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Table Of Contents

Preface
Who should read this book?
How is this book structured?
A book for the community
Conventions
What’s next?
About the Authors
Contributors
Acknowledgements
Chapter 1 - Databases and information models
1.1 What is a database?
1.2 What is a database management system?
1.2.1 The evolution of database management systems
1.3 Introduction to information models and data models
1.4 Types of information models
1.4.1 Network model
1.4.2 Hierarchical model
1.4.3 Relational model
1.4.4 Entity-Relationship model
1.4.5 Object-relational model
1.4.6 Other data models
1.5 Typical roles and career path for database professionals
1.5.1 Data Architect
1.5.2 Database Architect
1.5.3 Database Administrator (DBA)
1.5.4 Application Developer
1.6 Summary
1.7 Exercises
1.8 Review questions
Chapter 2 – The relational data model
2.1 Relational data model: The big picture
2.2 Basic concepts
2.2.1 Attributes
2.2.2 Domains
2.2.3 Tuples
2.2.4 Relations
2.2.5 Schemas
2.2.6 Keys
2.3 Relational data model constraints
2.3.1 Entity integrity constraint
2.3.2 Referential integrity constraint
2.3.3 Semantic integrity constraints
2.4 Relational algebra
2.4.1 Union
2.4.2 Intersection
2.4.3 Difference
2.4.4 Cartesian product
2.4.5 Selection
2.4.6 Projection
2.4.7 Join
2.4.8 Division
2.5. Relational calculus
2.5.1 Tuple-oriented relational calculus
2.5.2 Domain-oriented relational calculus
2.6 Summary
2.7 Exercises
2.8 Review questions
Chapter 3 – The conceptual data model
3.1 Conceptual, logical and physical modeling: The big picture
3.2 What is a model?
3.2.1 Data model
3.2.2 Database model
3.2.3 Conceptual data model concepts
3.3 A case study involving a Library Management System - Part 1 of 3
3.3.1 Developing the conceptual model
3.4 Summary
3.5 Exercises
3.6 Review questions
Chapter 4 – Relational Database Design
4.1 The problem of redundancy
4.1.1 Insertion Anomalies
4.1.2 Deletion Anomalies
4.1.3 Update Anomalies
4.2. Decompositions
4.3. Functional Dependencies
4.4 Properties of Functional Dependencies
4.4.1 Armstrong’s Axioms
4.4.2 Computing the closure set of attributes
4.4.3 Entailment
4.5 Normal Forms
4.5.1 First Normal Form (1NF)
4.5.2 Second Normal Form (2NF)
4.5.3 Third Normal Form (3NF)
4.5.4 Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF)
4.6 Properties of Decompositions
4.6.1 Lossless and Lossy Decompositions
4.6.2 Dependency-Preserving Decompositions
4.7 Minimal Cover
4.8 Synthesis of 3NF schemas
4.9 3NF decomposition
4.10 The Fourth Normal Form (4NF)
4.10.1 Multi-valued dependencies
4.11 Other normal forms
4.12 A case study involving a Library Management System - Part 2 of 3
4.13 Summary
4.14 Exercises
4.15 Review questions
Chapter 5 – Introduction to SQL
5.1 History of SQL
5.2 Defining a relational database schema in SQL
5.2.1 Data Types
5.2.2 Creating a table
5.2.3 Creating a schema
5.2.4 Creating a view
5.2.5 Creating other database objects
5.2.6 Modifying database objects
5.2.7 Renaming database objects
5.3 Data manipulation with SQL
5.3.1 Selecting data
5.3.2 Inserting data
5.3.3 Deleting data
5.3.4 Updating data
5.4 Table joins
5.4.1 Inner joins
5.4.2 Outer joins
5.5 Union, intersection, and difference operations
5.5.1 Union
5.5.2 Intersection
5.5.3 Difference (Except)
5.6 Relational operators
5.6.1 Grouping operators
5.6.2 Aggregation operators
5.6.3 HAVING Clause
5.7 Sub-queries
5.7.1 Sub-queries returning a scalar value
5.7.2 Sub-queries returning vector values
5.7.3 Correlated sub-query
5.7.4 Sub-query in FROM Clauses
5.8 Mapping of object-oriented concepts to relational concepts
5.10 A case study involving a Library Management System - Part 3 of 3
5.9 Summary
5.10 Exercises
