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NIE Week

NIE Week

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NIE Week
NIE Week

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Published by: Lancaster Newspapers, Inc on Feb 26, 2013
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08/01/2013

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2 MARCH 5, 2013 NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION L
ancaster
, P
a
Dar Radrs,
We know that you will enjoy our 29th Annual NIE Week specialsection, which exhibits the award-winning results of our Design An Ad & Journalism Contests. The purpose of this special section is to promoteliteracy, to showcase outstanding student writing and graphic ability, and to recognize classroom teachers for their efforts and encouragement to thenext generation of creative thinkers.The printing of this 40 page-page special section is made possible due tothe nancial support of 27 local businesses listed on the last page. Throughtheir generosity this special section will reach readers of the Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Era on Tuesday, March 5, 2013.Approximately 1,600 students from Grades 2 to 12 in 92 differentclasses in public, private, and home schools submitted hand-drawn and computer-designed ads for the Design An Ad Contest. Each class wasassigned one of the twenty-seven advertisers who in turn selected the ad which would represent their own business in this special section. Many of these advertisers support this project year after year. We are grateful for theencouragement they give to the young artists.More than 300 students from Grades K and 1 submitted Illustrated Headlines taken from the pages of the Intelligencer Journal/ Lancaster  New Era. Approximately 1,500 students in Grades 2 - 5 participated inthe Writer’s Choice category. News Features captured the interest of morethan 1,200 writers in Grades 6-8. Approximately 450 students in Grades9-12 entered their work in Editorials and Photojournalism.Our literacy partner, the Lancaster-Lebanon Reading Council (LLRC)tackled the task of selecting approximately ten to twelve seminalists fromeach grade level in each category of the Journalism Contest as semi-nalists.They used a standardized rubric, which was available to all participatingteachers, to select the seminalists. The LLRC in collaboration with theeditorial staff then selected the nalists.Each year the LLRC and the Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Erahosts a reception for the 1st place winners. Turkey Hill Dairy and JuliusSturgis Pretzels, as well as the LLRC, generously provided the refreshmentsfor this reception.You, the readers, will see the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and honorable mention places. Additionally the NIE staff gave the teachers the option of selectingone entry from each of their classes which they thought deserved specialrecognition in the nal publication if the piece was not selected asa nalist.The Lancaster Newspapers, Inc. is proud of all of the entries and appreciates the efforts and enthusiasm of both the students and teacherswho spend countless hours brainstorming, editing, and submitting their work. Please turn the pages and enjoy the creativity and talents of our localstudents.
 Jans Harrngton
 Marketing Specialist 
Lancaster Newspapers, Inc. jharrington@LNPnews.com
Sarah Whyler 
Grade 12
Pnn Manor HSTachr: Cc O’Day 
According to Jim Tracy, aheadmaster in Massachusetts,“students inhabit a 21st centuryworld for 18 hours a day, and alltoo often, educators put them ina 19th century classroom for sixhours of that day, and the studentsfeel a tremendous disconnect. Wehave a responsibility to teach themthe skills to optimize these tools”(Lytle). It is clear that the younggeneration is a generation consumed  by technology, and it is time for schools to step up and advance withtechnology and their students.At Penn Manor High School, thereis some integration, but not much.There are several computer labs and computer carts, but they are onlyused for some projects such as typinga paper, creating power points, or doing research. Most teachers donot go any further and don’t tryto add in any other multi-mediumlessons into their curriculum. Now,while the rule of the high schooldoes not allow students to have their cell phones out during school hours,most students do. Teenagers areoften consumed by their phones, sowhy not use them as a tool to helpeducate them. There are many newways/programs to integrate a phoneinto a lesson, but most teachers donot know how to use them and need to be taught how to integrate theminto their lessons.Technology could be used so muchmore in the classroom if the teachersknew how to use the technology and were given ideas on how to capturetheir student’s attention. If teacherswere given the opportunity to learnabout the new technology, theywould be able to help their studentsand let them use technology toteach the lessons. Stacey Roshan,an Advanced Placement calculusteacher at Bullis School, uses videolectures for her students to watchat home, so they have more timein class to work and ask questions.This gave her students a leg up onthe AP calculus test, and the scoreswent from a 3.59 average to a 4.11average (Lytle).Technology captures the attentionof students, so integrating it moreheavily into the classroom would go a long way. Schools cannot justsit back and keep using the same old ways to teach students. The world and their students are advancingaround them, so why should theyhold them back?
 WORk CiTeDLytl, Ryan. “Study: emrgngTchnology Has Postv impact nClassroom.” US Nws. U.S. Nws& World Rport, 14 July 2011, Wb. 23 Oct 2012. www.usnws.com/ducaton/hgh-schools/artcls/2011/07/14/study-mrgng-tchnology-has-postv-mpact-n-classroom.
Tech Heads
 Amanda Stoltzfus
 Marketing Specialist 
Lancaster Newspapers, Inc.astoltzfus@LNPnews.com
1st PLaCe
EDITORIAL
 
L
ancaster
, P
a
NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION MARCH 5, 2013 3
It’s not hard to believe that transfats are one of the leading causesof obesity. Trans fats are found inalmost all of the Americans favoritefoods such as: crackers, margarine,snack foods, fried foods, doughnuts,even processed foods. With anaverage intake of 5.8 grams of transfat each day, it has become evenharder not to become obese. Todaytrans fats are used in way too many bakery products, and prepared food  products, and should be limited.Trans fat is a type of fat that isformed when liquid fat is turned into a solid fat. This happens whenhydrogen atoms are added. Manycompanies use trans fat whencooking because it is cheaper, easier,and lasts a lot longer. Over time, thecontinuous consumption of transfats end up clogging the arteries.A diet that is high in trans fatscan lead to a heart attack, obesity,stroke, even the development of diabetes. Some better options of avoiding trans fats are to check thefood labels. Avoid foods that say“partially hydrogenated oils.” Alsostay away from deep fried oils.Instead, try using monounsaturated fats (olive oil and canola oil) or  polyunsaturated fats (soybeanoil, corn oil, and fatty fish suchas salmon.) These are the “good fats;” they are good for your heartand cholesterol. Not all food labels list the amountof trans fats that are in the product.However, just because “trans fat”isn’t listed on the label, doesn’tmean that there aren’t any in the product. Companies are figuring outa way of advertising trans fats on thelabels. If there is less than 0.5 grams per serving then they will consider the item to be “trans fat-free”. Thisshould help the consumers not to befooled by the food labels.
Trans Fat andthe Health Face to Face
 Amanda Nadu 
GRADE 11
Penn Manor HSTeacher:Mindy Rottmund
Stauffers ofKissel HillSupermarket
ad designed by
TIM MARTIN
Grade 5Resurrection Catholic Teacher: Kim Ingram
1st PLACE
EDITORIAL

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Patricia Gann added this note
Amy certainly has a wonderful sense of humor gravel and all. I'm sure you are very proud of her article. Mark, I'm so sorry you can't make it for Easter but June will probably be a better month weather wise. See you in June. Love Pat and Steve

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