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Table Of Contents

Introduction
Early Art Historical Studies and Burma – A Particular Time and Place
Gordon Luce – The 'Founding' Historian of Bagan, and his Lasting
History, Art History and Southeast Asia
The Burden of "Indianisation"
Historiography and Burma – new approaches
A Note on Taxonomy and Burmese Buddhist Art
Summary
Chapter 1 Histories and Narratives – the Origins of Bagan and its Art
The Glass Palace Chronicle – a Key Factor
Histories of Bagan
The Founding of Bagan
The Nanchao Invasions and the Pyu
The Mon Paradigm
A Chronology of Bagan's Temples
Remarks on Theravada and Mahayana "Art"
Narrative and Buddhism
Narratives of the Buddha's Last Earthly Existence
Conclusion
The Pyu
A Wide Sphere of Influence
Spiritual Beliefs and the Pyu – a Multifaceted Buddhism
Pyu Artistic Styles
The Fall of the Pyu and Rise of the Burmans
Remnants of Pyu Culture at Bagan
Pyu Votive Tablets
Religion at Bagan Prior to Anawrahta
Brahmanism – Another Link to the Pyu?
The Pyu – Burman Link : New Findings
Paw-daw-mu (no.996)
Conclusions
Anawrahta’s Votive Tablets
Anawrahta’s Temples
Mon Influence
East Hpet-leik (no.1030) and West Hpet-leik (no.1031)
Shwe-zigon (no.1)
Shwe-hsan-daw (no.1568)
Shin-bin-thalyaung (no.1570)
Ma-nu-ha-hpaya (no.1240)
Nan-hpaya (no.1239)
Paung-ku-hpaya (no.1339)
Mon-gu (no.2013)
Kyauk-ku-umin (no.154)
Gu-bi-za-gyi (no.1662)
Pa-tha-da-gu (no.1476)
Myin-pya-gu (no.1493)
Other Anawrahta-Period Images
Chapter 4 Kyanzittha, Unifier of Burma
Kyanzittha’s Temples
Naga-yon-hpaya (no.1192)
Abe-ya-dana-hpaya (no.1202)
Ananda-gu-hpaya-gyi (no.2171)
Kubyauk-nge Wetkyi-in (no.285)
Kubyauk-gyi Myinkaba (no.1323)
A Review of Selected Imagery and Narrative Scenes of the Early Bagan
Shwe-hsan-daw
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Burmese Buddhist Imagery of the EarlyBagan Period (1044 – 1113)

Burmese Buddhist Imagery of the EarlyBagan Period (1044 – 1113)

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Published by lambda8

http://hdl.handle.net/1885/41898

Buddhism is an integral part of Burmese culture. While Buddhism has been practiced in Burma for around 1500 years and evidence of the religion is found throughout the country, nothing surpasses the concentration of Buddhist monuments found at Bagan. Bagan represents not only the beginnings of a unified Burmese country, but also symbolises Burmese 'ownership' of Theravada Buddhism. ¶ While there is an abundance of artistic material throughout Burma, the study of Burmese Buddhist art by western scholars remains in it infancy due to historical events. Recently, opportunities for further research have increased, and Bagan, as the region of Buddhism's principal flowering in Burma, is the starting point for the study of Burmese Buddhist art. To date, there has been no systematic review of the stylistic or iconographic characteristics of the Buddhist images of this period. This thesis proposes, for the first time, a chronological framework for sculptural depictions of the Buddha, and identifies the characteristics of Buddha images for each identified phase. The framework and features identified should provide a valuable resource for the dating of future discoveries of Buddhist sculpture at Bagan.

(digitalcollections.anu.edu.au)

http://hdl.handle.net/1885/41898

Buddhism is an integral part of Burmese culture. While Buddhism has been practiced in Burma for around 1500 years and evidence of the religion is found throughout the country, nothing surpasses the concentration of Buddhist monuments found at Bagan. Bagan represents not only the beginnings of a unified Burmese country, but also symbolises Burmese 'ownership' of Theravada Buddhism. ¶ While there is an abundance of artistic material throughout Burma, the study of Burmese Buddhist art by western scholars remains in it infancy due to historical events. Recently, opportunities for further research have increased, and Bagan, as the region of Buddhism's principal flowering in Burma, is the starting point for the study of Burmese Buddhist art. To date, there has been no systematic review of the stylistic or iconographic characteristics of the Buddhist images of this period. This thesis proposes, for the first time, a chronological framework for sculptural depictions of the Buddha, and identifies the characteristics of Buddha images for each identified phase. The framework and features identified should provide a valuable resource for the dating of future discoveries of Buddhist sculpture at Bagan.

(digitalcollections.anu.edu.au)

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Published by: lambda8 on Feb 10, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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