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Steve Ditko's Monsters, Vol. 1: Gorgo Preview

Steve Ditko's Monsters, Vol. 1: Gorgo Preview

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Published by Graphic Policy
Joe Gill (w) • Steve Ditko (a & c)

The genius artist Steve Ditko is a towering monster of awesomeness…and so is the character he chronicled….GORGO! If you love Godzilla–and who doesn't–you'll love Gorgo who ravages London, New York City, and HOLLYWOOD! Gorgo goes head to head with the British Navy, atomic bombs, Communists, and aliens from the planet Corpus III! This is the complete Ditko Gorgo, 200 pages of comics, including 6 pulse-pounding covers all drawn during the height of Ditko's prowess concurrent with his Spider-man and Dr. Strange creative explosions. Scripts are by the fan favorite writer Joe Gill. Introduction by Eisner award winner Craig Yoe with fascinating insight into the comics and the monster movie that inspired them. Every page is lovingly restored and the book is a large format 224-page hardcover to showcase the monstrous Ditko art.

HC • FC • $34.99 • 224 pages • 8.5” x 11” • ISBN 978-1-61377-552-3
Joe Gill (w) • Steve Ditko (a & c)

The genius artist Steve Ditko is a towering monster of awesomeness…and so is the character he chronicled….GORGO! If you love Godzilla–and who doesn't–you'll love Gorgo who ravages London, New York City, and HOLLYWOOD! Gorgo goes head to head with the British Navy, atomic bombs, Communists, and aliens from the planet Corpus III! This is the complete Ditko Gorgo, 200 pages of comics, including 6 pulse-pounding covers all drawn during the height of Ditko's prowess concurrent with his Spider-man and Dr. Strange creative explosions. Scripts are by the fan favorite writer Joe Gill. Introduction by Eisner award winner Craig Yoe with fascinating insight into the comics and the monster movie that inspired them. Every page is lovingly restored and the book is a large format 224-page hardcover to showcase the monstrous Ditko art.

HC • FC • $34.99 • 224 pages • 8.5” x 11” • ISBN 978-1-61377-552-3

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Categories:Types, Comics
Published by: Graphic Policy on Mar 06, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/06/2013

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MONSTERS
 
DITKO
GORGO! 
Scripts by
 JOE GILL
Edited & Designed by
CRAIG YOE
 
IDW PUBLISHING
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
®
 
Edited and Designed by
CRAIG YOE
Produced by
CLIZIA GUSSONI
Comics from the collections of
DAVID BURD,JIM VADEBONCOEUR, JR.,
and
JOE LATINO
MONST
 
DITK
 
1961 movie poster for
Gorgo
boast-ed “like nothing you’ve ever seenbefore,” but that was obvious hype.Gorgo’s story was a synthesis of the
giant monster icks that stompedbefore it, particularly
Godzilla
.Later, the
 Mystery Science The-ater 3000
folks did a send-up of the
ick. Tongues rmly in cheek, theyproclaimed, “The plot of 
King Kong!
The mon
-ster from
Godzilla!
The set decorations from
Ol-iver!”
 
Gorgo
was directed by Russian-bornEugene Lourie, who ed his country after contrib
-
uting to an anti-Communist lm,
 Black Crowes,
 
in 1919. He nanced his way to France by draw
-ing movie posters. In the 1930s, Lourie worked
as a production designer for directors Max Ophülsand René Clair in France. He also collaboratedwith Jean Renoir on
 La Grande Illusion
(1937)
and followed him to Hollywood. There Lou
-
rie worked as an art director on Char
-lie Chaplin’s
 Limelight 
(1952).
His own directorial debut was
 in 1953 with
the protable
The Beast from 20,000Fathoms,
the rst
of three dinosaur
movies. Thespecial ef 
-
fects wereby the direc
-
tor and Ray Harry
-
hasen. Accordingto lm his
-
torian Tom
Weaver,
“The director saidthat hissix-year-old
daughter was up-set that the mon-ster met his demiseat the end in
The Beast,
crying ‘You’re a bad daddy!You killed the big, nice beast!’
Gorgo
was Lourie’s answer for
her, with its happier outcome andtheme of maternal love. Reported
-
ly, ex-gangsters Frank, Maurice,
and Herman King of King Broth-
ers Production, loved their dear ol’mother and gladly bought into the lm. In fact, Gorgo’smom was the only female of any note in the lm.
Lourie
became typecast as a science ction director, which he felt
limited him. After putting
Gorgo
in the can, he declared hewould not direct “the same comic-strip monsters.” Guessthe guy didn’t respect the comics!
Eight years later, Lou-
rie received an Academy Award nomination for his visualeffects on
Krakatoa, East of Java.
He also designed ClintEastwood’s wonderful
 Bronco Billy
(1980) and appeared on
screen in Jim McBride’s
 Breathless
(1983) starring Richard
Gere.
The original location of 
Gorgo
was planned to be
Japan. It was then switched to France before King Broth
-
ers nally settled on England.
Keep Watching the Skies,
a
book by Bill Warren, contends that Australia was anoth
-
er locale in the running, but the producers concluded lm
-
goers “wouldn’t care” if a monster leveled that continent.And it was thought that Australia didn’t have any recogniz
-
able national monuments to destroy. So Merry OldEngland it was, and in the breathless words of ForrestJ. Ackerman in the 11th issue of 
Famous Monsters of Filmland,
“Despite every military effort the mighty mon-
ster makes its way up the Thames and across the teemingcity of London, sending national monuments crashing likebowling pins, crushing buses and people like eggshells.
Big Ben… Westminster Abbey… the Houses of Parlia-
ment… and the Thames Tower Bridge—all are left in ruins
by the great Gorgo’s rage and rampage.”
Lourie recalled,“The actual making of the lm was interesting, and I triedto make it as spectacular as possible.” He related that theLondon-smashing scenes were “all done with breakawaysets. For these scenes we had built a large tank about threefeet deep, occupying an entire stage of MGM Studios, inwhich were replicas of the Tower Bridge and
the surrounding shoreinstallations. Here we
staged the destruction
of the bridge and thebeast walking awayin the river.” Lou-rie went on to say,“We obtained benevo-
lent cooperation from
the British Army and the Lon-
don police authorities. We were
allowed to use army tanks and
vehicles and to shoot day andnight sequences on the Tow
-
er Bridge and many centralstreets. We later had to combine shotsmade at night in Piccadilly Circus withshots of panicky crowds. Simultaneous
-ly the beast was destroying the lumi-nous signs on the roofs of the surround-
ing buildings. From the sheer numberof special effects, it was a very ambi
-tious enterprise indeed.”
Lourie con
-
cluded, “I joyfully destroyed the city of London... in color and with a wonder
-
ful display of spectacular photograph
-
T
HE
I
ntroductIon
 
b
c
raIg
oe
GORGO! 

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