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Gradually the World- New and Selected Poems, 1982 – 2013 by Burt Kimmelman Book Preview

Gradually the World- New and Selected Poems, 1982 – 2013 by Burt Kimmelman Book Preview

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Published by BlazeVOX [books]
Gradually the World: New and Selected Poems, 1982 - 2013

The specificity of Burt Kimmelman's poems has, for more than thirty years, been a singularly locating force. It situates us in space, in relation to the luminosity of objects, art, and one another. That every shadow of wonder can stand forth in the most familiar words is the gift this poet offers his readers time and again.
– Susan Howe

Praise for Burt Kimmelman's Earlier Poetry

“A rare evocation . . . the wonder of this world in itself.”
– Robert Creeley

“Artful, fastidious, learned . . . I am delighted by so much feeling for style.”
– Alfred Kazin

“A strict & powerful accounting, leaving me – for one – filled with admiration & hooked on every word.”
– Jerome Rothenberg

“Form calls deeply to form, as though the works … lifted one to the very brim of language….”
– Michael Heller

“Few contemporary poets so gracefully demonstrate classic notions of what the practice of poetry must be.”
– Madeline Tiger, Jacket

“Exceptionally intelligent and necessary . . ."
-– Ed Foster, Poetry Project Newsletter

“His confidence lies with the poem itself, that he has found it (or that it has found him)….”
– Norman Finkelstein, The Offending Adam

“[In Kimmelman's poems] the arts restate the questions we have been asking and the ways they clean and stretch our questions reward us more than answers would.”
– William Bronk

“As quiet an experience as anyone could wish for.”
– Cid Corman

“He finds what is luminously transcendent….”
– Harvey Shapiro

“Worth our own best attention. ”
– John Taggart

“Attains ‘the simple … facts’.”
– Samuel Menashe

“A verse so delicate and so far from insistence….”
– Karl Young, Light & Dust

“Kimmelman's quiet poems contain the luminescence of perception, its lure, its beauty, its Zen of breath, tracing beauty in the pulse of the extant."
-Star Black

“Kimmelman's poems attest to the simple majesties of being, the massive implications of the everyday."
– Eric Hoffman, Rain Taxi




Burt Kimmelman has published seven previous collections of poetry: The Way We Live (2011), As If Free ( 2009), There Are Words (2007), Somehow (2005), The Pond at Cape May Point (2002), a collaboration with the painter Fred Caruso, First Life (2000), and Musaics (1992). He has also published a number of book-length literary studies as well as scores of critical articles on medieval, modern, and contemporary poetry. In the 1980s and 1990s he was the senior editor of the now defunct Poetry New York: A Journal of Poetry and Translation.

Kimmelman was born and raised in New York City and now lives in a nearby suburb with his wife the writer Diane Simmons. He teaches literary and cultural studies at New Jersey Institute of Technology.

Recent interviews of Kimmelman are available online: with Tom Fink in Jacket2 (text) and with George Spencer at Poetry Thin Air (video). Additional information and internet links can be found at BurtKimmelman.com.



Book Information:

· Paperback: 252 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-134-4
$18



Gradually the World: New and Selected Poems, 1982 - 2013

The specificity of Burt Kimmelman's poems has, for more than thirty years, been a singularly locating force. It situates us in space, in relation to the luminosity of objects, art, and one another. That every shadow of wonder can stand forth in the most familiar words is the gift this poet offers his readers time and again.
– Susan Howe

Praise for Burt Kimmelman's Earlier Poetry

“A rare evocation . . . the wonder of this world in itself.”
– Robert Creeley

“Artful, fastidious, learned . . . I am delighted by so much feeling for style.”
– Alfred Kazin

“A strict & powerful accounting, leaving me – for one – filled with admiration & hooked on every word.”
– Jerome Rothenberg

“Form calls deeply to form, as though the works … lifted one to the very brim of language….”
– Michael Heller

“Few contemporary poets so gracefully demonstrate classic notions of what the practice of poetry must be.”
– Madeline Tiger, Jacket

“Exceptionally intelligent and necessary . . ."
-– Ed Foster, Poetry Project Newsletter

