks to their highestlevel in more than five years.Economists and investorswere heartened by the LaborDepartment’s jobs reportFriday, which suggested thatgrowth accelerated at the endof last year. The new economicreadings – a mix of federaland private data – contrastedwith Wednesday’s governmentreport that the economy con-tracted at a 0.1 percent annualrate in the last three months of 2012.The January jobs report,which also showed the unem-ployment rate ticked up to7.9 percent, was about in linewith analysts’ expectations.But revised job-growth figuresshowed the labor market wasmuch stronger at the end of 2012than previously thought, indi-cating surprising momentum in2013.Revised government datashowed that the economy added335,000 more jobs than original-ly estimated during all of 2012,including an additional 150,000in the last quarter of the year.That was on top of the previ-ously reported fourth-quarter job growth of 603,000 and 2012growth of 2.2 million. The newfigures mean that, on average,the economy added 181,000 jobseach month last year, up fromthe earlier estimate of 153,000.The higher revisions, inparticular, encouraged trad-ers on Wall Street, sending theDow Jones industrial averageover the 14,000-point mark forthe first time since 2007. “Theeconomy’s the little enginethat could,” said JJ Kinahan,chief derivatives strategist forTD Ameritrade. “It’s slowlyclimbing.”The small shortfall in thefourth quarter’s gross domesticproduct – the value of all goodsand services produced nation-wide – marked the first contrac-tion since the Great Recessionended in mid-2009 and raisedworries that another downturnwas ahead. Many economistsquickly said the report appearedto be an anomaly driven by fearsof the “fiscal cliff,” and Friday’sdata gave more credence to thatview.“We had some pretty good jobgrowth in the fourth quarter,”said Stuart Hoffman, chief econ-omist at PNC Financial Services.“You don’t get that kind of jobgrowth if the economy is legiti-mately flat on its behind.”Still, job growth has beenmodest compared with previ-ous recoveries, and economistssaw little in January’s report tosuggest that hiring would pickup soon. And the January figurealso looked worse in comparisonto the revised December figure.The unemployment rate rosefrom 7.8 percent in December.“I think it’s going to be a toughslog here,” said Joshua Shapiro,chief U.S. economist for MFRInc. “There are plenty of head-winds out there for the econo-my. The cost of hiring somebodyis great, with benefit costs andeverything, and unless com-panies really absolutely needsomeone, they’re not going tohire.”Last month, the private sec-tor added 166,000 jobs, but over-all growth was pulled down bya net loss of 9,000 government jobs, the Labor Departmentsaid. Sectors that showed jobgains included retail, construc-tion and health care, whiletransportation and warehous-ing declined.“It’s a bit of an underwhelm-ing report,” said Peter McHenry,an assistant economics profes-sor at the College of Williamand Mary. “We’ve still got just avery slow recovery – certainly arecovery – but not anything tobe really excited about.”The construction industryadded 28,000 jobs in January.Some economists had expectedmore, given the damage fromsuperstorm Sandy last fall. Butthe increase was “validationthe housing market contin-ues to gain momentum,” saidDiane Swonk, chief economist atMesirow Financial.Since bottoming out inJanuary 2011 after the hous-ing collapse, the constructionindustry has added 296,000 jobs,the Labor Department said.One-third of that gain came inthe past four months. “A quar-ter ago, you’d say the housingmarket had stabilized,” Kinahansaid. “Now you can say the hous-ing market is starting to grow.”In another positive signfor the sector, the CommerceDepartment said Friday thatconstruction spending increased0.9 percent in December fromthe previous month, to an annu-al rate of $885 billion.The manufacturing sectorexpanded for the second straightmonth, the Institute for SupplyManagement said. Jobs in themanufacturing sector haveshown little change since thesummer, the Labor Departmentsaid. And consumer confidencealso improved slightly lastmonth after Washington policy-makers avoided most of the taxincreases slated to kick in Jan. 1as part of the fiscal cliff.The closely watched con-sumer sentiment index fromThomson Reuters and theUniversity of Michigan rose to73.8 in January from 72.9 theprevious month. One tax changethat was not avoided – the expi-ration of the two-year payrolltax cut – held down consumerconfidence, said Richard Curtin,the survey’s chief economist.The higher payroll tax, whichstarted showing up in paychecksin early January, was a drag on job growth, economists said.More potential problems arelooming as Congress must dealwith automatic spending cutsset to hit March 1. And anoth-er battle over the nation’s debtlimit could be coming this sum-mer after Congress approved atemporary increase last month.Swonk said such “fiscal landmines” could derail the recov-ery. Although the nation doesnot appear headed toward reces-sion again – commonly definedas two straight quarters of con-traction – the economy remainsfragile, Swonk said.
