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The Tech Talk 2.7.13

The Tech Talk 2.7.13

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The Tech Talk 2.7.13
The Tech Talk 2.7.13

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Published by: PhillipMichaelLeblanc on Feb 06, 2013
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02/15/2013

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AUSTIN VINING
Associate Editor
A line o masked students could beseen entering the Tonk Tuesday night,waiting to try their hand at a game o poker or hit the dance oor at Tech’sfrst Mardi Gras Masquerade.Union Board secretary ChelseaDavenport, a senior chemistry major,explained Mardi Gras Masquerade asa semi-ormal casino night put on byresidential lie and Union Board.Previously the two organizationshave paired together to throw a similarevent, Rolling in Vegas, but chose toalter the theme this year.“We did something dierent andspiced it up,” Davenport said. “Theevent being a masquerade put a twiston things and gave the students some-thing dierent. I think it was a successor sure.”She said there were a lot o unmasks oating around near the danceoor, which was disc jockeyed by Ver-tigo.As a member o Union Board, Dav-enport was required to work the eventas well.“I worked one o the roulette ta- bles,” she said. “I was the ball girl. Thatwas a lot o un once I got the hango it. The frst time I threw it, it wentacross the table.”Students were each handed a smallstacks o ake money when they ar-rived to risk at the gambling tablesthroughout the night.“We also cashed out ake moneyand chips, lots and lots o chips,” shesaid.The money could be used to enteror chances to win prizes such as aniPad 2, a 32” television or a ree quar-ter o housing.John Terral, a sophomore businessadministration major, said his avoritepart about the Mardi Gras Masquer-ade was the oxygen bar.“I did the oxygen bar, and that wascool,” he said.
RANEY JOHNSON
Staff Reporter
The process to replace Tech XX, who died lastsummer, is still ongoing. Replacing a deceasedor retired mascot has continued since 1932 whenTech’s frst living mascot, Tech, died.The frst living mascot was given to the univer-sity by “Cotton” and “Sonny” Matthews, two stu-dents at Tech, during their reshman year, but theprocedure or getting a new bulldog has changedsince then.Jim King, vice president or student aairs,said the availability o getting a new bulldog isunknown right now because it depends on whena litter is ready at a specifc breeder. He said arepresentative rom the U.S. Department o Agri-culture recommended a breeder rom Louisiana.“There is an oversight committee on the cam-pus,” King said. “The selection o the animal will be on the characteristics defned.”King said the dierence betweenthe selection o Tech XXI and thepast bulldogs is in the ormal processo fnding a new bulldog.“This is not an unamiliar processor the university,” King said.King said the university alreadyhas to go through the process with thelivestock and other animals on Southcampus.Will Dearmon, president o theStudent Government Association,said the Bulldog Search Committee isstill in the process o replacing TechXX.“The search committee has made a great dealo progress since its establishment back in Sep-tember,” Dearmon said. “To date, we are waitingor national accreditation with varying boards andorganizations so Louisiana Tech will berecognized as a qualifed institution tohave a live mascot.”Dearmon said the search commit-tee is collaborating with other key par-ticipants such as the administration atthe Marbury Alumni Center and otheracademic organizations. He said thecollaboration would help urther defnethe roles and expectations o everyoneinvolved in fnding a live mascot.King said the SGA would also playan active role in fnding the new mas-cot. In addition, he said the goal is toget a puppy by spring quarter to betrained by the all.“You would possibly get a puppy eight weekso age in the spring,” King said. “That would giveus eight months.”King said the new mascot’s work would pri-marily be around events like ootball games andother sporting events to interact with students.However, King said the process o flling outthe proper paperwork must be fnished frst.“The USDA requires that an animal used orexhibitions be selected through their ofce,” hesaid.King said the USDA requires Tech to makesure there is a standard o care or the new bull-dog that includes veterinarian care and ormaloversight to manage the mascot.“The USDA is looking to see i those thingsare clearly thought through, which is a good
TECH XX
The student voice of Louisiana Tech University
TalkTech
February 7, 2013 www.thetechtalk.org 
T
he
Volume 87Number 15
PRSRT STDNON-PROFITORGANIZATIONUS POSTAGE
PAID
RUSTON, LAPERMIT NO 104RETURNSERVICEREQUESTED
PAGE
7
 
