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4.06 Geol + Soils (1-31)

4.06 Geol + Soils (1-31)

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Published by David Danelski
Geology chapter in World Logistics Center Draft EIR
Geology chapter in World Logistics Center Draft EIR

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Published by: David Danelski on Feb 11, 2013
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World Logistics Center Project
Draft Environmental Impact Report
Section 4.6 Geology and Soils 4.6-1
 
4.6 GEOLOGY AND SOILS
1
This section describes the location of the proposed project relative to the known geologic features
2
and soil conditions and qualitatively evaluates potential impacts. Additionally, this chapter evaluates
3
whether development on the proposed project site would significantly be affected by fault rupture,
4
seismic shaking, erosion or unstable slopes, liquefaction, settlement, expansive soils, or other soil or
5
geologic conditions.
67
For the reader’s reference, this EIR and each of the technical reports and analyses contained herein
8
have been written to address a series of planning entitlements, which affect several separate,
9
adjacent and related properties. The overall project site covers 3,918 acres in the Rancho Belago
10
area of the City of Moreno Valley. It includes 3,814 acres of land, which is the subject of various
11
entitlements, plus 104 acres of land affected by off-site improvements needed to support the
12
proposed development. The proposed entitlements are summarized below.
1314
A General Plan Amendment is proposed covering 3,814 acres, which redesignates approximately 71
15
percent of the area (2,710 acres) for logistics warehousing and the remaining 29 percent (1,104
16
acres) for permanent open space and public facilities. The following elements of the General Plan are
17
included in the proposed Amendment: Community Development (land use); Circulation; Parks,
18
Recreation, and Open Space; Safety; Conservation; and the General Plan Goals and Objectives.
1920
A new Specific Plan will be adopted to govern development of the World Logistics Center for the
21
2,710 acres. A separate zoning amendment will also be processed and adopted to rezone 1,104
22
acres for open space and public facilities uses and to incorporate the Specific Plan into the City’s
23
Zoning Map.
2425
In addition to the General Plan Amendment, Specific Plan, and Zone Change, the project includes a
26
Tentative Parcel Map covering 1,539 acres (property owned by the project applicant, Highland
27
Fairview) within the project site. This subdivision map is for financing purposes only and will not
28
confer any development rights to the property owner.
2930
The project includes pre-annexation zoning for an 85-acre parcel of land within the project area.
3132
Finally, a Development Agreement between the City and Highland Fairview (the project applicant) is
33
included as one of the project entitlements. The details of all the project entitlements are included in
34
Section 3.4 of the EIR,
Project Characteristics 
. The environmental impacts of all of these entitlements
35
on the entire project area are addressed in this EIR and the accompanying technical reports and
36
analyses.
3738
The following documents were prepared to analyze the geologic impacts of the proposed WLC
39
project:
4041
 
Preliminary Geotechnical Evaluation for Environmental Impact Report the World Logistics Center 
42
Specific Plan South of Highway 60 Between Redlands Boulevard and Gilman Springs Road City 
43
of Moreno Valley, California.
Leighton and Associates, Inc. January 23, 2013. (Appendix G).
44
 
Response to NOP Comments for the World Logistics Center Specific Plan.
Leighton and
45
Associates, Inc. May 2012 (Appendix G).
46
 
“Preliminary Geotechnical Report, Tentative Parcel Map 35629, Moreno Valley, California, Project 
47
No. 111061-108,” by Leighton and Associates, Inc. June 15, 2007.
48
 
“Update Preliminary Geotechnical Report, Tentative Parcel Map 35629, Highland Fairview 
49
Corporate Park, City of Moreno Valley, California, Project No. 111061-108,” by Leighton and 
50
Associates, Inc. April 30, 2008.
51
 
World Logistics Center Project
Draft Environmental Impact Report
4.6-2 Geology and Soils Section 4.6
 
 
“Update Geotechnical Report, Moreno Highlands Specific Plan Area, Southeast Corner of 
1
Highway 60 and Redlands Boulevard, City of Moreno Valley, California, Project No. 111061-108,” 
2
by Leighton and Associates, Inc. July 21, 2008.
3
 
“Preliminary Geotechnical Evaluation for Environmental Impact Report, “The Highlands Specific 
4
Plan,” South of Highway 60 between Redlands Boulevard and Gilman Springs Road, City of 
5
Moreno Valley, California, Project No. 111061-127”, by Leighton and Associates, Inc. December 
6
13, 2011.
7
In addition, the analysis contained in this section is based on the following reference documents:
89
 
Moreno Valley General Plan, Safety Element, July 11, 2006;
10
 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Soil Survey
11
Geographic (SSURGO) database for Western Riverside Area, California, September 15, 2003;
12
and
13
 
