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2007 Changing Army Profile

2007 Changing Army Profile

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The Changing Profile of the Army (United States)
The Changing Profile of the Army (United States)

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Published by: Single Soldiers Rights on Feb 15, 2009
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06/16/2009

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ChangingProfleArmy
Theo the
 
2
Ofce of Army Demographics
T
he demographics of the All-Volunteer U.S. Army have changedsubstantially over the past 21 years. Changes that haveoccurred in the general U.S. population over the past several years
are reected in the changing demographics of the U.S. Army.
Today’s active duty Army is more representative of the U.S.population of high school and college educated individuals thanwas the Army of the past. The percentage of Hispanic Soldiers
in the Army has increased signicantly over the years, while the
percentage of Black Soldiers has started to decline from all timehighs. Enlisted accessions continue to be primarily high school
graduates, but the more recent Army recruits are scoring higher onthe Armed Forces Qualication Test (AFQT) than did recruits of thepast. Furthermore, today’s Army consists of higher percentagesof females, Hispanics, and single Soldiers than did the Army of 21
years ago.The percentage of minorities serving in Army civilian jobs has
also increased signicantly over the past several years for all gradelevels. The representation of women in Army civilian jobs, althoughfar less than their male counterparts, is also on the rise.
Note: Unless otherwise stated, the data in this report is based on numbers provided by the Army to the Defense Manpower Data Center, and is valid as of September 30, 2006.
“I rmly believe the strength of our Army comes from our diversity.” 
 – Statement made by Army Chief of Staff Gen. George W. Casey,Jr.at Senior Leader Diversity Breakfast, 29 Nov 07.
 
3
Ofce of Army Demographics
Today’s Army is considerably smaller than it was 21 years ago; however, many of the demo
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graphic characteristics of the previously large force are similar to today’s smaller Army.Over the past 21 years, as the roles and mis
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sions of the Army have changed to meet theever changing challenges associated with pro
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tecting the nation, the number of Soldiers nec
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essary to accomplish its mission and goals haschanged. However, the emphasis on recruitingand training qualied Soldiers has remained atop priority for the Army. The educational cre
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dentials of today’s enlisted recruits are similar tothose of yesteryears. For example, in FY06 ap
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proximately 8 out of every 10 enlisted accessions were high school diploma (HSD) recipientscompared to 9 out of 10 in FY85. Of those recruits who were not HSD recipients, many had aGraduate Equivalent Diploma (GED). Thus, the formal education of new recruits continues tobe a minimum requirement of a high school education.Emphasis on quality is further noted with regard tothe performance of new recruits on the Armed ForcesQualication Test (AFQT), an entrance exam given torecruits prior to their ofcially entering the Army. Theexam consists of a battery of tests designed to evaluatebasic knowledge in several areas deemed important for success in the Armed Forces. Since FY85, applicants scoring in the top three test score cat
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egories decreased slightly from 63% to 61% in FY06.As a percentage of new (Non-Prior Service) enlisted accessions, the representation of fe
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males signicantly increased between FY85and FY95 (13% to 19%), but showed a slightdecrease in FY06. Although Army policy pre
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cludes women from serving in most CombatArms specialties, females continue to make upsignicant percentages of Combat Service andCombat Service Support branches.
020406080100
FY06FY95FY85TSC I-IIIA**HSDG*
Education Credentials of Enlisted Recruits
91%94%81%63%69%61%
*High School Diploma Recipients**Test Score Category I-IIIA
FY85 FY95 FY06
119,121
91%63%
57,401
94%69%
69,395
81%
61%
Enlisted
Non-Prior ServiceAccessions
High SchoolDiplomaRecipient*Test ScoreCategory I-IIIA
0%100%
FemalesMales
FY06
69,395
FY95
57,262
FY85
119,121
Non-Prior Service (NPS) Enlisted Accessions
75%50%25%
87%81% 83%13%19%17%
E
nlistEd
A
ccEssions
*Percentages based on NPS accessions minus Tier Two Attrition Screen (TTAS) Program.

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