Jobs numbers kindle optimism for recovery
From MCT Campus
As an Alabama boy spenthis fifth day holed up in anunderground bunker with hiskidnapper, authorities thankedthe man Saturday for caringfor the child but remainedtight-lipped about whether hehad made any demands.Dale County Sheriff WallyOlson said negotiators werein “constant contact” with thekidnapping suspect, believedto be 65-year-old Jimmy LeeDykes, whom neighbors char-acterized as menacing andprone to violent outbursts.One neighbor said Dykes blud-geoned her dog to death with alead pipe after it roamed ontohis property.Speaking through a 4-inchventilation pipe, Dykes toldnegotiators he has electricheaters and blankets in thebunker, Olson said.Authorities also providedcoloring books, toys and medi-cation for the boy, believed tobe 5 years old and identified byneighbors as Ethan. He is saidto have Asperger’s syndromeand attention-deficit hyperac-tivity disorder.“I want to thank him fortaking care of our child,” Olsonsaid in a televised news con-ference Saturday. “That’s veryimportant.”Olson declined to answera reporter’s question aboutwhether Dykes had made anydemands.The hostage situation beganTuedsay afternoon, authoritessaid, when a gunman snatchedEthan from a school bus aftershooting and killing the driver,Charles Albert Poland Jr.Dykes’ neighbor MichaelCreel told the Associated Presshe suspected the standoff wasa way to make a political state-ment. “I believe he wants torant and rave about politicsand government. He’s veryconcerned about his prop-erty. He doesn’t want his stuff messed with,” Creel said.
Alabama abduction: Sheriff thanks man for ‘taking care of our child’
 
Burton said students shouldavoid talking about consentin an environment where oneparty is trying to persuadethe other to concede, as thiscan also be a form of sexualassault.“Just because you have con-sent to do something doesn’tmean you have consent to doeverything, and just becauseyou got consent in the pastdoesn’t mean you have con-sent now or in the future.Consent is for an act,” Burtonsaid. “Consent has to be freelygiven, informed and everyonehas to be able to give consent.”Vickery said that whenit comes to sexual assault,false accusations are notpossible, despite culturalbeliefs otherwise.“Some people think thereare false accusations. There’sreally no false accusations.If someone feels they didn’tgive consent, then they didn’tgive consent,” Vickery said.“Whether it’s coerced ormanipulated, that’s still notconsent. I think right nowthat’s really a big issue on ourcampus and students are real-ly confused about it.”According to UAPD’s mostrecent Annual Campus Safetyreport, there were 16 forciblesexual offenses reported oncampus between 2008 and 2011.Fourteen of those occurred inresidence halls.Ashley Frazier, a seniormajoring in music therapyand former resident advisorin Parham Hall, said RAs aretrained to deal with incidencesof sexual assault.“I did deal with situationsin training where a sexualassault had occurred andthe girl came to talk to me,”Frazier said. “In that situation,you would try to get as muchof their story as possible. Thenyou would contact supervi-sors, the authorities and coun-seling if needed.”Although Frazier never hadto use her training, she saidthe University’s status as a“party school” pervades a cul-ture of sexual assault.“Being a party school isn’thelping us at all,” Frazier said.“Being able to separate schoollife, dorm life and partyingwould be helpful.”Additionally, Burton empha-sized the importance of main-taining a campus culture thatdoesn’t ostracize victims of sexual assault.“It’s important to change theculture so that, one, womenare not victimized in the firstplace, and two, when sexualassault does happen, thevictim doesn’t have to be re-traumatized when coming for-ward,” she said.Although many studentsbelieve they’re only option fol-lowing sexual assault is press-ing criminal charges, Vickerysaid many students who findthemselves confused or con-cerned about a sexual act canuse other avenues to addressthe concern of sexual assaulton campus.“I think right now that is thebiggest issue because you havea lot of people that walk awayconfused about whether or notwhat just happened was okay,”Vickery said. “I think that if they’re questioning whetheror not that’s okay it means thatit wasn’t okay, but they don’tknow legally where to go. Mostpeople don’t feel comfortable[pressing charges], but youdon’t have to press charges;you can go through judicialaffairs.”Frazier emphasized howimportant it is for women oncampus to know how to avoidsexual assault and where to goif they feel victimized.“As a woman on campus, it’sdefinitely good to have knowl-edge about what to do if thissituation arises and how toavoid it,” Frazier said. “I feellike I have that information.You learn it as you go throughcollege.”Burton pointed to the needfor comprehensive sex edu-cation during and after highschool, saying this could helpstudents understand theimportance of gaining consentfor every act.“It would be great if we hadcomprehensive sex educationat the high school and collegelevel,” Burton said.However, Frazier said shewas skeptical of mandatededucation around this issue.