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Table Of Contents

Introduction
1.1 References
2.1 Continuous population models for single species
2.1.1 Investigating the dynamics
2.1.2 Linearising about a stationary point
2.1.3 Insect outbreak model
Chapter 2. Spatially independent models for a single species 13
2.1.4 Harvesting a single natural population
Chapter 2. Spatially independent models for a single species 17
2.2 Discrete population models for a single species
Chapter 2. Spatially independent models for a single species 20
2.2.1 Linear stability
2.2.2 Further investigation
Chapter 2. Spatially independent models for a single species 24
Chapter 2. Spatially independent models for a single species 25
2.2.3 The wider context
3.1 Predator-prey models
3.1.1 Finite predation
3.2 A look at global behaviour
3.2.1 Nullclines
3.2.2 The Poincar´e-Bendixson Theorem
3.3 Competitive exclusion
3.4 Mutualism (symbiosis)
3.5 Interacting discrete models
Enzyme kinetics
4.1 The Law of Mass Action
4.2 Michaelis-Menten kinetics
4.2.1 Non-dimensionalisation
4.2.2 Singular perturbation investigation
4.3 More complex systems
4.3.1 Several enzyme reactions and the pseudo-steady state hypothesis
4.3.2 Allosteric enzymes
4.3.3 Autocatalysis and activator-inhibitor systems
Introduction to spatial variation
5.1 Derivation of the reaction-diffusion equations
6.1.1 Key points
6.1.2 Existence and the phase plane
6.1.3 Relation between the travelling wave speed and initial conditions
6.2 Models of epidemics
6.2.1 The SIR model
6.2.2 An SIR model with spatial heterogeneity
Pattern formation
7.1 Minimum domains for spatial structure
7.1.1 Domain size
7.2 Diffusion-driven instability
7.2.1 Linear analysis
7.3 Detailed study of the conditions for a Turing instability
7.3.1 Stability without diffusion
7.3.2 Instability with diffusion
7.3.3 Summary
7.3.4 The threshold of a Turing instability
7.4 Extended example 1
7.4.1 The influence of domain size
7.5 Extended example 2
8.1.2 Capacitance
8.2 Deducing the Fitzhugh Nagumo equations
8.2.1 Space-clamped axon
8.3 A brief look at the Fitzhugh Nagumo equations
8.3.1 The (n,v) phase plane
8.4 Modelling the propagation of nerve signals
8.4.1 The cable model
The phase plane
A.1 Properties of the phase plane portrait
A.2 Equilibrium points
A.2.1 Equilibrium points: further properties
A.3 Summary
A.4 Investigating solutions of the linearised equations
A.4.1 Case I
A.4.2 Case II
A.4.3 Case III
A.5 Linear stability
A.5.1 Technical point
A.6 Summary
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Baker 2011 MathBioNotes2011

Baker 2011 MathBioNotes2011

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Published by: mosk2708 on Feb 25, 2013
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