PAGE
3
>
see
BULLDOG
page 8
Photos by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay
>
see
CAFE
page 8
28 DAYS OF BLACK 
PAGE
10
BLUE CREW?
Find out what legendary former Tech-sters head coach Leon Barmore hasbeen up to since the end of his reign
>
see
MARDI
page 3
KAAMILYA SALAAM
Staff Reporter
It is a sunny mid-morning Mon-day. A student fnished with his 8 a.m.class is headed to the McCall DiningHall to meet up and chat with riendsonly to be turned around.Many students are unhappy withthe recent enorcement o the policythat students cannot enter the caete-ria unless they purchase something.Kendall Days, a senior psychologymajor, said he disagrees with the newrule imposing on his right to chatwith riends while they eat.“I think it’s ridiculous we shouldnot be allowed to hang out and talk to riends anywhere,” Days said.
Café cracksdown onstudents
ALICE ESSIEN
Staff Reporter
Around 10 a.m. Jan. 18,the Ruston Fire Departmentresponded to an emergencycall reporting that Tech’schapter o Alpha GammaRho’s raternity house wasenguled in ames.The ruinous blaze de-stroyed sections o the houseand caused displacement anddespair or members o theAGR and the occupants o the raternity house.No one was injured by thefre; the house was vacantwhen the ames erupted.None o the our AGR members who occupy thehouse were responsible orthe fre.The fre was caused by de-ective wiring said Eric Braz-zel, public education ofceror the City o Ruston FireDepartment“The fre was triggered byigniting electrical wiring thatoccurred when the protectiveplastic coating o the wireseroded, leaving the wires ex-posed,” Brazzel said. “This isvery common in older homes,like the AGR house, which iswhy landlords are encour-aged to constantly make surerental property is up to properhome inspection code.”The house was occupied by Wade Tracy, Joshua Ste-phens, Kaleb Herrington andAdam Foster.Tracy, a senior wildliehabitat management major,said he was stunned when heheard the news.“I got a call rom a riendwho saw the smoke,” Tracysaid. “I was in Laayette atthe time. I was shocked bythe news and curious to knowwhat type o damage had been done and what I hadlost.”The ames burned one bedroom badly and otherparts o the house sueredwater and severe smoke dam-age.Stephens, a junior equinescience major, said the frestarted in his room, whichwas burned the most severely.“I was at work when I gotthe call about the fre,” Ste-phens said. “I rushed to thehouse to see how bad it was.When I got there and realizedthat my room was completely burned up, it took a while orit to set in that I had lost ev-erything but the clothes onmy back.”Although the guys wholived in the house did not su-er any bodily injures, theyace issues o property lossand displacement.“I lost some TVs and alaptop and a lot o my be-longings,” Tracy said. “I man-aged to salvage most o thethings that were really im-portant to me. Since the fre,I’ve been sleeping on couch-es and having to crash withriends. My school work hassuered slightly as result o the constant moving around but nothing too bad.”As a result o the fre, AGR members and alumni haveoered a helping hand to re-store the house as well as thelives o the aected members.“Thanks to the great brothers I have in the rater-nity, it didn’t take long or meto get back to normal again,”Stephens said.
UP IN SMOKE
Search for Tech XXI continues
Tech fraternity house blazes,residents displaced
Top: Viewed rom the street, the AGR house appears to haveminimal visual damage.Let and bottom: Damage caused by the fre on the morning oJan. 18. Ofcials have confrmed that the fre was caused bydeective electrical wiring.
>
see
FIRE
page 3
 
ARE YOU A PART OF THE 
PAGE
9
Check out the movement thata small group of Tech studentsstarted to celebrate Black His-tory Month
Submitted Photo
Carlton Gray, let, and Gerard Babin, right, enjoy the oxygen bar at the MardiGras Masquerade hosted by Union Board and Residential Lie.
Students use fake cash, win real prizes
 
