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A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens

A Child's History of England by Charles Dickens

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Published by Donnette Davis
One book in a selection of famous works by Charles Dickens, created speficially for my educators' calendar to commemmorate his birthday on 07 February. The books contain literature unit studies, executive summaries (for older learners) and external links in some cases. Ideal for homeschooling.
One book in a selection of famous works by Charles Dickens, created speficially for my educators' calendar to commemmorate his birthday on 07 February. The books contain literature unit studies, executive summaries (for older learners) and external links in some cases. Ideal for homeschooling.

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Published by: Donnette Davis on Feb 28, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/10/2014

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St Aiden’s Homeschool  St Aiden’s Homeschool  St Aiden’s Homeschool  St Aiden’s Homeschool  
 A Child’s History Of England   A Child’s History Of England   A Child’s History Of England   A Child’s History Of England  
By CHARLES DICKENSWith Illustrations by F. H. Townsend and othersLONDON: CHAPMAN & HALL,
LD
.NEW YORK: CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS 1905Arranged & Digitally Reconstructed by Donnette E Daviswww.staidenshomeschool.com 2009
 
A Child’s History of Englandwww.staidenshomeschool.com 2009 All Rights Reserved
2
A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND
By CHARLES DICKENSWith Illustrations by F. H. Townsend and othersLONDON: CHAPMAN & HALL,
LD
.NEW YORK: CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS 1905
DESCRIPTION PAGE 
CHAPTER I— ANCIENT ENGLAND AND ALL THE ROMANS 3CHAPTER II—ANCIENT ENGLAND UNDER THE EARLY SAXONS 10CHAPTER III—ENGLAND UNDER THE GOOD SAXON, ALFRED 14CHAPTER IV ENGLAND UNDER THE ATHELSTAN AND THE 6 BOY-KINGS 18CHAPTER V – ENGLAND UNDER CANUTE THE DANECHAPTER VI—ENGLAND UNDER HAROLD HAREFOOT, HARDICANUTE, AND EDWARD THE CONFESSOR 28CHAPTER VII ENGLAND UNDER HAROLD SECOND & CONQUERED BY THE NORMANS 33CHAPTER VIII – ENGLAND UNDER WILLIAM 1
ST
THE NORMAN CONQUEROR 36CHAPTER IX – ENGLAND UNDER WILLIAM 2
ND
CALLED RUFUS 41CHAPTER X – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 1
ST
CALLED FINE SCHOLAR 46CHAPTER XI ENGLAND UNDER MATHILDA & STEPHEN 54CHAPTER XII – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 2
ND
57CHAPTER XIII – ENGLAND UNDER RICHARD 1
ST
CALLED LION HEART 71CHAPTER XIV ENGLAND UNDER KING JOHN CALLED LACKLAND 78CHAPTER XV – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 3
RD
CALLED WINCHESTER 87CHAPTER XVI – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 1
ST
CALLED LONGSHANKS 96CHAPTER XVII – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 2
ND
108CHAPTER XVIII – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 3
RD
115CHAPTER XIX – ENGLAND UNDER RICHARD 2
ND
124CHAPTER XX – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 4
TH
CALLED BOLINGBROKE 132CHAPTER XXI – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 5
TH
136CHAPTER XXII – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 6
TH
143CHAPTER XXIII – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 4
TH
157CHAPTER XXIV – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 5
TH
163CHAPTER XXV - ENGLAND UNDER RICHARD 3
RD
167CHAPTER XXVI – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 7
TH
170CHAPTER XXVII – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 8
TH
(PART 1) 178CHAPTER XXVIII – ENGLAND UNDER HENRY 8
TH
(PART 2) 187CHAPTER XXIX – ENGLAND UNDER EDWARD 6
TH
194CHAPTER XXX ENGLAND UNDER MARY 200CHAPTER XXXI ENGLAND UNDER ELIZABETH 209CHAPTER XXXII– ENGLAND UNDER JAMES 1
ST
221CHAPTER XXXIII– ENGLAND UNDER CHARLES 1
ST
238CHAPTER XXXIV ENGLAND UNDER OLIVER CROMWELL 258CHAPTER XXXV – ENGLAND UNDER CHARLES 2
ND
269CHAPTER XXXVI – ENGLAND UNDER JAMES 2
ND
284CHAPTER XXXVII CONCLUSION 293ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & TOU 295
 
A Child’s History of Englandwww.staidenshomeschool.com 2009 All Rights Reserved
3
CHAPTER IANCIENT ENGLAND AND THE ROMANS
If you look at a Map of the World, you will see, in the left-hand upper corner of theEastern Hemisphere, two Islands lying in the sea. They are England and Scotland,and Ireland. England and Scotland form the greater part of these Islands. Ireland isthe next in size. The little neighbouring islands, which are so small upon the Map asto be mere dots, are chiefly little bits of Scotland,—broken off, I dare say, in thecourse of a great length of time, by the power of the restless water.In the old days, a long, long while ago, before Our Saviour was born on earth andlay asleep in a manger, these Islands were in the same place, and the stormy searoared round them, just as it roars now. But the sea was not alive, then, with greatships and brave sailors, sailing to and from all parts of the world. It was very lonely.The Islands lay solitary, in the great expanse of water. The foaming waves dashedagainst their cliffs, and the bleak winds blew over their forests; but the winds andwaves brought no adventurers to land upon the Islands, and the savage Islandersknew nothing of the rest of the world, and the rest of the world knew nothing ofthem.It is supposed that the Phœnicians, who were an ancient people, famous for carrying on trade, came in ships to these Islands, and found that they produced tinand lead; both very useful things, as you know, and both produced to this very hour upon the sea-coast. The most celebrated tin mines in Cornwall are, still, close to thesea. One of them, which I have seen, is so close to it that it is hollowed outunderneath the ocean; and the miners say, that in stormy weather, when they areat work down in that deep place, they can hear the noise of the waves thunderingabove their heads. So, the Phœnicians, coasting about the Islands, would come,without much difficulty, to where the tin and lead were.The Phœnicians traded with the Islanders for these metals, and gave the Islanderssome other useful things in exchange. The Islanders were, at first, poor savages,going almost naked, or only dressed in the rough skins of beasts, and staining their bodies, as other savages do, with coloured earths and the juices of plants. But thePhœnicians, sailing over to the opposite coasts of France and Belgium, and sayingto the people there, ‘We have been to those white cliffs across the water, whichyou can see in fine weather, and from that country, which is called B
RITAIN
, we bringthis tin and lead,’ tempted some of the French and Belgians to come over also.These people settled themselves on the south coast of England, which is now calledKent; and, although they were a rough people too, they taught the savage Britons

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