Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
BAJR Guide 22 Website Building for Archaeology Projects

BAJR Guide 22 Website Building for Archaeology Projects

Ratings:

5.0

(3)
|Views: 3,171|Likes:
Published by David Connolly
This guide is designed to help you think about some of the things you might want to consider before building a website for your site or project, as well as to give some brief guidance to get you started. It also provides links to a few good examples now available on the Internet.

This document was created byMatthew Law, WikiArc (http://www.wikiarc.org)
Guy Hunt, L-P: Archaeology (http://www.lparchaeology.com)
David Connolly, BAJR (http://www.bajr.org)

with special thanks to Nick Corcos
This guide is designed to help you think about some of the things you might want to consider before building a website for your site or project, as well as to give some brief guidance to get you started. It also provides links to a few good examples now available on the Internet.

This document was created byMatthew Law, WikiArc (http://www.wikiarc.org)
Guy Hunt, L-P: Archaeology (http://www.lparchaeology.com)
David Connolly, BAJR (http://www.bajr.org)

with special thanks to Nick Corcos

More info:

Published by: David Connolly on Feb 24, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See More
See less

01/04/2013

 
Building a Websitefor your Project
BAJR Guide 22
BAJR/WikiArc Practical GuidebyMatthew Law, Guy Hunt and David ConnollyMarch 2009
 
Building a website for your project 
 This guide is designed to help you think about some of the things you might want to consider beforebuilding a website for your site or project, as well as to give some brief guidance to get you started. Italso provides links to a few good examples now available on the Internet. This document was created byMatthew Law, WikiArc (http://www.wikiarc.org)Guy Hunt, L-P: Archaeology (http://www.lparchaeology.com)David Connolly, BAJR (http://www.bajr.org)with special thanks to Nick Corcos
Don’t wait too long to get your project online!
 
Building a website for your project 
1. BEFORE YOU START
Always spend time planning what you want to include on your websitebefore you put anything online. Here are a few things you shouldconsider:
1.1 Who will visit the website?
You should think about who is likely to use the website, so you can builda site that they will find easy to use, informative and interesting. Visitorsmight include:
• Local people who want to know more about the area
 These people may be extremely interested in the work you are doing,but might not have much previous knowledge of archaeology, so it isimportant to provide information about what is going on that is clear, andnot too technical - never assume prior knowledge, but never talk down topeople either.
• Adults who want to get actively involved.
 This group could be local people (or not-so-local people, such asarchaeology students from universities) who want to work as volunteerson the project, so it is very important to give clear details of how they canhelp and whom they should contact.Don’t forget that not all volunteers will want to dig – some might prefer towork with finds or to carry out historical research, so remember to be clearabout what work is available for those who want to volunteer.
• Children.
If you are creating a website that is meant to express how much fun it isto be an archaeologist, or how great the project is for kids, then make sureit is not so full of facts and figures that it is just plain boring. Think aboutincluding games to play (there are a number of free resources out there),downloadable sheets and perhaps having an interactive zone.
• Groups wanting to visit the project.
 There might be groups (perhaps from schools or local history societies)who want to visit the site, so include information about who they shouldspeak to, and whether tours are available and if so when. You could evenprovide some useful background to the project, so they already know alittle about what you are doing and why when they arrive.
• Other archaeologists.
 They are likely to want far more technical information about specificaspects of the project (for example particular types of finds that have beenrecovered or how different features are located across the site) - althoughthey will probably welcome simple summaries as well!
Community archaeology at South Cadbury, Somerset. Photo by Matthew Law

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Ion Dumitrescu liked this
talactor liked this
David Connolly liked this
julius2655 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->