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New Perspectives On The Great Pyramid Pt. 3: Music of the King's Chamber

New Perspectives On The Great Pyramid Pt. 3: Music of the King's Chamber

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Published by Bernard I. Pietsch
In the heart of the Great Pyramid, in the King's Chamber lies a stone sarcophagus--a rectangular red granite box with no lid. Although it never held the remains of a pharaoh, the coffer does contain a body of knowledge--the standards of measure needed to decode the architectural intent of the pyramid. The dimensions, material, and sound of the coffer are an integrated presentation of the architect's deepest understanding of harmony. Mr. Pietsch's original research reveals for the first time how the geometry, measure and indicated features of the coffer are key to understanding the meaning of the King's Chamber and the entire pyramid.
In the heart of the Great Pyramid, in the King's Chamber lies a stone sarcophagus--a rectangular red granite box with no lid. Although it never held the remains of a pharaoh, the coffer does contain a body of knowledge--the standards of measure needed to decode the architectural intent of the pyramid. The dimensions, material, and sound of the coffer are an integrated presentation of the architect's deepest understanding of harmony. Mr. Pietsch's original research reveals for the first time how the geometry, measure and indicated features of the coffer are key to understanding the meaning of the King's Chamber and the entire pyramid.

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Published by: Bernard I. Pietsch on Feb 28, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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05/10/2014

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© BernardPietsch/Suzanne ThompsonNew Perspectives On the GreatPyramid PartIIIPage1of17www.scribd.com/bernardpietsch
 
New Perspectives On the Great PyramidPartlll:
Music
of the 
King
 s Chamber 
• Architectural Nucleus of the Great Pyramid• Standard of Measure, Material and Sound• Keynoteto the Music of the Spheres• Eloquent Empty SpaceAdapted from the worksof 
Bernard
I. Pietsch
by Suzanne Thompson
 
© BernardPietsch/Suzanne ThompsonNew Perspectives On the GreatPyramid PartIIIPage2of17www.scribd.com/bernardpietsch
Photo: Roger Smeeth
Prologue
In the spring of 1976, Bernard received a phone call from jazz musician Paul Horn. Paulwas preparing for a trip to Egypt that would include an improvisational recording session inthe Great Pyramid. The recording produced from that trip was to become the popular newage classic, "Inside the Great Pyramid." In the album notes, Paul writes abouttheir conversation:“Ben loved the idea, (of playing flute inside the Great Pyramid) and said that soundand vibrations were an integral part of the structure. In fact, he said that every roomhas a basic vibration to it and that if we can find what it is and identify with it webecome in tune with that particular space. Ihad never heard that theory before, but itmade sense to me. Ben went on to say thatthe main chamber in the Great Pyramid wasthe King’s Chamber. In it is a hollow lidlessCoffer of solid granite. He said to strike thisCoffer and it will give off a tone. I shouldtune up to this note and I will be at one with,and in tune with this chamber! ‘ And by theway,’ he said, ‘ you’ll find that note to be ‘A’438 (vibrations per second…‘A’ 440 is theestablished pitch for tuning in the West.) Heseemed to know this quite definitely,although he had never been there.”“In the weeks to follow, I located a battery-operated device called a Korg TuningTrainer which could give me the exact pitchof any tone by registering it on a meter.“What the heck,” I thought, “just in case.”“The moment had arrived. It was time to play my flute. I thought of Ben Pietsch fromSanta Rosa, California and his suggestion to strike the Coffer. I leaned over and hitthe inside with the fleshy part of the side of my fist. A beautiful round tone wasimmediately produced. What a resonance! I remember him also saying when youhear that tone you will be “poised in history that is ever-present.” I took the electronictuning device I had brought along in one hand and struck the Coffer again with theother and there it was—‘A’ 438, just as Ben had predicted. I tuned up to this pitchand was ready to begin...The echo was wonderful, about eight seconds. Thechamber responded to every note equally. The album opens with these events sothat you can hear all of these things for yourselves. “
1
--Paul Horn.
1
Sound of the Coffer from “Inside the Great Pyramid” ©1977 by Paul Horn. All rights reserved. Used withpermission.
 
© BernardPietsch/Suzanne ThompsonNew Perspectives On the GreatPyramid PartIIIPage3of17www.scribd.com/bernardpietsch
In Tune with the Cosmos
The album “Inside the Great Pyramid” begins with the sound of three strikes on thesarcophagus. Its dramatic bell-like tone reverberatesinthe air of the chamber. Then,overlaying the sound of the Coffer, one hears the electronic tone of the Korg tuner followedby the smooth tone of Paul’s flute matching the sound. By re-tuning his flute to thisfrequency, every note he plays thereafter is reconciled to the harmonics of the room. At thatmoment Paul’s playing was in synch with the musical/numerical hologram of the pyramid--he was
actualizing 
the wisdom alluded to in esoteric rhetoric, his playing summoningknowledge not consciously invoked in 5 millennia
.
The
numeric frequencies
of the notesplayedbecomea libraryof information integrating the proportions of the pyramid with thedimensions of the earth and the human body. The pulse of human physiology harmonizingwith the periods of the planets--truly, jazz in conversation with the cosmos.1
2
A Note on the Significance of Tuning
The industry standard for the tuning of musical instruments in this country was notestablished until 1939. In previous centuries, Concert A varied from a high of 567 Hz in1619 to a low of 403 Hz in 1648. Until recently, differences in the tuning pitch of variousinstruments caused numerous problems for ensemble playing. For example, an organ builtin one period may have been tuned low, while a wind instrument from another era may havebeen tuned a half tone higher. To remedy the problem,Concert “A” at 440 Hz was adoptedby an international convention in 1889. As a result of that agreement all concert instrumentsnow tune to the same pitch. Although utilitarian, the tuning standard of A/440 was notselected for its organic properties--thenumerical frequencies of the notes of the modernmusical scale no longer correspond to anything meaningful.But the scale Paul played in the King’s Chamber, based on the tuning frequency of A/438.18 Hz, expresses in number, natural, meaningful correlations. All the frequencies of the notes of the scale which he played are significant. Whether scaled up or down by thedecimal, doubled, divided, trebled, quadrupled or rendered an octave higher or lower as inmusic, the permutations of 
438.18
relate to theentire pyramid. Dramatically, eachpermutation of 438.18 corresponds to some dynamic process, physiological function or property of the pyramid.
438.18
is a fundamental alchemical number, intimately linked withthe family of Canon Measures.Pythagoras (550 BCE) explained music as the expression of universal harmony which isalso realized in arithmetic and in astronomy. Kepler (1600) correlated musical tones andintervals with the movements of the planets and astrology. Leibniz (1700) called music an“unconscious exercise in arithmetic.” The notion that music could also be a medium of 
objective
communication—is more obscure. But in an ancient time, we believe that musicincorporated in its
structure
elements of an ancient science. The source of modern music isrooted in this ancient communication form. Like a hidden treasure, the keys to the treasureare the proper frequencies that animate the information and bring it to light. Though notconsciously recognizing it, while listening to Paul’s record, millions of people have beensubliminally receiving information encoded in the musical tones he plays. Now for the firsttime we can knowingly appreciate the beauty of the intended tonal correspondences.
2
More about Paul Horn at:
www.
 paulhornmusic 
.com

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