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Designing for Kids – Cute Little Frog by Terry Hill

Designing for Kids – Cute Little Frog by Terry Hill

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Published by airbrushactionmag
A big part of being a T-shirt artist–or being in any business is knowing your market and how to capture its attention. This article focuses on young children. It isn’t about the average spring-breaker; we have plenty of designs for them. This is about their little brothers and sisters, whom we hope will grow up to be party-animal buyers.
A big part of being a T-shirt artist–or being in any business is knowing your market and how to capture its attention. This article focuses on young children. It isn’t about the average spring-breaker; we have plenty of designs for them. This is about their little brothers and sisters, whom we hope will grow up to be party-animal buyers.

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: airbrushactionmag on Feb 14, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/14/2014

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Airbrush Action, Inc. has been offeringAirbrush Action magazine
 
,airbrush workshops (Airbrush Getaway), airbrush books, airbrushes,and airbrush DVDs and videos since 1985. As the World's leadingairbrush publication for 28 years, we provide our readers anunprecedented combination of value and best service in the industry.We offer over 100 instructionalairbrushDVDs, the largest and bestquality in the industry.
 Airbrush Action Tip N’ Tricks
Designing for Kids – CuteLittle Frog by Terry Hill
http://www.airbrushaction.com/567/designing-for-kids-cute-little-frog-by-terry-hill/ A big part of being a
T-shirt artist
 –or being in any business is knowing your market and how to capture itsattention. This article focuses on young children. It isn’t about the average spring-breaker; we have plenty of designs for them. This is about their little brothers and sisters, whom we hope will grow up to beparty-animal buyers.The kid market is potentially the most stable-remember, many parents have a hard time saying “no.” Thepoint is to capture children as customers now and ensure that they stay customers. I’m at a considerabledisadvantage when it comes to designing for kids, because I have none. I don’t have any idea what thehottest doll or collector card or video game is at any given moment, so I listen closely to my customers.Through them I stay aware of what’s happening. I’ve determined that there are basically two types of kids:sweet, passive innocents or loud, obnoxious terrors. This standard appears to apply to both girls and boys.In this article I present a design solution for each type. For those angels there’s “
Cute Little Frog
,” and for the terrors, “Aggressive White Shark.” I’ll also discuss proper stenciling techniques and offer advice on howto choose color properly to create more impact.To be successful in the T-shirt business you have to keep abreast of trends and react quickly to events. For example, a savvy artist could have a design worked up and painted within hours of an extreme weather eventsuch as a flood, hurricane, or earthquake (“I survived … etc.”)
 
Teenagers are also an important, but fickle, market. Airbrushed T-shirts may be cool one month and totallyout the next. The mid- to late 1980s-when the preppy look was popular, followed by the grunge rocker lookwere the low point. You couldn’t give teenagers airbrushed shirts.Thankfully things have changed, and for the past seven years, sales have been up in both our local andtraveling businesses. Younger kids are the one group that will probably always buy airbrushed products.Focus a lot of effort on designing for them, and you will see returns. Display your kid designs at their eyelevel. Often, children will fall in love with a certain item and won’t leave without it, no matter what the parentsdo.The average price of a child’s airbrushed shirt is $16 to $24, including the shirt, and the designs featured inthis article r6ughly represent both extremes. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t have things available for $10. You have to cover all the bases and make sure you have something for every budget. Offering a largedesign on the back of a shirt and suggesting customers put a small pocket name on the front is a nice wayto build sales. You’ll be surprised how much this option can make you in a day. It’s a lot like going to afast-food restaurant and being asked if you’d like to enlarge your order for 29 cents. People usually say“yes.” A salesman at a state fair taught me a valuable lesson once: “If you come out here and ask for quartersyou’re going to go home with a bag of quarters. If you ask for dollars, you’ll go home with dollars. I choose toask for twenties.
Cute Little Frog
Step 1:I usually begin the design process by creating rough sketches. I’ve found that sketching with a light bluepencil is liberating. It removes some of the pressure and allows me to stay loose; when you miss a line or aperspective it’s easy to correct. I started this sketch with two basic shapes: an oval representing the mass
 
and angel of his head, and a V shape to create the flow of the legs.Step 2: After I’m satisfied with the rough composition it’s time to refine and correct. I use tracing paper for this. Isimply trace the parts that are correct and redraw anything that’s bothering me. A neat trick is to flip thepaper over and look at your drawing from the opposite side. If it looks good from both sides, your drawinghas balance.

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