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Internment and Resettlement Operations - US Army

Internment and Resettlement Operations - US Army

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Published by bellumletale
Field manual (FM) 3-39.40 is aligned with FM 3-39, the military police keystone FM. FM 3-39.40 provides
guidance for commanders and staffs on internment and resettlement (I/R) operations. This manual addresses I/R
operations across the spectrum of conflict, specifically the doctrinal paradigm shift from traditional enemy
prisoner of war (EPW) operations to the broader and more inclusive requirements of detainee operations.

Additionally, FM 3-39.40 discusses the critical issue of detainee rehabilitation. It describes the doctrinal
foundation, principles, and processes that military police and other elements will employ when dealing with I/R
populations. As part of internment, these populations include U.S. military prisoners, and multiple categories of
detainees (civilian internees [CIs], retained personnel [RP], and enemy combatants), while resettlement
operations are focused on multiple categories of dislocated civilians (DCs).

Military police conduct I/R operations during offensive, defensive, stability, or civil support operations. I/R
operations include military police support to U.S. military prisoner and detainee operations within operational
environments (OEs), ranging from major combat operations to humanitarian-assistance missions in support of a
host nation (HN) or civil agency. I/R operations are a major subordinate Army tactical task under the
sustainment warfighting function. (See FM 7-15.) Placement under the sustainment warfighting function does
not mean that I/R operations do not have relevance in the other warfighting functions. While I/R is listed under
the sustainment warfighting function, it should be noted this is not a specified or implied mission of all
sustainment units or commands. Most sustainment units provide logistics, personnel services, and health service
support to I/R operations.

Military police are uniquely qualified to perform the full range of I/R operations. They have the requisite skill
sets provided through specific training and operational experience. The skills necessary for performing
confinement operations for U.S. military prisoners in permanent facilities are directly transferable and adaptable
for tactical confinement of U.S. military prisoners and detention of detainees. All military police units are
specifically manned, equipped, and trained to perform I/R operations across the spectrum and those identified as
I/R units are the specialists within the Army for this role.
Field manual (FM) 3-39.40 is aligned with FM 3-39, the military police keystone FM. FM 3-39.40 provides
guidance for commanders and staffs on internment and resettlement (I/R) operations. This manual addresses I/R
operations across the spectrum of conflict, specifically the doctrinal paradigm shift from traditional enemy
prisoner of war (EPW) operations to the broader and more inclusive requirements of detainee operations.

Additionally, FM 3-39.40 discusses the critical issue of detainee rehabilitation. It describes the doctrinal
foundation, principles, and processes that military police and other elements will employ when dealing with I/R
populations. As part of internment, these populations include U.S. military prisoners, and multiple categories of
detainees (civilian internees [CIs], retained personnel [RP], and enemy combatants), while resettlement
operations are focused on multiple categories of dislocated civilians (DCs).

Military police conduct I/R operations during offensive, defensive, stability, or civil support operations. I/R
operations include military police support to U.S. military prisoner and detainee operations within operational
environments (OEs), ranging from major combat operations to humanitarian-assistance missions in support of a
host nation (HN) or civil agency. I/R operations are a major subordinate Army tactical task under the
sustainment warfighting function. (See FM 7-15.) Placement under the sustainment warfighting function does
not mean that I/R operations do not have relevance in the other warfighting functions. While I/R is listed under
the sustainment warfighting function, it should be noted this is not a specified or implied mission of all
sustainment units or commands. Most sustainment units provide logistics, personnel services, and health service
support to I/R operations.

Military police are uniquely qualified to perform the full range of I/R operations. They have the requisite skill
sets provided through specific training and operational experience. The skills necessary for performing
confinement operations for U.S. military prisoners in permanent facilities are directly transferable and adaptable
for tactical confinement of U.S. military prisoners and detention of detainees. All military police units are
specifically manned, equipped, and trained to perform I/R operations across the spectrum and those identified as
I/R units are the specialists within the Army for this role.

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Published by: bellumletale on Mar 06, 2013
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FM 3-39.40INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS
February 2010
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION:
Distribution authorized to the DOD and DODcontractors only to protect technical or operational information from automaticdissemination under the International Exchange Program or by other means. Thisdetermination was made on 8 December 2008. Other requests for this documentmust be referred to the Commandant, U.S. Army Military Police School, ATTN: ATZT-TDD-M, 320 MANSCEN Loop, Suite 270, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri 65473-8929.
DESTRUCTION NOTICE:
Destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents or reconstruction of the document.
 
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
 
This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil)andGeneral Dennis J. Reimer Training and DoctrineDigital Library at (www.train.army.mil).
 
FM 3-39.40
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Distribution authorized to the DOD and DOD contractors only to protect technicalor operational information from automatic dissemination under the International Exchange Program or by other means. This determination was made on 8 December 2008. Other requests for this document must be referred tothe Commandant, U.S. Army Military Police School, ATTN: ATZT-TDD-M, 320 MANSCEN Loop, Suite 270, FortLeonard Wood, Missouri 65473-8929.*This publication supersedes FM 3-19.40, 4 September 2007.i
Field Manual No. 3-39.40HeadquartersDepartment of the ArmyWashington, D.C., 12 February 2010
Internment and Resettlement Operations
Contents
Page
PREFACE ........................................................................................................... viii
 
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... xi
 
Chapter 1 INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT AND THE OPERATIONALENVIRONMENT .................................................................................................. 1-1
 
Conduct ............................................................................................................... 1-1
 
Principles ............................................................................................................. 1-3
 
Personnel Categories .......................................................................................... 1-5
 
Status Determination ........................................................................................... 1-7
 
 Article 5 Tribunals ................................................................................................ 1-8
 
 Appeals and Periodic Reviews of Civilian Internees ........................................... 1-9
 
General Protection and Care of Detainees, U.S. Military Prisoners, andDislocated Civilians ........................................................................................ 1-10
 
 Agencies Concerned With Internment and Resettlement ................................. 1-12
 
Protecting Power ............................................................................................... 1-13
 
Planning Considerations for Internment and Resettlement Operations ............ 1-14
 
Military Police Capabilities ................................................................................ 1-16
 
Chapter 2 INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT IN SUPPORT OF THE SPECTRUM OFOPERATIONS ..................................................................................................... 2-1
 
Support to Combat Operations ........................................................................... 2-1
 
Support to Stability Operations ........................................................................... 2-3
 
Support to Civil Support Operations .................................................................... 2-8
 
 Army Command and Support Relationships ....................................................... 2-8
 
Considerations Within the Operational Area and the Area of Operations .......... 2-9
 
Chapter 3 COMMAND AND STAFF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ........................... 3-1
 
National and Theater Reporting Agencies .......................................................... 3-1
 
Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................................. 3-2
 

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