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Tantanoola Tiger (1931)

Tantanoola Tiger (1931)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Adelaide Advertiser 1931 (March 6)
Adelaide Advertiser 1931 (March 6)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Feb 25, 2013
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Advertiser and Register (Adelaide, SA : 1931), Friday 6 March 1931, page 21National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74662525
TANTANOOLA
TIGER
YETAGAIN?
Strange
SoundNearLakeBonneyTHEFAMOUS
SCARE
The
'strange
rumbling
noises''
reportedfromLake
Bonney
willrecalltomany
old
timers
si
picturesquechapter
ofSouth-Easternhistorv.Nearly
fiftyyearsago.settlers
near
theother
LakeBonney
also
heard
queernoisesfromtheswamps.
In
those
simpler
and
more
romantic
days,thesound
was
at
once
put
downto
the
Bunyip.
Thetroubledidnotendthere,however,for
cows
were
bitten,sheep
disappeared,
andhorsesand
dogs
were
panic
stricken
bystrange
sights
ana
noises.TheTantanoolatigerhad
en
tered
uponits
mysterious
career.
TheCircusCubIn1893,the
SS.
'Star,'
piquedby
sensational
accounts
intheMelbournepress,gave
a
briefandscepticalhis
tory
ofthebeast.'Wehavefirst'itsaid,'anebulous
theory
that
a
cub
was
lost
from
a
circus
13
yearsago:
then,
after
an
intervalof
some
eight
or
tenyears,
someone
hears
a
pecu
liar
grunting
noisein
a
titreeswampwhich
he
concluded
to
becaused
by
the
renowned
butunknown
Bunyip;
butwhich
isbow
attributed
tothe
equally
unknownTiger.Thenanotherrestof
some
years,and
a
cow
is
bitten
by
some
ferociousmarauderoftheforest—thetigeragain.Then
sheep
are
killedandthebodies
disappear
withdie
exception
of
heads,
skins,
enc
shankbones,and
itis
averredthattigershave
no
particular
likingfor
sheens'
heads.
...'
.
.
The'Star'had
itsown
theory
aboutthe
tiger,
forsheep,
it
remarkecpointedly,had
frequentlydisappeared
inthedistrictbefore,'andtheirloss
couldquite
definitelybetracedtothe
genus
homo.'Others
were
not
so
sceptical,
ior,
in
the
same
year,Mr.C.
MacKenzie
of
fered£50rewardfortheanimal
ifcap
turedalive,and£25forthe
carcase,
'with
anew
suitofclothesthrownin.'Thepoliceauthoritiestook
an
eauallvseriousviewofthecreature,end
Mounted-Constables
RussellandFoote,witii
a
blacktrackerfromthe
Diamentina,
and
numerous
assistants.
organised
severalsearchparties.Forweeksthey
investigated
thescrub
aroundPaltridge
&Co.'s
run
atLateBonneywhere
one
Donald
Smitnnafl
actually
seen
a
tiger.
carryaway
a
sheep.
Mr.George
Biddoch,
memberfor
the
district,wasone
ofthemast
enthusiasticsupporters
ofthe
&fer
huntTand
notonlysubscribed
£5to
 