2
The Tech Talk
February 7, 2013
Campus
Physical therapisthosts 5k race
Danni Jones Physical Ther-apy will host the For the Loveo Running 5k race Feb. 16 at 9a.m. to benet Christian Com-munity Action, a local charity.The race is Valentine’s Daythemed, so participants are en-couraged to wear pink and red,but there is no required dresscode to participate.The registration ee is $25 orindividuals and $45 or couples.Those who register beoreFeb. 1 will receive a complimen-tary event T-shirt courtesy o Danni Jones Physical TherapyCenter.Runners may register byprinting o a copy o the waiverthat is located the Danni JonesPhysical Therapy Facebook page, stopping by Danni JonesPhysical Therapy Center’s rontdesk or online at www.danni-onespt.com.For more inormation onthe run or on how to donate tothe cause contact ChristopherSimpson at 318-251-2995 orchristopher_simpson39@yahoo.com
School to host abullying seminar
The School of Human Ecol-ogy and the Center for Childrenand Families of Monroe willhost “Love is Louder than Bul-lying” from 6-7:30 p.m., Tuesday,Feb. 19 at the Bridge CommunityChurch Auditorium in Ruston.
This is a Bruce Everist Lec-ture Series Event that includesan educational panel discussionon the topic o bullying.Psychologists, teachers andattorneys rom the area will dis-cuss bullying across the liespanand answer questions rom theaudience.Admission is ree and opento all ages.For more inormation con-tact 318-257-3727.
Percussion studio tohost winter concert
Tech Percussion Ensemblewill perorm their winter concertrom 7:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday,Feb. 16, in the Howard Audito-rium, Center or the PerormingArts.The concert will eature Vir-ginia-based percussionist DavidWol as a solo marimbist and aguest conductor.The Percussion Studio atTech oers comprehensivetraining designed to equip stu-dents or uture careers in music.Students can have the op-portunity to work one-on-onewith percussion aculty memberGregory Lyons to develop broadversatility as musicians.Tickets are ree with a stu-dent ID or $5 each.For more inormation con-tact Gregory Lyons, director o percussion studies, at 318-257-5470 or glyons@latech.edu.
Continuing Educationoffers dance classes
Tech’s Continuing Educa-tion is oering dance classesevery Monday and Wednesdaythrough Feb. 20. Times are de-pendent on the type o classcustomers enroll in.Those interested in enrollingcan pick rom several dierenttypes o dances including streetdancing, krump, house danceand some break dancing tech-niques.There are adult and youthclasses oered.Youth classes are Tuesdaysand Thursdays or ages 5-17.Registration is $50 per dancestyle session or adults and $45or youth sessions.For more inormation onclass times and styles, contactthe oce o Continuing Educa-tion at 318-257-4433.
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KAAMILYA SALAAM
Staff Reporter
High-top ades and retroshades, let’s step back into theold days.Walking across Tech’scampus may give one a caseo nostalgia, taking aculty back to their youth when thedays o gold chains and boom boxes mixed with dapper suitsand high-collar blouses werecommon.Kathleen Heiden, an as-sistant proessor o humanecology, said with technology being easily accessible, trendsare moving at a much asterrate than beore.There are more styles tochoose rom, causing a clashwith infuence coming romdierent decades.“There is a lot o infuencerom the ‘80s now,” Heidensaid. “We are seeing brightcolors, geometric patterns, ta-pered pants with oversize tops,peplums on dresses, unstruc-tured blazers, color blocking,asymmetrical designs andsweaters.”Heiden also said the ‘90sashion is being seen in shoetrends.“We are seeing some in-fuences o the ‘90s in shoes,with them becoming morepointed and stripes every-where,” Heiden said. “Mens-wear is also infuencing wo-menswear with the popularityo the blazer worn with every-thing—shorts, pants, skirts.”In addition, Heiden saidtoday’s ashion is more aboutindividual personality than setstyles.“There are styles that areashionable, but how some-one wears those styles is moreabout individual preerence,”Heiden said. “Students’ ap-pearances make a statemento comort while trendy. Stu-dents are wearing a lot o  bright colors and oversizedtops with tapered, tting pantsand fats.”Dressed in colored skinny jeans, an oversized sweatshirt,a snapback cap and Conversetennis shoes, Taqi Mustaaa,a junior sociology major, saidhe dresses in ‘80s ashion be-cause it tells the story o hislie.“I was raised by older par-ents who are my inspiration,so most o my style is takenrom their past,” Mustaaasaid. “I also wear a collectiono necklaces because theywere given to me by lovedones.”One o the necklaces Mus-taaa wears tells a bigger story,the story o a young man di-agnosed with diabetes.“I wear my diabetic neck-lace to alert those around methat I am a diabetic, in case o an emergency,” Mustaaa said.Unlike Mustaaa, GarlandRobinson, a junior mechanicalengineering major, takes one back into the days o swingdancing.Robinson said he takes hissense o ashion rom ‘40’sstyle menswear because heis in a raternity and they arerequired to dress business ca-sual once a week.“I dress nicer than my usu-al jeans and a T-shirt everyWednesday because I am anAlpha and it is our tradition,”Robinson said. “I just like topush the limit a little more.”Robinson oten dresses intailored slacks, a matchingvest and a cu linked dressshirt with a matching tie.From one era to the next,Lashare Jacobs, a rst yeartheater graduate student, saidshe likes to mix and match herstyle.Jacobs said she dresses theway she eels.“I love not matching, some-times I’ll mix vintage withtoday’s trend,” Jacobs said.“There are no rules.”As the seasons change andashion continues to evolve,students will continue to takea trip through a time machine.Heiden said as studentslook orward to spring, theywill continue to see the use o  bright colors as well as black,white and light neutrals.Heiden orecasts moresweaters and jackets to beworn with pants, short, andskirts or both spring and all.
Email comments to kms042@latech.edu.
Photos by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay
Students sport past fashions
Garland Robinson sports a‘40s business casual suit.Taqi Mustafaa (left), Garland Robinson (back) and Lashare Jacobs (right) dress in styles similar to past trends.
 
