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Hydrocephalus behaviour

Hydrocephalus behaviour

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Published by Shine Charity

Many of the calls we receive are about behaviour. Unfortunately, as parents, our ability to manage our child’s behaviour seems to be one of those things that identifies us as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ parents, which is why when things seem to be going wrong it is often distressing. The first thing to remember is that all parents have difficulties with their child’s behaviour sometimes and the second is that though we can’t control children’s behaviour, we can manage it.

Many of the calls we receive are about behaviour. Unfortunately, as parents, our ability to manage our child’s behaviour seems to be one of those things that identifies us as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ parents, which is why when things seem to be going wrong it is often distressing. The first thing to remember is that all parents have difficulties with their child’s behaviour sometimes and the second is that though we can’t control children’s behaviour, we can manage it.

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Published by: Shine Charity on Feb 04, 2013
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09/17/2013

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Behaviour
shinecharity.org.ukinfo@shinecharity.org.uk42 Park RoadPeterboroughPE1 2UQ
01733 555988
Many of the calls we receive are about behaviour.Unfortunately, as parents, our ability to manage our child’s
behaviour seems to be one of those things that identies us
as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ parents, which is why when things seem
to be going wrong it is often distressing. The rst thing toremember is that all parents have difculties with their child’s
behaviour sometimes and the second is that though we can’tcontrol children’s behaviour, we can manage it.
How hydrocephalus may impact on learning andbehaviour
Children with hydrocephalus
typically have problems with
understanding language,
concentration, short term memoryand processing information. All of 
these, potentially, can have an
impact on behaviour. If you can ‘tremember instructions then youwon’t be able to carry them out.If you have trouble transferringknowledge to new situations itmay be that you can do somethingin one place but not another. If youdon’t understand jokes your friendsmay think you‘re a bit ‘odd’. Theimpact that hydrocephalus can
have on learning and behaviour
varies with each individual.Some people may have very fewproblems, where as in others theconsequences can be much moreserious. It is important to remember
that children with hydrocephalus
often have a number of speciclearning difculties, which maymean that they learn in a different
way, and need different strategies
 
to help them. Additionally, if 
children are struggling at school,
either academically or with their
social relationships this can
have a detrimental effect on self-esteem, which in itself can causebehavioural difculties. If you think this may be an issue it is importantto talk to your child’s school.Human behaviour is extremelycomplicated. Psychologists,
sociologists, philosophers,educationalists, politicians and
many other groups have studied,analysed and argued over many
years about how and why we
behave in particular ways. This hasled to a multitude of theories abouthow behaviour can be managedand in recent years numeroustelevision programmes and bookswhich often make it look veryeasy! Parents, and teachers,often feel de-skilled when faced
with a child who does not behave
appropriately. This, in turn, can lead to the situationgetting worse as parents get moreand more frustrated and childrenfeel more powerful but also lesssecure, making their behavioureven more extreme. In childrenand adults with developmentaldifculties it becomes even morecomplicated as they may not reactin the way we would expect.
Strategies for managingchallenging behaviour
 All the manuals and programmes
necessarily ignore individual
circumstances and personalities,some will argue that these aren’trelevant. It is, however, verydifcult to give a standard recipefor improving children’s behaviour.Every situation is different and may
require different strategies, butthere are ways that we can begin
to work out what is going wrongand how to put it right.
Behaviour
Firstly, try to detach yourself fromthe situation a little. This is noteasy but try to see it as a problem
to be solved and approach it
‘scientically’.Make a list of the behaviourswhich you are nding difcult,then prioritise them from themost to the least troubling.
 
There are four strategies,which are particularly useful;
Routine
- the more established aroutine the less likely a child is to try tochange it. You may need a ‘going toschool’ routine, a ‘what to do whenyou come home’ routine, a ‘bedtime’routine. In fact, wherever you noticea time that causes problems, try aroutine. Routines are particularlyimportant for children with short-term memory problems. Repetitionenables them to remember whatto do and allows them to be moreindependent.
Consistency 
- this ties into routinesbut also includes how we respond
to a behaviour. If we always ignore‘Johnny’ when he shouts then
eventually he will stop shouting, if we only ignore it now and again then
he will learn that it works sometimesand he keeps trying.
Look for the Positive, Ignore theNegative sometimes
- we have
to make a real effort to notice the
positives but when you do notice thatyour child is behaving appropriately,
make sure they know you’ve noticed.
Reward good behaviour, however
 At this point you should have some
ideas about what triggers thebehaviour, how it stops, and what
the child gets from it. Now you are
in a better position to try to change
it. This will take time. Your child may
have been practising this behaviour
for several years. It is unrealistic toexpect it to stop immediately. You
and your child will need to learnnew behaviours to replace the one
you want to stop. Then try to work out whatthe child is getting from thisbehaviour. Is it attention? Dothey enjoy the fuss? Do they gettheir own way? Do they avoiddoing something else?
Concentrate on the behaviour
at the top of the list and make
a note of anything which
might be relevant. When does
it happen? Where does it
happen? Is any other particular
person involved? How oftendoes it happen? What happensbefore? What happens after?How do other people react?
How does it stop? You may
need to observe for a few days

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