Geotechnical reports, comments, and responses to comments on geotechnical issues from the
14
Westridge, Skechers, and ProLogis Environmental Impact Reports (various dates).
15
4.6.1 Existing Setting
16
The City lies within the Perris Block, a structural unit that is located within the Peninsular Range
17
Geomorphic Province, one of the major geologic provinces of southern California. The Perris Block is
18
a large mass of granitic rock generally bounded by the San Jacinto Fault, the Elsinore Fault, the
19
Santa Ana River, and a non-defined southeast boundary. The Perris Block has had a history of
20
vertical land movements of several thousand feet due to shifts in the Elsinore and San Jacinto Faults.
21
The materials within the valley area are characterized by Pliocene-Pleistocene-aged alluvium ranging
22
from relatively thin (20 feet to 200 feet) to intermediate thickness (up to 2,000 feet), which overlies the
23
older granitic bedrock. The rocky, mountainous areas, including the Box Springs Mountains and the
24
Mount Russell/Lake Perris State Recreation area, have underlying granitic bedrock that consists of
25
quartz diorite, and displays granite rock outcrops and large boulders. The Badlands range, at the
26
eastern end of the area, comprises deposits of what was once an inland sea later elevated and
27
deformed by geologic processes, before becoming severely eroded to its present state. This area
28
consists of folded semi-consolidated sedimentary sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The proposed
29
project is located within the northern portion of the San Jacinto Valley, a fault-bounded tectonic basin
30
that has evolved from movement along the San Jacinto fault system resulting in a down-dropped
31
northwest-trending trough.
3233
The existing setting for geology and soils includes faulting and seismicity, soils, and geologic and
34
seismic hazards, which are discussed below.
353637
4.6.1.1 Faulting and Seismicity
38
Pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 2690
et seq 
. Leighton & Associates prepared a
39
geotechnical report that analyzes the seismic hazards underlying the project site. Much of the
40
information set forth below and throughout this document is taken from that report. The proposed
41
project site, like the rest of Southern California, is located within a seismically active region as a result
42
of being located near the active margin between the North American and Pacific tectonic plates. The
43
principal source of seismic activity is movement along the northwest-trending regional fault systems
44
such as the San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore Fault Zones. Currently, these fault systems
45
accommodate up to approximately 55 millimeters per year (mm/yr) of slip between the plates. The on-
46
site San Jacinto Fault Zone is estimated to accommodate slip of approximately 12 mm/yr. However,
47
geodetic measurements between 1973 and 1981 show that the San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults
48
 
World Logistics Center Project
Draft Environmental Impact Report
Section 4.6 Geology and Soils 4.6-3
 
currently have comparable strain rates. It has been estimated that an average slip rate of as much as
1
20 mm/yr occurs for the San Jacinto Fault. The San Jacinto Fault zone presents a substantial seismic
2
hazard in Southern California.
34
By definition of the California Geological Survey, an active fault is a fault, which has had surface
5
displacement within Holocene time (about the last 11,000 years). This definition is used in delineating
6
Earthquake Fault Zones as mandated by the Alquist-Priolo Geologic Hazards Zones Act of 1972 and
7
as most recently revised in 2007 as the Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Act and Earthquake
8
Fault Zones. The intent of this act is to require fault investigations on sites located within Earthquake
9
Fault Zones to ensure that certain inhabited structures are not constructed across the traces of active
10
faults. The nearest Alquist-Priolo zoned “active faults” is the on-site Claremont Segment of the San
11
Jacinto Fault Zone (see Figure 4.6.1). The western portion of the site is crossed by the City of Moreno
12
Valley Seismic Zone and the postulated trace of the Casa Loma Fault. The nearest off-site fault
13
zones include Casa Loma Segment of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, located 1.6 miles to the south, the
14
San Andreas Fault Zone, located 12.7 miles northeast, and the Glen Ivy Segment of the Elsinore
15
Fault is located approximately 22.7 miles to the southwest of the site.
161718
4.6.1.2 Soils
19
Based on the
Soil Survey of Western Riverside County,
the project area contains 20 different soil-
20
mapping units belonging to 10 different soil series. (See Table 4.6.A below and Figure 4.2.1 in
21
Section 4.2.) A soil series is a group of soils with similar profiles. These profiles include major
22
horizons with similar thickness, arrangement, and other distinct characteristics. The project site is
23
dominated by San Emigdio loam (SgA and SgC) and San Emigdio fine sandy loam (SeC2), with
24
smaller inclusions of Arbuckle loam (AkC), Badland (BaG), Gorgonio loamy sand (GhC), Greenfield
25
sandy loam (GyA, GyD2), Hanford coarse sandy loam (HcC and HcD2), Metz loamy sand (MdC and
26
MeD), Metz loamy fine sand (MfA), Metz gravelly sandy loam (MID), Ramona sandy loam (RdD2),
27
Rockland (RtF), San Emigdio fine sandy loam (SeA and SeD2), and San Timoteo loam (SmE2).
1
 
28
4.6.1.3 Geologic and Seismic Hazards
29
Geologic and seismic hazards discussed in this subsection include the following:
3031
 
Surface rupture;
32
 
Ground shaking;
33
 
Liquefaction;
34
 
Subsidence and seismic settlement;
35
 
Landslides/slope stability; and
36
 
Compressible, expansive and collapsible soils.
3738
Surface Rupture.
Surface rupture occurs where displacement or fissuring occurs along a fault zone.
39
While primary ground damage due to earthquake fault rupture typically results in a relatively small
40
percentage of the total damage in an earthquake, the location of structures or facilities too close to a
41
rupturing fault can cause profound damage. It is difficult to reduce the hazards of surface rupture
42
through structural design. The primary method to avoid this hazard is to either set structures and
43
facilities away from active faults, or avoid their construction in close proximity to an active fault.
4445
1
Habitat Assessment, MSHCP Consistency Analysis, and HANS Review Highland Fairview Specific Plan City of MorenoValley, Riverside County, California, November 10, 2011.

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