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February 7th 2013

February 7th 2013

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Published by The Ontarion
The Ontarion February 7th 2013, issue 107.5
The Ontarion February 7th 2013, issue 107.5

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Published by: The Ontarion on Feb 07, 2013
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70.5
thursday, ebruary 7th, 0
www.theontarion.com
T U  Gl’ I S N
...see
organic 
page 7
 
contents
A & ClS & HlLElCC LCl
8162125262727
features
4
 
BoDY 
IMAGE
8
 
K’naan
RETURNS
2
 
Is PMs
FAKE?
Glph g gi
32nd annual OrganicConerence and Expo
amy van den berg
Walking into the University Cen-
  F. 2-3,  l
have been overwhelmed by theintense and renzied bustle o 
Guelph’s 32nd Annual Guelph Or-ganic Conerence. Everywhere onthe main and basement foor, peo-
ple o all ages and backgrounds
were walking rom one booth to
the next, tasting, chatting, and
learning about what it means to
“ .”
Entry to the Expo was ree o charge and all were welcome toexplore the three levels o 150+
  x 
rom carrot juice samples to in-teractive displays o innovativearming equipment. Workshops
 ll   
ee or people who were interestedin attending specic lectures, and
  J. 31 l F. 3.
The Organic Conerence andExpo allowed consumers andproducers to come together tonetwork, as well as to shareknowledge, ideas, and delicioussamples. It was designed to in-crease awareness and to oer
l      k
the taste o organic ood. e ex-
  k  k   “l ” -  ,     l
geared towards brand-new users,
 l k q,  -
cover how and why purchasingorganic goods, and making the
local choice, can benet them and
 .“I’  l    l
rom each other…where like-minded people come together,”said Carrin McGowan, a rep-resentative o CRAFT Ontario(Collaborative Regional Allianceor Farmer Training in Ontario),
a company that oers ecological
 .
And there was no better place
       
University o Guelph. With a his-
 l   l
and livestock management, theuniversity is home to numerous
students and scholars rom diverse
-k,  k 
interact with consumers and major
   .“I     - -   ,” Dk Bl,  U
o Guelph student studying Or-
ganic Agriculture, “I never realizedhow interested many people are innding out exactly how their ood
 ,       .” ll “”  
the ood or product was created
and cultivated in a way that en-
hances and promotes biodiversity,
uses environmentally sustain-able practices, and protects the
health o the soil and surroundingecosystem. Certied organic prod-ucts assure the consumer that theway in which the ood is grown or
T coc w ma ol s  g o mo abo ogacall gow aoc oo.
 
Wendy Shepherd
 
news
3
70.5
 
 
ebruary 7th, 0
Glbl  Ll:
 
U o G students andaculty on internationaland national news
Feb. 4 marked the beginning o the end or Canadians’ least a-vourite coin, the penny. It lled
wallets and pockets with the pre-
tense o being something more,
like a nickel, and never got usedunless there was a donation-on-ly bake sale, and now, or at least
  x    ,
Canadians will eel a little better
about throwing the penny out,
 ’ l 
doing or years. e Royal Mint o-
cially stopped distributing the
coin on Feb. 4, and businesses will
     
nearest ve cents, while debit and
  ll ll 
or the one-cent increment. With
the orecasted disappearance o the penny comes an upsurge in
l   k    . I , 
 jewelry business owner told
CTV News
that since the planned de-
   ,  l   .
Te Ontarion:
Have you heard
   ,    ?
rilly ll, a Hiy -
dent:
Yes, it does. I work in thecustomer service industry, so Ithink it’s interesting that we’re
going to have to round [prices] up
 .
Te Ot:
H    -
pact do you think it will have on
 l?
rf
: Not too big, but it is kind o sadthat [the penny] is leaving becauseit’s a part o Canadian history, and
working in the customer service
, ’     ll ,     
down. But, I don’t think it’s too
big o [a deal] just because it is only
 .
Te Ontarion:
What do you think
 l       ?
r
: I k ’ ll -
ing, especially or kids that won’t
k  [ ]. I k’      l
or a lot too just because it isn’t
really worth anything right now,but in the uture, it will probably
be sold or a lot more, which is
ll l.
Tanks to the participant for this
week’s interview. If you havesomething to say about inter-national or national news, and would like to be contacted for  future issues, or if you want to
see a particular news story cov-
ered here, contact News Editor 
Alicja Grzadkowska at onnews@uoguelph.ca.
Bidgig h gp b y  kig
Te 19
th
annualEnvironmentalSymposium a greatsuccess
emma wison
On Feb. 2, the University o Guelph held its 1th annual En-
vironmental Sciences Symposium
in Rozanski Hall. e theme this
year was, “Traditional Knowledge
and Cultural Perspectives on the
Environment.” e symposium
ocused on moving environmen-
tal issues orward by bridgingthe gaps, and otentimes abyss-
,  l  
knowledge, and traditional and
“” k.
Speakers included Karen Kow-alchuk, Laura Taylor and Jeremy
Shute, Dr. Deborah McGregor,
J C, D. S C,
Anthony Chegahno, Sandra Mc-
C, D. L Gl, D. BS,  H Lk.
“ere is a desperate need or theworld to take action on greenhouse
gasses,” noted Smit. Smit’s talk
explored the many serious rami-
cations o warming temperaturessuch as rising sea levels and stormsthreatening island states, drought
    l
degradation in Kenya, and in other
.
Solutions to environmentalconcerns may be ound in en-
couraging interdisciplinary study.
“Lots o people are looking at
 ,    l -
cle,” said Smit. e “bits” regardindividual disciplines and special-
izations, and the “bicycle” is an
ideal network o these specializa-tions that allows or a fourishing
  l l.
Lickers, a member o the Seneca
Nation, Turtle Clan, presented a
lk      
science and traditional aboriginalknowledge. He noted, “At a basic
ll, l kl    .”
“Traditional” is sometimesassociated with the inapplica-ble conventions o ages passed.
H, Lk  
traditional knowledge is always
changing and the learning pro-
cess can be very similar to science.
For instance, Lickers noted thatthe process o hunting is largely
xl. H l 
that the anecdotal stories through
which traditional knowledge is
  ll  -
ent than the stories in scientic
 jl.
Despite the similarities, there
are serious barriers to urther
 l  W-
ern or “modern” knowledge.Disseminators o both orms o 
knowledge sometimes view the
   l .
For example, Lickers suggestedthat Aboriginal Peoples have seenWestern knowledge as “a process
that is arrogant and ignores orridicules the knowledge o the
local people. Western Culture is
 []    D
Society [separating] itsel rom
the Environment and Humanity
     ,”xl Lk.
“Even though we have known
    ,  
still mis-knowing each other,”
 Lk.
ose students, aculty mem-
bers, and Guelph residents who
attended the symposium were let
with a strong message: embrac-
ing the merits o dierent ways o 
knowing the natural world will
l     -
nated and thoughtul solutionsto the environmental problems
 .
“A key element is respectingwhat others do. Each piece o knowledge has its value,” con-
l Lk.
exc mmbs o  smosm (l o g): e Malo, Gè Lalo, Coll pak(dco), Alx has a Laa Blazjwsk.
Wendy Shepherd
“Even thoughwe have knowneach other or500 years, weare still mis-knowing eachother.”
- Henry Lickers

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