Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Lumina Foundation Strategic Plan 2013-2016

Lumina Foundation Strategic Plan 2013-2016

Ratings: (0)|Views: 32 |Likes:
Published by XefNed
As the nation’s largest private foundation focused exclusively on getting more Americans into and through higher education, Lumina has a unique leadership opportunity—and responsibility—to act strategically to produce outcomes that will ultimately lead to much higher levels of higher education attainment. This report outlines Lumina's high level imperatives and strategies to direct the Foundation's efforts from 2013 to 2016.
As the nation’s largest private foundation focused exclusively on getting more Americans into and through higher education, Lumina has a unique leadership opportunity—and responsibility—to act strategically to produce outcomes that will ultimately lead to much higher levels of higher education attainment. This report outlines Lumina's high level imperatives and strategies to direct the Foundation's efforts from 2013 to 2016.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: XefNed on Feb 08, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/08/2013

pdf

text

original

 
STRATEGIC PLAN
2013 TO 2016
February 3, 2013
 
In 2009, Lumina Foundation released its rst strategicplan, based on the goal that 60% o Americans obtain ahigh-quality postsecondary degree or credential by 2025—a goal we now call Goal 2025. Much has changed evenin the short time since that plan was written, both in theexternal environment and in what we have learned romour work. This strategic plan—intended to guide our workor the next our years rom 2013 through 2016—refectsthose changes:
Throughout the nation, there is a much broader and deeper understanding of the need to increase
postsecondary attainment. Some version o Goal 2025 has been adopted by or is a major infuenceon the ederal government, a majority o states, national higher education associations, manyindividual colleges and universities, and communities around the U.S. including several largemetropolitan regions. At the same time, however, the resources available to support new initiativesto increase attainment in traditional ways are severely constrained.
We have learned much about the challenges in increasing attainment, as well as promisingapproaches for doing so. We know the factors that inuence student success in postsecondaryeducation and how more students could receive the support they need to succeed. We have
learned how to help higher education institutions and systems become more productive to serve
more students. We have learned the necessity of assuring the quality of degrees and other credentialsin terms of student learning and how this might be done. We have also learned a great deal about
infuencing public policy at the state and ederal levels and mobilizing higher education institutions,communities, and regions to increase attainment.Between 2009 and 2025 lie 16 years. Our rst strategic plan covered the rst quarter—the rst
four years—and this strategic plan will take us halfway to 2025. We have set the stage for reaching
the goal, but we believe over the next our years we must do two things: develop a clear understandingo what we must do to create a system o higher education that can reach much higher levels oattainment, and make real progress toward the 60% goal.
Progress on Increasing Attainment
In 2009, setting a national goal or higher education attainment was a bold step, even or anational oundation ocused on college access and success. In act, we called it “The Big Goal” and
described it as “audacious but attainable” in that rst strategic plan. While we now call it Goal 2025,
it remains our ocus. To Lumina, the goal has always been more than a vision statement—we believeit must be attained, and we believe it can be attained.Reaching Goal 2025 is a national imperative and will require concerted action on the part o many.
While Lumina cannot reach the goal through our actions alone, we hold ourselves accountable for
acting strategically to produce the conditions that will lead to much higher levels o attainment andto help mobilize the individuals, organizations, institutions, and governments throughout the U.S.that must act to reach the goal.Shortly ater the release o our rst strategic plan, we began reporting on national progress towardthe goal in a series o reports called
 A Stronger Nation through Higher Education
. In these reports, we set
1Lumina Foundation Strategic Plan 2013 to 2016
GOAL 2025
To increase the proportion o Americans with high-quality degrees, certifcates, andother credentials to 60%by the year 2025
 
2Lumina Foundation Strategic Plan 2013 to 2016
the metric or measuring progress as the percentage o the U.S. adult, working-age population holdinga two- or our-year college degree.In 2011, the most recent year or which data are available, the percentage o Americans betweenthe ages o 25 and 64 with a two- or our-year college degree was 38.7%. The rate has been increasingslowly but steadily – rom 37.9% in 2008, to 38.1% in 2009, to 38.3% in 2010.In 2011, the higher education attainment rate o young adults (ages 25-34), a good leading in-dicator o where higher education attainment rates are headed, was 40.1%—almost one-and-a-halpercentage points higher than or all adults and two-and-a-hal percentage points higher than in 2008.From the rst strategic plan, Lumina’s attainment goal has included high-value postsecondarycerticates.
i
Data on the number o adults holding certicates are not readily available, so it has beenimpossible to include certicate holders in our reporting on higher education attainment rates. Thisyear, however, the rst solid estimates o the number o high-value postsecondary certicates havebeen produced. They suggest that an additional 5% o the U.S. adult population between the ages o25 and 64 hold a postsecondary certicate with signicant economic value.
ii
 The recent increase in attainment rates is a step in the right direction, but we must accelerateprogress i we hope to reach a national attainment rate o 60%. That task is the ocus o this strategicplan and Lumina’s work. The goal has not changed, but our understanding o the conditions that aredriving the need or increased attainment—both economic and social—is much deeper than it waswhen the goal was rst proposed. Likewise, the need to increase attainment is clearer than ever.
The Economic Need to Increase Attainment
In our rst strategic plan, the rationale or increasing higher education attainment was just becoming
more widely understood. While it is perhaps inevitable that there has also been a certain push-back
to the goal and to the idea o increasing higher education attainment generally (more on that later),most now agree that, as a nation, we desperately need more citizens with postsecondary credentials.
We now know that 65% of U.S. jobs—almost two-thirds—will require some form of postsecondary
education by 2020.
iii
For individual Americans, the consequences o not completing postsecondary education areincreasingly dire. For many years, the main reason many people went to college was to gain accessto better-paying jobs that allowed them to earn more throughout their lives. But earnings potential isno longer the only driver. In this economy, the issue is whether you even
have
a job.The Great Recession made this relationship painully clear. Between the beginning o the recessionin December 2007 and its ocial end in January 2010, the economy lost 5.6 million jobs or Americanswith a high school education or less. Jobs requiring an associate degree or some college declined by1.75 million, while the number o jobs or Americans with a bachelor’s degree or above actually grew by187,000. That’s right—the growth in jobs or bachelor’s degree holders slowed during the recession butnever actually declined, and the economy continued to create jobs or them throughout the recession.Since the end o the recession, jobs requiring an associate degree or some college have grownby 1.6 million and almost recovered to pre-recession levels. Jobs or bachelor’s degree holders haveaccelerated their growth—adding 2 million new jobs in the recovery. In contrast, the recovery never

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->