OOLDENSCISSORS
were
presented
totheGovernor-SlrMeander
Hore-B«(^»)
^^'^^^^1
sen.
(rirbt)
on
behalf
ofthecontractors
(Mesas.Essery
and
Cartledge)
a*theopeningortfte
Wty
tillageyes
terday.
The
EordMayor(Mr.Glover)
isinthe
middle.
?
?
i
wards
expenses,
but
engaged
innego
tiationsfor
two
boarhounds
and
a
numberof
staghounds.
The
black
trackerdidsucceedin
finding
some
marks
neartiie
Duckhole,
'large,butindistinctprintsfromthetreadof
some
beast;'but
nothing
more
conclusive
was
discovered.
Acrossthe
Border
TheTantanoolatiger,inthe
mean
tune,
was
thought
to
havecrossedtheborder,forthenextappearance
wasat
Coleraine,where
'a
strange,
roaringanimal'
was
reported.It
was
also
seen
doseto
Willunga,
anddisturbedthedreamsofminersin
Bendigo.
One
Indefatigable
Mr.Riddochnext
engaged
two
Afghans,
whohadhad
some
tiger
shootingexperience
hiIndia.
Equipped
withpoliceguns
andwith
horsesand
provisionssuppliedby
Mr.
Biddoch,they
huntedtheelusive
beast
asa
speculation,'£100rewardforcapture,and
nothing
at
all
forfailure.'Scoresofhorsemen
were
also
out
on
thehuntjust
over
the
border;
for.
by
thistime,thetiger
was
appearing
with
alarmingfrequency
allover
themap
now
atMount
Macedon,
now
atBendigo,and
even
inthestreetsof
a
Victorian
township.
IthadnotentirelydesertedTantanoolaeither,forinMay.1895,Mr.B.T.White'averyreliable
man,'caught
a
glimpse
of
a
strange.6triped
beastthereattheverymomenthiswife,safely
asleep
at
home,
was
dreamingagain(according
to'OurMountGambier
correspondent')
thatherhusband
was
being
bitten
by
theTantanoolatiger.
TheTigerShot
On
August
2,
1895,thewhole
story
took
a
most
sensational
turn.
One,
Mr.
Donovan,
was
reported
tohaveshotatSaltCreek
a
strange
ninmai
whichprovedto
be
a
striped
wolf.Mr.
Minchin.
oftheAdelaide
Zoological
Gardens,
Judged,
fromthedescription,thatit
wasvery
likethewolvesintheZoo,here,andsaidthat,
as
thistype
was
bredinVictoria,there
was
nothing
reallyincredibleabout
its
appearancehithebush.Thecreature
was
duly
stuffedandexhibitedin
a
SouthEasternhotel
as
'TheTantanoolatiger,'andbrought
a
greatdealof
fameandcustom.
All
over
Australia
fameandcustom.
All
over
Australia
it
was
confidentlyreported
thatthefearful
spectre
hadbeenlaidfor
ever.
TheTiger
Again
Curiouslyenough,
thetiger
now
en
tered
into
what
was,
on
the
whole,
themost
Interestingphase
of
Itscareer.
Only
a
few
monthsafterthe
shooting,
It
appearedbodily
at
Tantanoola,
andthereafter
a
numberof
respectablewitnesses
periodically
beheld
itmore
clearlythan'ever—notstuffedandharmless,butlarge,roaring,
andfearsome.
There
is
an
interestingandmostcircumstantialaccountof
its
appear
ance
to
a
youth
named
Beardmore,
who
was
taking
some
clothes
on
thebackof
a
mule
to
the
AverfeddyRiver,
wherehissister
was
doing
the
familywashing.
Alargebeast,
'twice
as
large
asa
bigdog,
and
striped
like
a
tiger.'
came
suddenlyout
of
thebush,atwhichthemule
stopped
deadandde
clined
to
budge.
On
recovering
from
its
fright
it
rapidly
madefor
home.
Alittle
whileafterwardstheaster
ap
peared,
pale
withtenor,anddeclaredthatthetiger
hadinterrupted
her
washing.
The
verynextyear
theMountGambler
correspondent
describesthe
strange
plightofMr.H.
Grosser,
son
ofthewell-known
pigeon
shotand
sportsman.
This
youth
was
shooting
at
Buck's
Ford,
near
Carpenter's
Bocks,whenheandhisthree
dogs
were
startled
by
the'sudden
appearance
of
a
large
tigeramongthe
high
tussocks.'
The
dogs
setup
a
terrific
howling,andthen
disappeared,
andthetigersatupon
its
haunches,
like
a
cat
or
a
dog,
and
looked
atMr.Grosser.As
it
was
only15yards
away,
and
it
was
broad
daylight,hehad
a
goodlook
at
it.
Itappeared
to
beaboutthreefeet
high,
andfourfeetlong,with
a
flexible
tail,
and
Its
skin
was
striped.WhileMr.Grosser
was
mating
theseobservations,thetiger
crouched,
as
iftospring,andhevery
wiselydodged
behind
a
tussockand
escaped.
Seve
ral
other
'persons,
observedthe
corres
pondent,had
seen
theanimal
near
the
same
spot,'but
not
insuchadvan
tageous
circumstances.'
Newspaper
readers,
if
they
were
wise,

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