“They do Alcohol 101, butstudents don’t really take itseriously,” Frazier said. “If they did that for sexual assault,I feel like students would treatit like a joke. I think it’s betterto have events on campus thatstudents can go to if they’reinterested.”Although Vickery concededBurton’s view that UA stu-dents need to be better edu-cated about sexual consent,she said she doesn’t think UAstudents are more uneducatedthan students at other univer-sities nationwide.“I don’t honestly think UAstudents are any different thanany students in the country.We might be a little bit conser-vative, but that doesn’t meanour issues are any differentthan anywhere else,” Vickerysaid. “People elsewhere mightbe more open to talk aboutit, but that doesn’t mean thatthey know what consent is.It’s not clear. We’ve done a lotof research about it and wehaven’t found a comprehen-sive consent program nation-ally. They have a lot of thesame issues of a lot of otherschools.”When it comes down to it,Vickery said she hopes hercampus educational programshelp teach students to listen tothemselves when it comes tosexual acts.“Students need to know tolisten to themselves. I knowthat sounds crazy, but to knowto listen to themselves andif they feel something isn’tright to speak up and say noor to ask,” Vickery said. “Thatneeds to become part of thedialog that students are hav-ing going forward in whateversexual acts they are choosingto partake in.”
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Monday, February 4, 2013
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Page 3
By Sarah Robinson
Contributing Writer
The Elliot Society, a com-munity service-based UAhonor society, is acceptingapplications for membershipuntil Feb. 15.The organization is namedin honor of the late CarlElliott, a former UA SGApresident who later becamean Alabama congress-man in the U.S. House of Representatives. The govern-ment official focused greatlyon bettering educationalopportunities.The group recognizes “stu-dents, faculty and alumni whohave made significant lead-ership contributions to thecampus, community, state andnation in areas of social andcultural progress and whoportray a spirit of the idealsheld by Congressman Elliott,”according to the UA HonorSociety website.Bianca Taylor, the presi-dent of the Elliot Society, saidthe group accepts studentsregardless of major or gradepoint average.“Our mission is to pro-mote education within andaround the community, sowe want to give everyone afair chance to volunteer andmake an impact,” Taylorsaid. “We know in order tobe a well-rounded personyou have to balance commu-nity service, extracurricularactivities and academics.”Taylor said the group hasbig plans for the semes-ter. The Elliot Society isparticipating in a statewidevolunteer program called theCollege Goal Sunday on Feb.24. The program provides freeinformation and assistance tostudents and families who areapplying for financial aid forsecondary education.“Financial advisors fromTuscaloosa, Stillman, Sheltonand UA will help high schoolseniors in the community of Tuscaloosa, Birmingham andother areas complete theirFAFSA,” Taylor said.The advisors can completeit in about 20 minutes for free,Taylor said.Undre Philips, a sophomoremajoring in secondary edu-cation and social sciences, joined the honor society inspring 2012.“I decided to become a mem-ber because I wanted to findmy niche with both commu-nity service and educationalinitiative,” Philips said.He said the Elliot Societyis the only honor society thatparticipates in College GoalSunday.“We are really tryingto make an impact in theTuscaloosa city schools,”Philips. “We can be the initia-tors future academic excellingstudents.”Dana Green, a senior major-ing in human developmentand family studies, joined thegroup her sophomore year.She said she looks forwardto College Goal Sunday everyyear.“I love College Goal Sunday.It’s nice to know that I amhelping someone else goto school like I am going toschool,” Green said.She encourages more peo-ple to join and contribute tothe program.“If we had more people inthe group, we could makeCollege Goal Sunday moreknown and help more people,”she said.Anyone interested in apply-ing for the Elliot Society canemail Taylor at brtaylor2@crimson.ua.edu for moreinformation. Online applica-tions for the Elliot Societyare also available online atprehealth.ua.edu.
Elliot Society aims to educate Tuscaloosa community
Service-based honor society is looking for applicants interested in ‘making an impact’ until Feb. 15
It’s important to change the culture so that, one, women are not vic-timized in the first place, and two, when sexual assault does happen,the victim doesn’t have to be re-traumatized when coming forward.
— Wanda Burton
Our mission is to promote education within and around the com-munity, so we want to give everyone a fair chance to volunteer andmake an impact.
— Bianca Taylor
ONSENT
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A trains RAs to dealith sexual offenses
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FACTS
• The Elliot Society focuseson better educationalopportunities• Applications are dueFeb. 15• Email brtaylor2@crim-son.ua.edu for moreinformation
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