5.11 Review questions
Chapter 6 – Stored procedures and functions
6.1 Working with IBM Data Studio
6.1.1 Creating a project
6.2 Working with stored procedures
6.2.1 Types of procedures
6.2.2 Creating a stored procedure
6.2.3 Altering and dropping a stored procedure
6.3 Working with functions
6.3.1 Types of functions
6.3.2 Creating a function
6.3.3 Invoking a function
6.3.4 Altering and dropping a function
6.4 Summary
6.5 Exercises
6.6 Review Questions
Chapter 7 – Using SQL in an application
7.1 Using SQL in an application: The big picture
7.2 What is a transaction?
7.3 Embedded SQL
7.3.1 Static SQL
7.3.2 Dynamic SQL
7.3.3 Static vs. dynamic SQL
7.4 Database APIs
7.4.1 ODBC and the IBM Data Server CLI driver
7.4.2 JDBC
7.5 pureQuery
7.5.1 IBM pureQuery Client Optimizer
7.6 Summary
7.7 Exercises
7.8 Review Questions
Chapter 8 – Query languages for XML
8.1 Overview of XML
8.1.1 XML Elements and Database Objects
8.1.2 XML Attributes
8.1.3 Namespaces
8.1.4 Document Type Definitions
8.1.5 XML Schema
8.2 Overview of XML Schema
8.2.1 Simple Types
8.2.2 Complex Types
8.2.3 Integrity constraints
8.2.4 XML Schema evolution
8.3 XPath
8.3.1 The XPath data model
8.3.2 Document Nodes
8.3.3 Path Expressions
8.3.4 Advanced Navigation in XPath
8.3.5 XPath Semantics
8.3.6 XPath Queries
8.4 XQuery
8.4.1 XQuery basics
8.4.2 FLWOR expressions
8.4.3 Joins in XQuery
8.4.4 User-defined functions
8.4.5 XQuery and XML Schema
8.4.6 Grouping and aggregation
8.4.7 Quantification
8.5 XSLT
8.6 SQL/XML
8.6.1 Encoding relations as XML Documents
8.6.2 Storing and publishing XML documents
8.6.3 SQL/XML Functions
8.7 Querying XML documents stored in tables
8.8 Modifying data
8.8.1 XMLPARSE
8.8.2 XMLSERIALIZE
8.8.3 The TRANSFORM expression
8.9 Summary
8.10 Exercises
8.11 Review questions
Chapter 9 – Database Security
9.1 Database security: The big picture
9.1.2 Access control
9.1.3 Database security case study
9.1.4 Views
9.1.5 Integrity Control
9.1.6 Data encryption
9.2 Security policies and procedures
9.2.1 Personnel control
9.2.2 Physical access control
9.3 Summary
9.4 Exercises
9.5 Review Questions
Chapter 10 – Technology trends and databases
10.1 What is Cloud computing?
10.1.1 Characteristics of the Cloud
10.1.2 Cloud computing service models
10.1.3 Cloud providers
10.1.4 Handling security on the Cloud
10.1.5 Databases and the Cloud
10.2 Mobile application development
10.2.1 Developing for a specific device
10.2.2 Developing for an application platform
10.2.3 Mobile device platform
10.2.4 Mobile application development platform
10.2.5 The next wave of mobile applications
10.2.6 DB2 Everyplace
10.3 Business intelligence and appliances
10.4 db2university.com: Implementing an application on the Cloud (case study)
10.4.1 Moodle open source course management system
10.4.2 Enabling openID sign-in
10.4.3 Running on the Amazon Cloud
10.4.4 Using an Android phone to retrieve course marks
10.5 Summary
Appendix A – Solutions to review questions
Appendix B – Up and running with DB2
B.1 DB2: The big picture
B.2 DB2 Packaging
B.2.1 DB2 servers
B.2.2 DB2 Clients and Drivers
B.3 Installing DB2
B.3.1 Installation on Windows
B.3.2 Installation on Linux
B.4 DB2 tools
B.4.1 Control Center
B.4.2 Command Line Tools
B.5 The DB2 environment
B.6 DB2 configuration
B.7 Connecting to a database
B.8 Basic sample programs
B.9 DB2 documentation
Resources
Web sites
Books
References
Contact
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Database Fundamentals

Database Fundamentals

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Published by mmmaheshwari
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Published by: mmmaheshwari on Mar 02, 2013
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