ALICE ESSIEN
Staff Reporter
Although February is theshortest month o the year, it isammed-packed with holidays,national events and variouscelebrations that are looked or-ward to by many.The Super Bowl, GroundhogDay, Presidents’ Day, Valen-tine’s and the beloved Louisian-ian Mardi Gras all all under therealm o February.In addition to these, Febru-ary is also national Black His-tory Month, but with all thecommotion, o more prominentestivities its celebration can gounnoticed.A group o Tech studentshas set out to bring recognitionto the month’s historic valuethrough ashion.Sha’nesha Richardson,Breanna Jones and KywonnaDrake are initiating 28 Days o Black, a social movement tohonor Black History Month.Drake, a senior English ma-or, came up with the idea o the celebration.“I didn’t want to do anythingthat took a lot o eort or plan-ning that would deter me rommy other obligations,” Drakesaid. “That’s when I came upwith the idea just to wear black every day o February. ThenBreanna suggested making itinto a mini movement by pro-moting it on social networkswhile sitting around chattingwith riends.”Richardson, a junior psy-chology major, came up withthe name to token the celebra-tion.“We wanted somethingcatchy that people could eas-ily hashtag on social networks”Richardson said. “28 Days o Black was simple enough sowe just ran with the idea romthere.”The three girls began toood social networks like Face- book, Instagram and Twitterwith pictures and artwork pro-moting their movement.Their eort began to gainattention and they began to getcomments and messages romother students interested in joining the movement.“It didn’t take long or otherpeople to take interest.” Drakesaid. “I think people were soeager to participate becausewhen you are a black student atpredominately white institution,there is a very limited amounto occasions that recognize, letalone celebrate, black heritage.The simplicity o the move-ment draws in participants andits attributes keep them in-trigued, Drake said.Kennedy Jones, a junior bi-ology major, plans on partici-pating in the 28 Days o Black movement.“When I saw the post onFacebook, it sparked my inter-est,” he said. “Usually Black History Month comes and goesand nobody bats an eye aroundhere. In grade school, we cel-ebrated by learning about posi-tive black fgures who let theirmarks on history. 28 Days o Black puts an interesting twiston the celebration and letsus express our own tribute toBlack History Month.”Jones, a senior account-ing major whose idea it was tomake the movement viral, saidthe movement is more than aashion statement.“28 Days o Black is morethan just wearing black clothes,”Jones said. “It’s about payinghomage and tribute to blackswho paved the way, endured thestruggle and made the sacrifc-es so that other blacks could bewhere we are today. By wearingthe black, we are simply sayingthat we haven’t orgotten whatthey’ve done and we appreciatetheir eorts.”All anyone has to do is wear black during February to jointhe movement.“The movement is verysimple,” Drake said. “You don’thave to wear all black everyday. As long as your predomi-nant outft colors are black an you use the 28 Days o Black hashtag, you’re down with thecause.”
Email comments to eae008@latech.edu.
February 7, 2013
The Tech Talk
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Students celebrate 28 Days of Black 
KAAMILYA SALAAM
Staff Reporter
Computers are humming and print-ers are singing as students await theirprintouts; once received they discardthe top sheet into a blue bin. This bin isthe uture o the university.It is the proo o an eort to be-come greener by recycling.Kendall Belcher, National Societyo Black Engineers Recycling Com-mittee chairman, said many eorts arebeing made by dierent organizationsthroughout campus.“The recycling eorts we have pro-vide a range, rom recycling bins in thelibrary and Bogard Hall,” Belcher said.“We also do a drive once a month tocollect anything people can bring andwe take care o recycling it or them,and the collecting o cans rom ootballgames.”Belcher also said NSBE is currentlyworking on uture projects to place bins in the quad and the student center.NSBE joined with the Society o Women Engineers in 2011 to urthertheir recycling eorts.Brittany Copponex, president o SWE, said the organization has previ-ously provided our recycling bins inBogard, and they host recycling driveseach month.“We have recycling drives everyThursday and Friday beore the sec-ond Saturday o each month so we cantake the products to the local acilities,”Copponex said.Copponex said the organizationholds the events not only to promoterecycling but also to promote the useo resources among engineers.“As engineers, the biggest thingabout recycling is the eective useo your resources,” Copponex said.