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The Resurrection of Theism: Prolegomena to Christian Apology by Stuart C Hackett

The Resurrection of Theism: Prolegomena to Christian Apology by Stuart C Hackett

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Published by Adam
This is the 2nd Edition of an epochal treatise in rationalistic theism. The 1st Edition is extremely rare, having been printed in hardbound by Moody Press in 1957 in a printing of only 2,000. Unfortunately, the plates were destroyed.

The bottom line of this book is to show how to self-referentially analyze statements to eliminate the possibility of opposing views, and to prove the impossibility of an actually infinite temporal sequence or an actually infinite set of discrete extra-mental objects.

Hence, believing that God exists is the end of a long metatheoretic journey, an intellectual cul-de-sac from which there is no logical escape, only a chosen one.

Analyzing statements that refer to themselves dominates the entire work, even in relation to self-referential analysis itself and the prior structures of conceptionalization.

But the refutation of an infinite series, which is decisive for his cosmological argument, is extremely brief and cursory, so you'll have to check out other sources for a development of that refutation (Hint: using a principle of construction with no assigned limit does not imply an actual or actualizable infinite series.)

The whole point for the common person exposed to general universal statements about knowledge, truth, or reality---"Everything is X (determined, person-relative, illusion, maya, false, subjective, biased, hopeless, meaningless, futile, BS, etc.), is to ask: What about that statement ITSELF?

With relativism, for example, how can relativism mean the same thing to any mind from one moment to the next, as well as from one person to another?

Once you ask that question, you realize that those statements are always stated as if *they* get a free ride.

The next time you hear someone throwing around universals, try asking that question. The lights will go on, and you'll get to where you can recognize self-referring statements rather quickly.

Most of the time, you'll find that this boils down to someone not wanting anyone to do any thinking, while criticizing other views without any self-questioning or examination of background assumptions. Sound familiar?

"You're so bigoted and I'm so objective about subjectivity." Got it?

And of course you'll hear no real mention of this convenient little self-exemption.

Fortunately, very common non-intellectual people are becoming street-wise about these kinds of remarks, simply by learning to ask that one simple question.

What about that statement itself?

Drives the loud champions of intellectual humility absolutely crazy.

Unfortunately, there is still no single work that contains virtually every argument and counterargument that has ever been put forth concerning the existence of God. You'll find very little in print concerning metaphilosophical mind-commandments, mind-principle relations and obligation, value assumptions of reason, performative inconsistency, self-referential analysis, starting points and the burden of proof, and whether the nature of a deistic or theistic God implies any obligation to save the world.

For further investigation, see anything by William Craig, Norman Geisler (The Terminator of christian apologetics, in print but especially his many debates), or Germain Grisez; Joseph Boyle's 1975 dissertation, "Self-Referential Analysis: The Current Discussion"; Against Relativism by James Harris (possibly the finest refutation of relativism of all time); "Atheological Apologetics" (one of the most difficult but clever articles ever written against atheism) by Scott Shalkowski (American Philosophical Quarterly 26 {1989}, pp. 1-17).

I strongly recommend, for analytic background: The Nature of Thought (2 vols) by Brand Blandshard, Language and Reality by Wilbur Marshal Urban, Critique of Pure Reason, Monadology by Leibniz, anything by Alvin Plantinga, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer.
This is the 2nd Edition of an epochal treatise in rationalistic theism. The 1st Edition is extremely rare, having been printed in hardbound by Moody Press in 1957 in a printing of only 2,000. Unfortunately, the plates were destroyed.

The bottom line of this book is to show how to self-referentially analyze statements to eliminate the possibility of opposing views, and to prove the impossibility of an actually infinite temporal sequence or an actually infinite set of discrete extra-mental objects.

Hence, believing that God exists is the end of a long metatheoretic journey, an intellectual cul-de-sac from which there is no logical escape, only a chosen one.

Analyzing statements that refer to themselves dominates the entire work, even in relation to self-referential analysis itself and the prior structures of conceptionalization.

But the refutation of an infinite series, which is decisive for his cosmological argument, is extremely brief and cursory, so you'll have to check out other sources for a development of that refutation (Hint: using a principle of construction with no assigned limit does not imply an actual or actualizable infinite series.)

The whole point for the common person exposed to general universal statements about knowledge, truth, or reality---"Everything is X (determined, person-relative, illusion, maya, false, subjective, biased, hopeless, meaningless, futile, BS, etc.), is to ask: What about that statement ITSELF?

With relativism, for example, how can relativism mean the same thing to any mind from one moment to the next, as well as from one person to another?

Once you ask that question, you realize that those statements are always stated as if *they* get a free ride.

The next time you hear someone throwing around universals, try asking that question. The lights will go on, and you'll get to where you can recognize self-referring statements rather quickly.

Most of the time, you'll find that this boils down to someone not wanting anyone to do any thinking, while criticizing other views without any self-questioning or examination of background assumptions. Sound familiar?

"You're so bigoted and I'm so objective about subjectivity." Got it?

And of course you'll hear no real mention of this convenient little self-exemption.

Fortunately, very common non-intellectual people are becoming street-wise about these kinds of remarks, simply by learning to ask that one simple question.

What about that statement itself?

Drives the loud champions of intellectual humility absolutely crazy.

Unfortunately, there is still no single work that contains virtually every argument and counterargument that has ever been put forth concerning the existence of God. You'll find very little in print concerning metaphilosophical mind-commandments, mind-principle relations and obligation, value assumptions of reason, performative inconsistency, self-referential analysis, starting points and the burden of proof, and whether the nature of a deistic or theistic God implies any obligation to save the world.

For further investigation, see anything by William Craig, Norman Geisler (The Terminator of christian apologetics, in print but especially his many debates), or Germain Grisez; Joseph Boyle's 1975 dissertation, "Self-Referential Analysis: The Current Discussion"; Against Relativism by James Harris (possibly the finest refutation of relativism of all time); "Atheological Apologetics" (one of the most difficult but clever articles ever written against atheism) by Scott Shalkowski (American Philosophical Quarterly 26 {1989}, pp. 1-17).

I strongly recommend, for analytic background: The Nature of Thought (2 vols) by Brand Blandshard, Language and Reality by Wilbur Marshal Urban, Critique of Pure Reason, Monadology by Leibniz, anything by Alvin Plantinga, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer.

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Published by: Adam on Feb 09, 2013
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02/09/2013

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 The Resurrection of Theism
 
 
The Resurrection of Theism
________________________________
Prolegomena to ChristianApology
________________________________
 
 By
STUART CORNELIUS HACKETT, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy, Louisiana CollegePineville, Louisiana
 
R
OGER
W
ASSON
C
OMPANY
 
AUSTIN, TEXAS
 
 
Copyright
?
2003Roger Wasson Company825 West 11
th
Street Suite 139Austin Texas 78701-2009

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