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Refugee Livelihoods in Urban Areas: Identifying Program Opportunities Case Study Egypt

Refugee Livelihoods in Urban Areas: Identifying Program Opportunities Case Study Egypt

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Refugees in urban areas face a specific set of livelihoods problems, and in recent years many aid agencies have begun to try to address these problems by supporting refugees through vocational training, microcredit and other services. So far, however, there has been little evidence about which humanitarian programs work, and where opportunities for programming interventions lie. This study, funded by the US State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, addresses this knowledge gap. Through case studies in Cairo, Tel Aviv and Quito, we analyzed the urban livelihoods context for refugees and identified programming opportunities and promising program initiatives. In each city, we sought to generate new ideas from related fields of inquiry, such as low-income urban development and youth employment,that could be adapted for refugees in countries of first asylum.

Our three case studies represent contrasting refugee policy contexts and livelihoods experience, and offer lessons for other host settings. Each case study begins with a review of existing livelihood programs in the country. This includes a mapping of commercial, humanitarian and governmental organizations that provide programming, advocacy or other resources that support the livelihoods of refugees, migrants and low-income citizens. We then interviewed asylum seekers and key informants to deepen our understanding of the livelihoods context in each country. Our main program recommendations, based on all three cases, are included as a stand-alone document.
Refugees in urban areas face a specific set of livelihoods problems, and in recent years many aid agencies have begun to try to address these problems by supporting refugees through vocational training, microcredit and other services. So far, however, there has been little evidence about which humanitarian programs work, and where opportunities for programming interventions lie. This study, funded by the US State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, addresses this knowledge gap. Through case studies in Cairo, Tel Aviv and Quito, we analyzed the urban livelihoods context for refugees and identified programming opportunities and promising program initiatives. In each city, we sought to generate new ideas from related fields of inquiry, such as low-income urban development and youth employment,that could be adapted for refugees in countries of first asylum.

Our three case studies represent contrasting refugee policy contexts and livelihoods experience, and offer lessons for other host settings. Each case study begins with a review of existing livelihood programs in the country. This includes a mapping of commercial, humanitarian and governmental organizations that provide programming, advocacy or other resources that support the livelihoods of refugees, migrants and low-income citizens. We then interviewed asylum seekers and key informants to deepen our understanding of the livelihoods context in each country. Our main program recommendations, based on all three cases, are included as a stand-alone document.

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Published by: Feinstein International Center on Feb 14, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Refugee Livelihoods in Urban Areas:Identifying Program Opportunities
Case study Egypt 
Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practiceOctober 2012
 
©2012 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Cover photo by Themba LewisFair use of this copyrighted material includes its use for non-commercial educationalpurposes, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and news
reporting. Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image fi
les from this publication for such uses may do so without the Feinstein InternationalCenter’s express permission. However, all commercial use of this material and/orreproduction that alters its meaning or intent, without the express permission of theFeinstein International Center, is prohibited.Feinstein International CenterTufts University114 Curtis StreetSomerville, MA 02144USAtel: +1 617.627.3423fax: +1 617.627.3428
fic.tufts.edu
 
Refugee Livelihoods in Urban Areas: Identifying Program Opportunities / Case Study Cairo, Egypt
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Suggested citation
Feinstein International Center, 2012.
Refugee Livelihoods in Urban Areas: Iden- tifying Program Opportunities. Case study Egypt.
Feinstein International Center,Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, USA.
Acknowledgements
Field research for this report was made possible by the excellent work of eightresearch assistants -- Ahmed Mohamed Amin, Ahmed Naji, Basim Ibrahim,Biniam Habtemariam, Hannah Huser, Noha Osman, Rasha Salem and Santo Wol
-- and Najia Mohamed, who coordinated the field work, and helped write the re
-port. All of them were able to carry out their tasks with great professionalism anddedication in spite of the instability in Cairo during the past year. Lorena Guzmán
Elizalde managed the field team throughout the turmoil with amazing capability,and contributed to the final report. Rebecca Furst-Nichols provided project man
-agement, advice and support. Karen Jacobsen, Principal Investigator, guided thefull research process. Special thanks to Themba Lewis and Shane Bristow whoshared their photographs, and to Caritas-Refugee Services and UNHCR in Egyptfor providing invaluable information. The staff at Feinstein International Centermanaged the budget, travel and administrative procedures. Finally, we recognizeand thank our interviewees in Cairo, who were willing to share their experiences,and who are a life example for all of us.The research was paid for by American taxpayers, and we thank the US Depart-ment of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration for funding thisproject.

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