“Through recycling we‘re able to con-serve our resources and reuse them.That’s the tagline that goes along withengineering.”Copponex said SWE is currentlyworking with NSBE on a uture projectto have a design plan or a giant bin to be placed on South Campus.“The bin would be used to hold allthe things that are currently being re-cycled,” Copponex said. “It will help toincrease the amount o drives the orga-nizations can have a month.”In addition to NSBE and SWE, theUnited States Green Building Councilstudents are also creating new ways torecycle on campus.USGBC is an organization o stu-dents rom the School o Architecturewho comes up with new ways to imple-ment recycling throughout campus.Kevin Singh, an assistant proessoro architecture and director or USG-BC, said students have come up witha design or a bin that they hope willexpand into other buildings all overcampus.“The design created during the De-cember charrette is ready to be fnal-ized and we should start building it inthe spring,” Singh said.The bin will be placed in Hale Hallor students to recycle cardboard.Singh also said he would like to notonly see the bin expand throughoutcampus but through the community.“I would like to see us partner withthe city and other organizations topotentially lead to curbside recyclingor a acility,” Singh said. “The currentarrangement or the city is two trashpickup days a week. I we can committo the recycling eorts, it could be trashone day and recyclables the other day.”Several students said they wouldtoo like to see more o an attempt torecycle around campus.Adam Alred, a sophomore second-ary education major, said he would liketo see more bins in dorms and near thered tables.He also said i a plan was imple-mented to pay or recycling such asa $20 addition to tuition, it would beworth it in the long-run..“I want more done; thereore i tu-ition has to rise by $20, I wouldn’t mindpaying it,” Alred said.Similar to Alred, Chase Rowan, asophomore mechanical engineeringmajor, said he would support the e-orts or Tech to be more eco-riendly.“I’ve noticed there aren’t enough bins or trash cans on campus, betweenMitchell and the Student Center, there’sonly one trashc an by Woodard,” Row-an said. “That creates the temptationor a person to litter.”As the economy and society be-come more ocus on being greener, sois the student body o Tech’s campus.Alred said recycling is the uture.
Email comments to kms042@latech.edu.
Campus groups advocate recycling
>
MARDI
from pg. 1
According to Jean Pierre DuRousseau, or-mer president o the AGR, Tech Greek lie hasaided tremendously during this tough time.“Dealing with an incident like this can be di-fcult or anyone,” DuRousseau said. “We areortunate to have the support o other Greek organizations like PIKE and Phi Mu lending usa helping hand.”DuRousseau said AGR plans on rebuildingand restoring the house and this unortunatemishap will not damper their spirits.“We rent the house, so we’ve been talkingto the owners and they’ve assured us that theyplan on repairing the damages by renovating thehouse,” DuRousseau said.
Email comments to eae008@latech.edu.
>
FIRE
from pg. 1
Photos by Alice Essien
From left to right: Kywonna Drake, Breanna Jones and Sha’nesha Richardson sporting black attire inhonor of Black History Month.
The oxygen bar is a requentsight at many casinos and ftin with the array o gamblingtables set up in the Tonk.Terral said he went becausea riend asked him to, and hewas glad he did.“It was a un way to hang outwith my riends,” he said. “Thetheme was cool, too.”Camille Pearce, a senior in-terior design major, said shethought it was a great hit.“It was good switching to aMardi Gras rom the Rolling inVegas theme,” Pearce said. “Ilike Mardi Gras a lot, so it madeit more appealing I think.”She said she believes thedecorations were wonderuland really made the event, not-ing it reminded her o being ata Mardi Gras ball.Though Pearce played blackjack and danced, she saidthe event was not all un andgames or her, she was alsoworking on behal o TechTV.“I was there flming the eventlike we do every year,” Pearcesaid. “We’ll do a highlight o itto later put on the channel.”Justin McLain, a junior ki-nesiology major, said he wasat the event because he worksor residential lie as ResidentAdvisor“We decorated everything,”he said. “We started makingdecorations at the beginningo the quarter. We all met uptwo to three times a week oraround two hours each time. Itwas a lot o hard work.”The day o the event UnionBoard was able to bring in thetables, and the DJ came in andset up, McLain said.“We had to take hour shits,”he said. “My thing was enter-tainment, so I got to entertainpeople with hypnosis and mag-ic, which I really enjoyed.”McLain said the work wasall worth it, even though it wastime consuming, especially inthe days near the event.“It was a very, very un expe-rience,” he said. “I can’t wait to be a part o it again next year.”
Email comments to acv001@latech.edu.

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