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Public-Private Partnership in Education

Public-Private Partnership in Education

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Published by Ramon T. Ayco
PDI helps peasants and IPs in their economic production and livelihood by providing them economic support services. But this is not enough. PDI believes the people need education if only to acquire knowledge and skills in order for them to become effective managers of their own economic resources and become self-reliant in their endeavor for continuous development.
PDI helps peasants and IPs in their economic production and livelihood by providing them economic support services. But this is not enough. PDI believes the people need education if only to acquire knowledge and skills in order for them to become effective managers of their own economic resources and become self-reliant in their endeavor for continuous development.

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Published by: Ramon T. Ayco on Mar 02, 2009
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05/10/2014

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Project Development Institute
... building self-
reliant communities through people’s initiatives
 
Public-Private Partnershipin Education
By Ramon T. Ayco, Sr.March 200744 Gen. Segundo Street, Heroes Hill,Sta. Cruz, Quezon City Philippines
 
Public-Private Partnership in Education
By Ramon T. Ayco, Sr.March 2007
Introduction
Project Development Institute (PDI) is deeply committed to poverty alleviation in thecountryside and to
rural development. PDI’s goal i
s geared towards the democratization of assetsspecifically the distribution of agricultural lands for the landless peasants through theimplementation of Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP) and the recognition of therights of the indigenous peoples (IPs) in their ancestral domain claim through the implementationof Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA).But success in CARP and in IPRA per se is not a guarantee for continuous development towardspoverty alleviation for the peasants and IPs. For one, because of intense hardship in living andlack of knowledge and skills in managing their resources, many peasant and IP beneficiaries endup selling their newly acquired property or property rights and remain poor.PDI helps peasants and IPs in their economic production and livelihood by providing themeconomic support services. But this is not enough. PDI believes the people need education if only to acquire knowledge and skills in order for them to become effective managers of theirown economic resources and become self-reliant in their endeavour for continuous development.
The Need for Public-PrivatePartnership in Education
The Philippines faces overwhelming problems in education. We cannot depend on thegovernment alone to shoulder the task of educating people especially the poor. On the contrary,the government itself is one of the problems in education by putting it in the least priority andgiving it a very low budget. Any private entities interested in helping the poor people througheducation must implement its own program for education.But any program for education to be implemented by private sector, commercial or non-commercial, needs to conform to the national education system being implemented by thegovernment. Especially those education programs intended for the poor people must be inaccordance with the national education system if only to become legitimate and beacknowledged by the society.
Conforming to the national education system is the first level of  public-private partnership in education.
 
PDI’s education programmes do not only conform to the education system of the country.
In theimplementation of its education programmes especially its non-formal education program, PDIalso partners two government agencies
 – 
The Department of Education (DepEd) and theNational Commission on Indigenous People (NCIP); and one private institution -- The AngpingDevelopment Foundation for Education (ADFE).
Partnering with government agencies and  private entity for education, like DepEd and ADFE, in implementing private sector education program is a higher form of public-private partnership in education.
 
 
The national education system
The national education system being implemented by the government embraces formal and non-formal education. Formal education is a sequential progression of academic schooling at threelevels, namely elementary, secondary and tertiary education. The 1987 Philippine Constitutionmandates the establishment of a system of free public education in the elementary and highschool levels.The first level, elementary or primary education involves compulsory six grades in publicschools and seven grades in some private schools, in addition to optional pre-school programmes(DECS, 1994). The pre-school education usually consists of kindergarten schooling and maycover other preparatory courses. At the age of 3 or 4, a pupil may enter nursery school until 5and at 6 years old proceeds to grade one.The second level or secondary education corresponds to four years of high school, theprerequisite of which is completion of the elementary level. A student enters the secondary levelat age 12 and graduates at 15. There are two types of secondary schools according to curricularofferings: the general high school and the vocational high school. General high schools offer thefour-year general academic secondary curriculum while vocational high schools offer the samesecondary curriculum with additional vocational courses. Science high schools offer an enrichedScience, Mathematics, and English curriculum in addition to the requirements of the secondaryeducation curriculum.The third level is tertiary education or higher education where a student enters at age 16. Highereducation
is divided into collegiate, master’s and doctorate le
vels in various programmes ordisciplines. Post-secondary schooling consists of two or three-year non-degree technical ortechnician courses.Non-formal education, which includes the acquisition of knowledge even outside schoolpremises, is aimed at attaining specific learning objectives. For a particular clientele, especiallythe out-of-school youth or adult illiterates who cannot avail themselves of formal education,there is, for example, a functional literacy programmes for non-literate and semi-literate adultswhich integrate basic literacy with livelihood skills training.The responsibility of administering, supervising and regulating basic education (elementary andsecondary education) is vested in the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS)while that of higher education is lodged in the Commission on Higher Education (CHED). Thepost-secondary technical-vocational education is under the Technical Education and SkillsDevelopment Authority (TESDA) which is also in charge of skills orientation, training anddevelopment of out-of-school youth and unemployed community adults.
PDI’s education programme
 
PDI has a vision of building and strengthening peasant and IP communities and People’s
Organizations (POs) committed to the pursuit of genuine agrarian reform and rural development.This vast human capital in the rural areas, although abused and underutilized, is one of the major

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