“His confidence lies with the poem itself, that he has found it (or that it has found him)….”
– Norman Finkelstein, The Offending Adam

“[In Kimmelman's poems] the arts restate the questions we have been asking and the ways they clean and stretch our questions reward us more than answers would.”
– William Bronk

“As quiet an experience as anyone could wish for.”
– Cid Corman

“He finds what is luminously transcendent….”
– Harvey Shapiro

“Worth our own best attention. ”
– John Taggart

“Attains ‘the simple … facts’.”
– Samuel Menashe

“A verse so delicate and so far from insistence….”
– Karl Young, Light & Dust

“Kimmelman's quiet poems contain the luminescence of perception, its lure, its beauty, its Zen of breath, tracing beauty in the pulse of the extant."
-Star Black

“Kimmelman's poems attest to the simple majesties of being, the massive implications of the everyday."
– Eric Hoffman, Rain Taxi




Burt Kimmelman has published seven previous collections of poetry: The Way We Live (2011), As If Free ( 2009), There Are Words (2007), Somehow (2005), The Pond at Cape May Point (2002), a collaboration with the painter Fred Caruso, First Life (2000), and Musaics (1992). He has also published a number of book-length literary studies as well as scores of critical articles on medieval, modern, and contemporary poetry. In the 1980s and 1990s he was the senior editor of the now defunct Poetry New York: A Journal of Poetry and Translation.

Kimmelman was born and raised in New York City and now lives in a nearby suburb with his wife the writer Diane Simmons. He teaches literary and cultural studies at New Jersey Institute of Technology.

Recent interviews of Kimmelman are available online: with Tom Fink in Jacket2 (text) and with George Spencer at Poetry Thin Air (video). Additional information and internet links can be found at BurtKimmelman.com.



Book Information:

· Paperback: 252 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-134-4
$18



More info:

Published by: BlazeVOX [books] on Feb 26, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/11/2015

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original

 
 
G
RADUALLY THE
 W 
ORLD
:
N
EW AND
S
ELECTED
P
OEMS
,
 
1982
 
-
 
2013B
URT
IMMELMAN
 
B L A Z E V O X [ B O O K S ]
Buffalo, New York
 
 
 
Gradually the World: New and Selected Poems, 1982 – 2013
by Burt KimmelmanCopyright © 2013Cover art,
Transition 
, by Basil King Interior art, drawings from
The Hudson River School 
series, by Basil King  Art photos by Ani Berberian Author photo by Diane SimmonsInterior design and typesetting by Geoffrey GatzaPublished by BlazeVOX [books] All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced withoutthe publisher’s written permission, except for brief quotations in reviews.Printed in the United States of AmericaFirst EditionISBN: 978-1-60964-134-4Library of Congress Control Number: 2013932522BlazeVOX [books]131 Euclid AveKenmore, NY 14217Editor@blazevox.org 
p
ublisher of weird little books
 
BlazeVOX [ books ]
blazevox.org 
 
21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
 
 
 
23
LipsI shave my face and think of how this act,in the eyes of a boy, is what makes hima man, this ritual, the razor's edgescraping skin and a careless cut welling blood, this strange pleasure. I pull my cheek taut with a fingertip, then examine my contorted mouth. I see there my father'slips, for a moment, thin and primly closed,and my mother's full lips, parted slightly to say something against his indifference,perhaps, only to think better of it. Yet somehow in the mirror my lips aremy own, even with my parents' facesbefore me, and their delicate mouths mostof all, as they were when, a small child,I used to look up at them, listening to what they were saying to me. Now their words are my words, this poem, their kisses,too, my kisses, come of that union long ago. I never saw them kissing, though,never an embrace, and in their old age,I with a daughter, they perished apart.I found my dead father, his head resting on a pillow, in his death mask his lips wrenched sideways, twisted as if, in wanting to utter a final thought, he had soughtan elusive breath of air. My mother,dead, was held in a dream of a deep lake,one morning in her bed, a dried trickleof blood at the corner of her mouth, herlips joined in the fullness of silence. Whatin the end did I owe them but to leavethem each a final kiss on their cold flesh?

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