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Unboundedly Rational Religion

Unboundedly Rational Religion

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Published by stephen theron
The title is a play on Kant's "Religion within the Bounds of Reason Alone"
The title is a play on Kant's "Religion within the Bounds of Reason Alone"

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categoriesTypes, School Work
Published by: stephen theron on Mar 03, 2009
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04/26/2013

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Unboundedly Rational Religion
Thinking the Inheritance
by
Stephen Theron
 
 
CONTENTS
PART ONE CONTENTS....................................................................................................2Preface.........................................................................................................3INTRODUCTION: How Real Are We?......................................................4Faith as Thinking with Assent.............................................................15 Trinitarian Philosophy...............................................................................26 The Identity of All Being(s).................................................................46Creation, Exemplarism and Divine Ideas .........................................55Creation stricto sensu............................................................................67Metaphysics and Creation......................................................................83Infinity and Created Being................................................................88Rethinking God.........................................................................................98From Soul to Self................................................................................110 Transcendent Immanence, Immanent Transcendence.......................120Precepts and Inclinations ....................................................................143Beyond Natural Law.............................................................................147How to Deconstruct Human Rights..................................................166Dialectical Reason..................................................................................179Grace and Ecumenism.........................................................................187Religion and Freedom...........................................................................195A Cultural Basis for the European Union?....................................204BIBLIOGRAPHY.........................................................................................419INDEX.......................................................................................................423BIBLIOGRAPHY………………………………………………………………………….383INDEX.......................................................................................................3872
 
Preface
Monotheism might be regarded as the absolutisation of the absolute point of view with which both modern philosophy and modern science have striven to identify themselves, to the pointof eschewing merely natural certainties. Thus it has in a sense preceded these two phenomenaas condition for their birth, a condition they not unnaturally seek ceaselessly to improve upon,in an at least partial rejection. This is captured by the notion of differentiation andreintegration as one operation, arguably the essence of the ancient three-termed syllogism.
 This book therefore attempts the ultimate reintegration of recasting thespontaneous religious movement of monotheism, of Judaism developinginto Christianity, arguably a form of atheism, in scientific or absolutemode. Islam, where touched upon, is treated under its aspect, incidental itmay be but undeniable historically, of one of the many variants uponChristianity.It does not ignore the previous attempt by Hegel to do precisely the samebut rather builds consciously upon it. An experience of neo-Thomismvirtually unknown to Hegel is also brought to bear, leading to theconclusion that it is Hegel rather than the neo-scholastics or Jesuits oreven Kant who develops the Thomist Augustinian Aristoteliandevelopments. If it was Kant who differentiated here then Hegelreintegrated, while we here have performed a further reintegration,centring ultimately upon Parmenides. The final position though, asstressing human command over the material presented to thought,freedom over being, is distinctively post-modern.An introductory chapter loads the scales in favour of an idealist approachin quasi-Quinean sense, in that being is called in question, as it isthroughout the book. After a chapter revising the best expositions of faithas a possibly rational attitude the Christian discovery or intuition of intra-divine events or processes, held compatible with divine infinity andimmutability, is treated under the rubric of a Trinitarian philosophy. Thisleads to analysis of notions of being (identity in difference) and, above all,of creation, viewing this as freed from the historic dualism which hascontradicted the necessary infinity of the first principle. Creation is notthereby denied but seen as truly a constituent of the divine life. Thepicture is thus monistic, which is to say scientific as presenting a holisticsystem or way of seeing things absolutely or beyond appearance merely. The consequences for human metaphysical and moral nature arerigorously drawn, freed from all anthropomorphisms so as better toilluminate the insights of religion and philosophy. The relevance forcontemporary movements from palaeontology to Church ecumenism isbrought out, while a concluding epilogue attempts to shed light on thevexed debate on Europe in relation to the Christian inheritance. Otherconcluding chapters treat of both sacramental religion and of dialectic asthe method of reason, whether in theology or in the world. For the worldwithout the reason is not an object of thought, any more than you canwash the fur without wetting it, in G. Frege’s words.3

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